Study: Marijuana Use History Not Independently Associated With Atherosclerosis

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

According to new information published in the journal Addiction, marijuana use over time is not independently associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis, or hardened arteries. A team of researchers from the United States and Switzerland looked at the use of tobacco and/or cannabis in association with atherosclerosis in a group of 3,117 subjects between ages 18 and 30. Those who had never smoked tobacco, but had used marijuana, were “were not associated with AAC (abdominal artery calcium) or CAC (coronary artery calcium).” On the other end of the spectrum, those who had smoked tobacco but not marijuana, or had used both substances, for over five years were at an increased risk of subclinical atherosclerosis. This supports previous finding that suggest marijuana use over a span of time does not increase risk for cardiovascular disease, stroke, or coronary heart disease.

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Can Marijuana Help You Lose Weight?

Photo Credit: Max Pixel

Photo Credit: Max Pixel

Contrary to popular belief, marijuana may actually help people lose weight instead of gain weight. This seems contradictory to the fact that marijuana does in fact cause the munchies. One study from 2014 from the University of Bordeaux found THC interacts with CB1 receptor’s in the brain’s olfactory bulb, leading to a strengthened ability to smell food and increased food consumption. Additionally, research has found CB1 receptor activation leads to the release of the hormone ghrelin, which increases user appetite.

Still, studies have found marijuana use is linked to a lower body mass index (BMI), and one study from 2013 involving 13,000 adults found marijuana users had 16% lower fasting insulin levels and lower insulin resistance levels than non users. Additionally, marijuana users had smaller waist circumferences and lower BMI than non-users. Another study from 2015 found communities that had implemented medical marijuana programs were associated with 2-6% lower rates of obesity. Researchers believe marijuana’s ability to promote weight loss may be attributed to the cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). In a study from 2013, mice were fed 10 mg THCV once a day. These mice exhibited lower glucose intolerance, which is a symptom of type 2 diabetes. A lower glucose intolerance is associated with weight loss. Another way marijuana can help with weight loss is through activation of the CB2 receptors, which, according to an Australian study in 2015, reduces appetite and prevents the buildup of body fat. Another study from 2012 involving male rats found cannabidiol (CBD) reduced appetite and caused the rats to eat less food over time than those who were fed placebo.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Studies Confirm, Again, That Cannabis Reduces Opioid Use

Photo Credit: Merry Jane

Photo Credit: Merry Jane

In one of our recent posts, we discussed a survey coming from New Mexico, which found 80% of the 37 respondents enrolled in a medical marijuana program reduced their opioid use, and 40% stopped opioid use to use cannabis. Now, the preliminary results from another study conducted by private research firm Aclara in Illinois supports these results. In the study involving 400 Illinois patients, 67% stopped using opioids after enrolling in the state’s medical marijuana program. Additionally, 37% stopped using all conventional medications, and 60% reduced their use of prescription drugs and reduced their trips to the pharmacy. The study also reached out to 500 pharmacists in Illinois, and found 87% thought medical cannabis should be legal, and 69% thought pharmacies should have the ability to dispense the product. Carmen Brace, founder of Aclara Research, explains, “Patients are using cannabis, successfully, to wean themselves off opioid usage.” She continues to link the results of this study to one published in the Journal of Pain in 2016, in which chronic pain patients successfully reduced opioid use by 64%.

These studies are especially important in light of the opioid crisis, in which opioid-related deaths have skyrocketed. In one analysis from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2016, states that had implemented medical marijuana programs saw 25% fewer opioid-related deaths than states that did not have such programs. All of these studies point to the suggestion that cannabis can, in fact, fight the opioid crisis. This information has been provided by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana for Insomnia

Photo Credit: Sadie Hernandez (https://bit.ly/2KQlizp).

Photo Credit: Sadie Hernandez (https://bit.ly/2KQlizp).

New research suggests medical marijuana may be able to help people who suffer from sleep disorders like insomnia. Symptoms of insomnia include difficulty falling asleep, waking up in the middle of the night, sleepiness during the day, depression, anxiety, irritability, and worrying about sleep. The American Sleep Association claims 30% of adults suffer from short-term sleep issues, and 10% suffer from chronic insomnia. Current treatment options include prescribing sleep medication, treating conditions which may be causing the disorder, or undergoing behavioral therapy. Studies have found marijuana may be able to offer an alternative therapy for insomnia. One research review from 2017 found the cannabinoid THC could help patients fall asleep faster. Another study from 2004 found CBD had the opposite effect, and actually produced wake-inducing effects. Another study from 2006 found patients who were prescribed synthetic marijuana for pain also used the medication because it improved sleep. A study from 2004 found THC and Sativex reduced pain and increased sleep.

While marijuana can serve as a sleep aid, there are side effects that coincide with using the medication as well. It may reduce dreaming through diminishing REM sleep, cause a hangover-like effect, and become less effective over time. For most, reducing dreams would be a negative side effect, but acoording to one scientific review in 2017, this was actually a beneficial outcome for patients suffering from PTSD. For those patients, the synthetic cannabinoid nabilone effectively reduced nightmares. Various studies have found that using marijuana before bed can produce increased sleepiness, changes in mood, memory impairment, and increased daytime sleep the following day. Lastly, marijuana may be best used as an occasional sleep aid. Overtime, chronic used of the medication becomes less effective, but at the same time stopping its use can further make sleep difficult.

There are pros and cons to using marijuana as a sleep aid. When choosing to use the medication, it is best to use in lower doses and infrequently. If you use the medical cannabis for sleep, be sure to keep track of it with our journaling function. That way, you can monitor the frequency and strength of your dose, while also keeping track of whether or not its benefits outweigh its negative side effects. This information has been provided in part by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This post does not represent an endorsement on behalf of Leaf Science for our product.

Cannabis May Help Those With Heart Failure - But Caution Before Use

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

New research suggests cannabis may be able to help those suffering from heart failure, but patients should remain cautious until further research is conducted. Investigators led by Dr. Oluwole Adegbala from the Englewood Hospital and Medical Center in New Jersey found patients who had used cannabis were less likely to die in the hospital or experience atrial fibrillation (A-fib), an irregular heartbeat that can cause more serious complications like blood clots and stroke. The team looked at data from over six million patients that were hospitalized for heart failure between 2007 and 2014, and found 1,200 were considered dependent on cannabis and 23,000 had used cannabis without dependency issues. Those who weren’t dependent on cannabis were 18% less likely to develop A-fib, and dependent users were 31% less likely to develop the condition, than those who didn’t use cannabis. In addition, nondependent users were 46% less likely, and dependent users were 58% less likely, to die while hospitalized than those who abstained from use.

While the link remains unknown, Dr. Adegbala theorizes cannabis may be able to reduce A-fib and heart-related mortality due to its ability to reduce high blood pressure, atherosclerosis, and inflammation. That said, she cautions heart failure patients against using the plant until more research is conducted. This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

New Mexico Study Finds Medical Marijuana May Help Reduce Opioid Addiction

Photo Credit:  Flickr / frankieleon / CC BY 2.0

Photo Credit: Flickr / frankieleon / CC BY 2.0

A new study coming from New Mexico and published in the journal PLOS ONE can be added to the mounting support suggesting medical marijuana can combat the opioid epidemic. The study led by Dr. Jacob Miguel Vigil and Dr. Sarah See Stith looked at 37 chronic pain patients who used opioids habitually and enrolled in New Mexico’s medical marijuana program between 2010 and 2015, and found cannabis helped reduce opioid addiction in these patients. The researchers simultaneously looked at 29 patients who did not enroll in the medical marijuana program. Using the state’s Prescription Monitoring Program, the researchers compared opioid record between the two groups over a 21 month period. Those who used medical marijuana were 17 times more likely to stop opioid use, and 5 times more likely to reduce their daily opioid intake. Daily dosage averaged at a 47% reduction through medical marijuana use. Those who chose not to enroll in the state’s program experienced a 10% increase in dosage. The researchers hope for more in depth, randomized, and placebo-based clinical trials moving forward.

This information has been provided by Marijuana Industry News and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana Use Reduces In-Hospital Mortality in Heart Failure Patients, Study Finds

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

A new study published in the journal Circulation has found heart failure patients with a history of cannabis use are at lower risk of dying while hospitalized than their similarly matched controls. Looking at over six million hear failure patients over a seven-year period, investigators found patients who had a history of cannabis use were less likely to have atrial fibrillation, spent less time in the hospital, and were less likely to pass while hospitalized than non-users. Authors explain, “Our study showed that cannabis use lowered the odds of atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure… There was also reduced in-hospital mortality among patients admitted for the primary diagnosis of heart failure in DU (cannabis dependent users) and NDU (non-dependent cannabis users) which was not explained by comorbid conditions and demographic data. This study provides important opportunity to explore the preventive mechanism of cannabis on atrial fibrillation and its therapeutic potential in heart failure patients.” Previous studies have similarly reported positive correlations between patients who tested positive for marijuana and survival rates for heart related traumas.

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Medical Marijuana for ADHD

Photo Credit: Jesper Sehested / PlusLexia.com https://bit.ly/2Zf7wdx.

Photo Credit: Jesper Sehested / PlusLexia.com https://bit.ly/2Zf7wdx.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a mental disorder affecting focus, attention, and behavior. Current treatment options include pharmaceutical stimulant medications that, although they work well for many, can cause side effects like appetite loss, sleep disturbances, and anxiety. Although still unknown, some researchers and physicians theorize ADHD may result from endocannabinoid system, suggesting the cannabinoids found in cannabis can replenish these low levels of endcannabinoids. Many patients and doctors are voicing their support for medical marijuana as an alternative treatment option, however only a few studies exist and more research is left to be desired. One of these studies from 2013 found some adults do in fact use marijuana to treat hyperactivity and impulsivity. Another study, from 2017, used sativex, a medication derived from cannabinoids, to improve hyperactivity and impulsivity in adults with ADHD. This study effectively treated the symptoms without interfering with cognition. Another German study from 2015 involving 30 patients who didn’t respond well to traditional medications like Adderall and Ritalin found cannabis improved sleep and reduced impulsivity in the majority of patients. Cannabis may not only help treat the symptoms associated with ADHD, but when used in combination with the traditional stimulant medications, it can help reduce the side effects associated with those treatments.

Using cannabis, however, does not come without its own risks. People with ADHD may be more likely to develop addiction and substance use disorders, and a study from 2016 found 34-46% of adults who sought treatment to reduce cannabis use were also diagnosed with ADHD. Another study from 2014 found people between 18-22 who were diagnosed with ADHD were more likely to be dependent on marijuana, alcohol, and nicotine, than their peers without. Cannabis use may also interfere with brain development in teens and young adults. One study from 2017 found people with ADHD who also had used cannabis had a thinner cortex around the areas of the brain that control memory, inhibition, and movement. Those with severe ADHD and those who had used cannabis the longest exhibited the thinnest cortex. Despite these studies, there has been difficulty establishing causation and determining the cause and effects of these outcomes. Most of these studies mentioned are correlational.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study: “Substantial” Clinical Evidence Supports Medical Marijuana Claims

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

A new literature review conducted by investigators from Harvard Medical School and New York Medical College and published in the journal Polish Archives of Internal Medicine suggests there is substantial clinical evidence supporting the claims that medical marijuana successfully treats chronic pain, pediatric epilepsy, and multiple sclerosis. The researchers analyzed randomized, placebo-controlled studies and found “moderate to high” quality evidence attesting to cannabis’ abilities to treat chronic and neuropathic pain, muscle spasticity, and seizures. They also found “moderate” quality evidence that cannabis could help target HIV/AIDS and gastrointestinal disorders. As access to medical marijuana continues to increase, researchers say, “Physicians must take the same steps with these patients as they would with prescribing any other medications to ensure that medical cannabis is recommended appropriately and as safely as possible. … Cannabis is often used for recreational purposes, but this should not affect how physicians view data collected on its efficacy at treating certain medical conditions.”

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

New Research Suggests Cannabis Could Help Heart Failure Patients

Photo Credit: Merry Jane

Photo Credit: Merry Jane

New research led by Dr. Oluwole Adegbala, a medical resident from the Englewood Hospital and Medical Center in New Jersey, suggests cannabis users are less likely to experience atrial fibrillation (A-fib) than non-users. A-fib is an irregularity of the heartbeat that can exacerbate the problems associated with heart failure. The study looked at a database with over 6 million patients suffering from heart failure who were hospitalized sometime between 2007 and 2014. Of those patients, 23,000 reported cannabis use without issues of dependency, while 1,200 cannabis users were considered dependent. The data was adjusted for external factors like age, socioeconomic status, and drug use. The non-dependent cannabis users were 18% less likely than non-users to experience A-fib, and 46% less likely to die in the hospital. Dependent users were 31% less likely to develop A-fib, and 58% less likely to pass away in the hospital. The team calls for further research before recommending cannabis treatment for patients with heart failure.

This information has been provided by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study: Medical Cannabis Registrants More Likely To Cease Using Opioids Compared To Non-Participants

Photo Credit: NORML

Photo Credit: NORML

According to a new study published in the journal PLOS One, registered medical marijuana patients who use the medication to treat chronic pain are more likely to reduce or cease use of opioids compared to those who are not enrolled and suffer from similar pain conditions. Researchers from the University of New Mexico analyzed prescription use over the course of 21 months in 37 medical marijuana pain patients and 29 non-registered pain patients. They found 83.8% of medical marijuana patients reduced daily opioid use while 44.8% of non-registered patients reduced daily use. Additionally, 40.5% of medical marijuana patients stopped use completely, while only 3.4% of non-registered patients stopped use. Those who enrolled in medical marijuana programs also reported a better quality of life. The authors concluded, “The clinically and statistically significant evidence of an association between MCP enrollment and opioid prescription cessation and reductions and improved quality of life warrants further investigations on cannabis as a potential alternative to prescription opioids for treating chronic pain.”

This information has been provided by NORML and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

CBD and Parkinson's Disease

Photo Credit: Flickr (https://bit.ly/2W1mdDU).

Photo Credit: Flickr (https://bit.ly/2W1mdDU).

Research suggests the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) may have the ability to treat symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease because of its neuroprotective and antipsychotic effects. It may also be able to help improve symptoms that interfere with sleep. One study from 2005 found CBD had neuroprotective benefits in animal models of Parkinson’s. The study believed these effects may be the result of CBD’s antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Through the studies, researchers suggested CBD could protect brains from progressive dopamine neuron loss. In 2007, the same researchers found CBD was most effective at protecting neurons if administered immediately after exposure to toxins.

Other studies have found CBD can improve movement impairments, psychosis, sleep disturbances, and quality of life for those with Parkinson’s disease. A study from 2017 found CBD improved movement impairments through blocking the receptor known as GPR6, which allows dopamine levels to increase. A 2009 trial published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology found six patients with Parkinson’s who were given 150 mg/day of CBD for four weeks exhibited remarkable improvements in their psychotic symptoms. The cannabinoid was also safe and well-tolerated. Another trial from 2014 which involved 21 patients found CBD improved quality of life, likely due to the cannabinoid’s antidepressant, anxiolytic, antipsychotic, and sedative effects. A series of case studies found daily doses of 75-300 mg CBD could reduce or eliminate REM sleep behavior disorder in patients.

THC may also help patients with Parkinson’s disease, and one study from 2014 found it improved movement dysfunction and overall movement deficiencies like tremor, rigidity, and slowed movements. It also helped with sleep disturbances and pain. THC on its own is a psychoactive cannabinoid, and can produce paranoia, anxiety, panic attacks, and increase heart rate which could lead to heart attack. So, the cannabinoid alone may not be the preferred cannabinoid for many patients. That said, using a combination of THC and CBD may be appropriate for those users who want the ultimate relief, as CBD buffers against the effects of THC and the two together can provide benefits and can target a wider range of symptoms.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Can Marijuana Help With Back Pain?

Photo Credit: WolfBlur/Pixabay

Photo Credit: WolfBlur/Pixabay

Marijuana’s analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties make it a potential candidate for reducing back pain. Currently, massages or chiropractic therapy, over-the-counter medications, and prescription medications like opioids are used to treat back pain. There are many clinical trials that suggest cannabis could be a powerful treatment option for pain reduction. One study found patients who inhaled vaporized cannabis three times a day over the course of five days significantly reduced their chronic pain. Another review of six clinical trials found “high quality” evidence that cannabis could provide powerful pain relief. One study found 34 patients with treatment-resistant chronic pain cannabis extracts significantly improved pain management. Indeed, most patients in the U.S. and Canada cite chronic pain as their main reason for using medical marijuana. Researchers believe cannabis is able to combat pain by interacting with the endocannabinoid system and blocking pain signals from being sent to the brain.

At a time when opioids are seemingly overprescribed and the opioid epidemic is rampant, medical marijuana is a welcomed player in pain management. One survey found 97% of participants successfully decreased their use of opioids thanks to marijuana. and 81% found cannabis was more effective on its own at treating their condition. Another survey found 63% of 166 respondents enrolled in Canada’s national medical cannabis system substituted prescriptions with cannabis, and 32% attributed their substitution to fewer side effects and better symptom management.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are CBD Topicals?

Photo Credit: PixaBay

Photo Credit: PixaBay

For patients who want localized relief, CBD topicals may be the most desirable option. CBD topicals include creams, lotions, salves, balms, and oils that are infused with CBD and can be applied to specific areas for targeted symptom relief. Through this vehicle, CBD is absorbed through the skin before interacting with the endocannabinoid system. In rodent models, CBD preparations successfully absorbed through the skin’s tissues and provided effective pain and inflammation relief in a dose-dependent manner. CBD topicals are suggested for pain and inflammation relief, so may be effective for conditions like psoriasis and arthritis. CBD can also be beneficial for skin’s overall health, and its powers as an antioxidant can keep the skin young healthy.

You can determine if topicals may be the most desirable vehicle for you with our app! Through the journaling function, you can monitor and titrate the different aspects of your dosing regimen to figure out what routine provides the best relief. Journaling daily will improve your results.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This post does not represent an endorsement on behalf of Leaf Science for CannaBest Medical products.

Cannabis Reduced Pain, Improved Quality Of Life For Cancer Patients In New Study

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

According to an Israeli study from Ben Gurion University and Soroka Medical Centre which involved hundreds of palliative care cancer patients, cannabis reduced pain and increased quality of life. Researchers looked at data from March 2015 to February 2017 which involved 1,152 cancer patients who used cannabis as a medicine. The patients first met with nurses, and then had follow-up phone interviews a month after and six months after. Before the treatment, 50.2% of patients experienced pain rated between 8-10, with 0 as painless and 10 as unimaginably painful. Six months later, only 5% still reported pain within the 8-10 range. Additionally, prior to cannabis treatment, only 19% of patients rated their quality of life as “good.” After six months of cannabis treatment, however, this percentage jumped to 70%. Although 1,152 patients participated in phone interviews, there were actually 3,357 patients who started the palliative cannabis care during the study. However, 903 patients died, 483 patients stopped cannabis treatment, and 339 reported feeling dizziness, dry mouth, and tiredness.

This reminds us that cannabis may not be the best treatment option for everyone. To determine whether or not cannabis treatment might work for you, our app can help! With this journaling tool, you can keep track of the dosing amount, cannabinoid ratio, and frequency of usage to document which combinations provide desirable relief and which combinations produce unwanted side effects. In this way, you can figure out the dosing routine with consistently makes you feel the way you want to feel. We recommend journaling daily for the most accurate results.

This information has been provided in part by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This post does not represent an endorsement by Civilized for any CannaBest Medical products.

What is Hemp CBD?

Photo Credit: Full Spectrum University / https://bit.ly/2Edi84e

Photo Credit: Full Spectrum University / https://bit.ly/2Edi84e

Hemp CBD is cannabidiol that is derived from the hemp plant as opposed to from the marijuana plant. CBD is a desired cannabinoid due to its ability to benefit a myriad of conditions while not producing any psychoactive side effects. Some parts of the hemp plant are federally legal, making it more widely accessible to patients than CBD derived from marijuana. There is more CBD present in marijuana due to its large amount of resin, so it is easier to extract CBD from marijuana and requires fewer plants. CBD, whether it comes from marijuana or from hemp, is the same molecule, but where it differs is the plant itself. Because of this, CBD taken from marijuana may contain other beneficial cannabinoids and terpenes that may not be present in hemp extractions.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Rates of marijuana, prescription opioid use higher among patients with cancer

Photo Credit: Health Mil

Photo Credit: Health Mil

A new study published in the journal Cancer has found rates of marijuana use have increased significantly among cancer patients, likely as a result of expanding cannabis access. The study looked at data from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to study self-reported marijuana and prescription use trends between 2005 and 2014 among cancer patients and those without cancer, who were the controls. The survey involved 19,604 respondents between 20-60 years old. The 826 patients with cancer averaged 47.4 years old and were 66.7% women, and the 1,652 patients noncancer controls with similar propensity scores averaged 46.7 years old and 66% were women. Compared to controls, more patients with cancer reported using marijuana in the past year (40.3% in cancer patients vs 38% in controls) and current marijuana use (8.7% in cancer patients vs 6.6% in controls). Between the 2005 and 20014, marijuana use among cancer patients increased 118%, while there was only a 12.5% increase among the controls. It’s important to note that while opioid use increased among both cancer patients and controls, researchers calculated opioid use based on prescription access and did not account for potential abuse.

Those with cancer were also more likely to use prescription opioids than those without. Chief of the central nervous system tumor and liver tumor services at UC San Diego Health Jona Hattangadi-Gluth explains, “Medical marijuana legalization has previously been associated with a reduction in hospitalizations related to opioid dependence or abuse, suggesting that if patients are, in fact, substituting marijuana for opioids, this may introduce an opportunity for reducing opioid-related morbidity and mortality… Of course, it will also be important to identify risks and adverse effects of marijuana, which has not previously been studied in large randomized clinical trials, given it’s scheduling as a class 1 controlled substance.” He continues, “These data provide the first insight into marijuana and opioid use over time in people with cancer across the United States… Prospective clinical trials are needed to quantify the efficacy of marijuana in cancer-specific pain as well as the risk [for] opioid misuse in this patient population.”

This information has been provided by Healio and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Can Cannabis Treat Lyme Disease?

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

Lyme disease develops out of a tick bite, and infects the body with an intractable bacteria. The disease can cause headaches, fever, fatigue, rashes, joint and nerve damage, and damage to the circulatory systems. It can also impact mental health. Because medical cannabis is known to act as an antiseptic and antibiotic, there are questions as to whether or not medical marijuana could be used to treat Lyme disease. There is little research on marijuana for Lyme disease, but one study from 2008 which was published in the Journal of Natural Products found cannabinoids were effective against antibiotic-resistant strains of MRSA, and researchers attested to the plant’s “powerful antibacterial agents.” Cannabis may also have the ability to treat the symptoms associated with the condition.

This information has been provided by High Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

More Than 20 Percent of Military Veterans Use Medical Marijuana

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

The American Legion recently conducted a study that stated 22% of veterans used medical marijuana to treat a mental or physical condition, and 39% know someone who uses medical cannabis for those purposes. Additionally, 81% of veterans support federal medical marijuana legalization. This information supports previous surveys which found veterans are more likely to use medical marijuana than the general public. This survey suggests that veterans are actively treating their conditions with medical marijuana, and that they would like medical marijuana access at a time when opioid prescriptions are too easily available.

This information has been brought to you in part by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Delving Into The Science Of How Cannabis Can Treat Migraines

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

Migraines are severe headaches that are thought to be produced by inflammation in the dura mater, or the brain’s outer casing. This inflammation may result from activation of the trigeminovascular system. MIgraines are also associated with dilated blood vessels, caused by neuropeptides and gas nitric oxide. The endocannabinoid is a key player in regulating the trigeminovascular system, and too few endocannabinoids are thought to increase the chance of developing a migraine. THC, the psychoactive cannabinoid in cannabis, may be able to reducing trigeminovascular activity and reducing the presence of neuropeptides and nitric oxide.

In one rodent model, in which researchers induced migraines in rats, THC effectively reduced symptoms if administered before their onset. In the study, researchers observed that the rats drastically reduced their time spent running on a wheel when in pain from migraine. However, when given THC, they spent more time on the wheel after the migraine was stimulated. If THC was administered after the onset of symptoms, it was not as effective. In a human study from 2016 which was published in Pharmacotherpy, 121 migraine sufferers averaging 10.4 migraines a month began using medical cannabis therapy. Within one to three years, the average migraine frequency was reduced to 4.6 a month, and over 10% actually eliminated their migraines with the therapy. Because of its fast onset of relief, smoking marijuana was considered the best vehicle of administration. Forty-eight percent of participants experienced relief, and side effects were minimal.

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.