What Are The Medical Benefits of CBD? - Part 3

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

Let’s continue our discussion of which conditions could benefit from CBD treatment by beginning with strokes. One animal study found CBD reduced two types of brain damage caused by a stroke, so much so that the outcomes of the group which had the stroke were comparable to the control group that did not. Its neuroprotective properties may help prevent brain damage and help patients heal. When administered before trauma, CBD can also protect against the damage caused by spinal cord injury, and aid in the healing process. Because of its neuroprotective effects, CBD may also be beneficial for those with traumatic brain injury, and studies suggest the cannabinoid protects neurons following injury, reduces the formation of scar tissue, and regenerates neuronal axons. CBD may also treat nicotine addiction, and in one study involving 24 smokers, some smokers received a placebo inhaler while some received a placebo inhaler. Smokers were instructed to use the inhaler when cigarette cravings struck. Those who received the placebo did no reduce their cigarette usage, while those who received CBD reduced their use by 40%.

The medication Sativex, which contains equal parts CBD and THC, has been found to effectively lower scores of spasticity related symptoms in patients with moderate to severe Multiple Sclerosis, even when these patients were previously treatment-resistant. CBD also reduced the production of cytokines, and activated an important biological pathway blocked by multiple sclerosis. Sativex may also help those with ADHD. CBD was also found to improve social interaction and reduce hyperactivity in rats with ADHD. CBD may also promote wakefulness in those who suffer from sleep disorders that cause excessive sleep. CBD also improved the quality of sleep in young patients who suffered from PTSD. CBD may also help patients heal from liver disease. One study found CBD reduces the neurological damage and cognitive impairments caused by toxins that remain in the blood as a result of liver failure. CBD also restored liver and brain function. Lastly, when taken before and after surgery, CBD increased the success rates of bone marrow transplants, and patients who received CBD were less likely to develop graft versus host disease.

This concludes our series examining the many uses for CBD. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of Marijuana? - Part 2.

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

In our previous post, we began to look at the conditions medical marijuana can help, but it doesn’t end there! Let’s continue that discussion now.

Medical marijuana may help those with inflammatory bowel disease, including conditions like Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Marijuana may improve symptoms to the point of remission and can help patients ween off of traditional medications. Marijuana may also help those with Parkinson’s disease, and patients have experienced relief from tremor severity and pain symptoms. Surprisingly, marijuana may also help those with asthma. Because THC acts as a bronchodilator, it opens up the pathways of the lungs, reduces spasms, and prevents over-inflation of the lungs. Not surprisingly, marijuana is known to stimulate appetite, which can be extremely beneficial for patients suffering from conditions like AIDS and cancer, where appetite loss is a common symptom of the conditions and side effect of the disorders’ treatments. On the other hand, marijuana can also help combat obesity. Although it is able to increase appetite, marijuana is still associated with a smaller waistline and lower cholesterol in users than in non-users, and it has been found to better manage glucose levels.

As mentioned in the previous post in relation to cancer, medical marijuana is effective in the treatment of nausea and vomiting, and it can be so effective at treating this common side effect associated with chemotherapy and HIV/AIDS treatment regimens that it can allow patients to continue with these unpleasant treatments. Medical marijuana can also improved the recovery and survival rates of patients with traumatic brain injury. Similarly, researchers believe phytocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids could improve the outcomes of spinal cord injury, as well, due to the fact they have observed increases in the body’s natural endocannabinoid production following injury in an attempt to prevent damage.

Thanks for following up with today’s post on the medical benefits of medical marijuana. Still, there are so many more conditions where medical marijuana is useful! We’ll continue our discussion of more conditions in the next post. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Cannabinoids and Traumatic Brain Injury Treatment

Photo: MassRoots

Photo: MassRoots

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) refers to an injury sustained from a physical trauma or blow to the head. Recent controlled studies have found cannabinoids could help treat traumatic brain injury through its neuro-protective properties. In one study from 2014, patients with severe TBI who were administered THC treatments experienced significantly higher survival rates than those who were not given THC. In the group given THC, only 2 patients (2.4%) died, while in the control group, 42 patients (11.5%) died. Following a trauma, the body releases harmful mediators leading to toxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation, but cannabis has been shown to offer protection to the neural system, which in turn reduces brain damage. In mice with brain injury, CBD reduced brain swelling. In pigs with TBI, CBD reduced brain inflammation and oxidative stress. In newborn humans with brain injuries, CBD offered neuroprotective benefits.

One study found patients with THC in their systems prior to suffering a brain injury were less likely to die from the TBI than those who had nothing in their system. Israeli researchers confirmed these findings, suggesting the administration of THC before or shortly after injury can prevent long-term brain damage. Authors of the study write, “Administering just a fraction of the amount of THC that would be found in a typical marijuana joint induces chemical processes necessary to protect critical brain cells while preserving long-term cognitive function.”

This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study: Cannabinoids Show Treatment Potential For Traumatic Brain Injury

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study conducted by Lesley D. Schurman and Aron H. Lichtman, which can be found in Frontiers in Pharmacology, suggests cannabinoids may have the power to benefit traumatic brain injury (TBI). Researchers reviewed preclinical studies that looked at the potential for cannabinoids to reduce the neural damage associated with TBI, and found cannabinoids interacted with the endocannabinoid system to regulate its immune response in order to prevent brain damage caused by a TBI. Following an injury, the body releases mediators like proinflammatory cytokines that can be harmful and lead to oxidative stress, inflammation, and excitoxicity, but this study suggests cannabinoids can modulate this response. The researchers conclude, “The [endocannabinoid] system, through release of its endogenous ligands or by changes in cannabinoid receptor constitutive activity possesses promise in the treatment of diverse TBI pathway.”

This study supports the findings of other studies that similarly suggest cannabinoids, like both THC and CBD, have neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties that improve the survival rates of brain cells following a TBI. Other research has shown when cannabinoids are administered right after injury, they prevent the release of harmful mediators that cause brain damage.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc, and you can find the text of Schurman and Lichtman's study here. This post has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study: Cannabis-Based Medicines As Potential Treatments For Traumatic Brain Injuries

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

A new study from The American Surgeon suggests patients with detectable levels of THC in their bodies are less likely to die as a result of traumatic brain injury (TBI) than those who do not. The retrospective looked at 446 cases of TBI  over a course of three years at the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, CA. Of the TBI patients sampled, 18.4% had toxicology reports positive for the presence of THC, and the death rate for all cases examined was 9.9%. After adjusting for differences that may confound results, the death rate for TBI patients who had no traceable amounts of THC was around 11.5%, but for those who had traces of THC in their bodies, the death rate was only 2.4% (approximately 80 less than THC-negative patients). 

Unfortunately, the nature of retrospective studies limits the potential for determining the cause and effect relationship between THC and the survival rate of TBI patients, and the specific variables regarding cannabis use remain unknown. That being said, these results support other evidence that suggests endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids can prevent or halt brain injury.

This information has been provided by Medical Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

MMJ for Traumatic Brain Injury

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) are dysfunctions of the brain caused by physical harm to the head. Mild concussions may only cause temporary brain cell dysfunction, but more serious ones can cause brain tissue to bruise, tear, or bleed, which can result in long-term complications, like altered consciousness, seizures, fluid buildup, blood vessel damage, nerve damage, and intellectual, communication, sensory, and behavioral problems, or death. Symptoms vary and may arise immediately or become apparent later, but some include loss of consciousness, headaches, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, sleeping difficulties, increased sleepiness, dizziness, sensory problems, blurred vision, ear ringing, and memory and concentration problems, mood changes, and depression. Marijuana may be able to limit brain damage and improve recovery if administered right after the trauma occurs.

Cannabis protects the neural system, and in turn reduces the amount of brain damage that follows. Studies suggest THC and CBD interact with the endocannabinoid system to prevent the release of damaging pro-inflammatory cytokines following brain trauma. THC and CBD also act on the cannabinoid receptors to stimulate the release of minocycline, which reduces brain swelling and neurological impairment, and diffuses injuries to the brain's axons. Four animal studies found cannabinoids reduced brain swelling, excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, infarct volume, and brain cell death, and improved overall recovery. Even in newborn babies with brain injuries, cannabinoids were able to effectively provide neuroprotection. Lastly, a study found that patients who had consumed THC prior to experiencing a traumatic brain injury were less likely to die as a result. 

This information has been brought to you by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

 

Why Cannabis Helps People With Traumatic Brain Injuries

Photo Credit: Civilized.

Photo Credit: Civilized.

Medical marijuana is increasingly being considered to help those who suffer from traumatic brain injuries (TBI), which would be beneficial for the 1.4 million Americans who suffer from TBI every year. Both anecdotal and scientific evidence suggest cannabis has neuroprotective benefits, and one study from The American Surgeon found patients who tested positive for THC in a sample of over 400 adults with TBI were associated with a higher rate of survival post-injury. This evidence has been supported with animal studies.

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Understanding Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) - Part 4

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Today we are continuing our discussion of THC in relation to various conditions and diseases.

THC can help Parkinson's sufferers by preventing the damage caused by free radicals while also activating receptors that encourage mitchondria formation. It also improves motor disability and impairments, tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia, sleep, and pain. There has been a lot of discussion lately as to whether or not cannabis can help in the treatment of PTSD. Research suggests the administration of THC, specifically, shortly after a traumatic event can help prevent the development of PTSD-like symptoms. THC not only lowers the pain associated with sickle-cell anemia, but also minimizes the commonly resulting vascular occlusion and tissue infarction.

THC helps those suffering from spinal cord diseases by improving pain, sleep, bladder function, spasticity, muscle twitching, and depression. It also treats spinal cord injuries by reducing swelling and compression lesion volume, preserving white matter and myelin, and improving locomotor function recovery. By activating CB1 and CB2 receptors and simulating the release of minocycline, THC is able to reduce brain swelling and neurological impairment in those who suffer a traumatic brain injury. This diffuses further injuries to the brain's axons following the injury. One study found that those who consume THC before the injury occurs are less like to die as a result. 

This concludes our discussion of THC for the treatment of varying conditions and diseases. This information has been brought to you by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Pets for Vets: Helping Veterans One Paw at a Time

Sponsored Content By Pets for Vets

Sponsored Content By Pets for Vets

Military personnel face unimaginable hardships to protect this country while on active duty, but sometimes returning home from service is just as difficult. As many as 20% of veterans suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and many others face other mental and physical problems due to their time in service. This makes it difficult for veterans to assimilate back into civilian life, and this is why organizations like Pets for Vets find it so important to care for veterans and thank them for all they've done. Studies have shown animals have the ability to improve mental and physical health by reducing stress, depression, and anxiety, which are symptoms many veterans face. Pets for Vets recognize this potential, and by providing shelter dogs and companion animals to veterans they hope to treat the emotional wounds caused by the time spent overseas. 

When veterans return from service, many are prescribed pharmaceutical pain killers to combat PTSD, Traumatic Brain Injury, chronic pain, and more. Cannabis has the potential to reduce the use of opioid based medications, thereby reducing the medication's negative side effects and decreasing the rate of addiction and fatal overdoses. Clinical studies have shown medical cannabis is not only effective in the treatment of chronic pain, but that it is also a safe therapeutic alternative. While there is still a vast need for clinical research, investigators have found the endocannabinoid system is integrally related to memory extinction, which is a normal and healthy process of removing associations from stimuli. Many veterans who suffer from PTSD respond to stimuli that remind them of a specific trauma, even when it is no longer appropriate to do so. This suggests cannabis, which is able to interact with the endocannabionid system, can aid memory extinction and disconnect stimuli from their past traumatic events.

The power of an animal's companionship combined with the therapeutic benefits of cannabinoid therapy may help veterans significantly reduce their use of pharmaceutical medications so they can live a healthier and happier lifestyle. We thank Pets for Vets for all they've done for our military veterans, and we are excited to see what's to come from this exceptional organization. Want to learn more about Pets for Vets? Visit their website here.