Studies Part 2 - Low Doses of THC Promote Healthy Brain Aging.

Photo Credit: Tumisu (https://bit.ly/2mfK9lF).

Photo Credit: Tumisu (https://bit.ly/2mfK9lF).

To continue our series in which we discuss a new study daily, today we will look at the cannabinoid THC as it pertains to brain health. It’s thought that overtime, a weakened endocannabinoid system and a reduction in cannabinoid receptors may contribute to a decline in brain health and cognition. Now, in a 2017 study that was published in Nature Medicine, a research team in Germany found they could prevent cognitive decline in mice by regularly activating CB1 receptors with low doses of THC. Researchers gave low doses of THC to both young and old mice for 28 days, and then tested the subjects’ learning, memory, and cognitive flexibility. Young mice who received the cannabinoid were impaired in their performance. On the other hand, the older mice who received THC were instead performing at a comparable level to the young mice who were were not treated with the cannabinoid. Older mice would usually perform poorly on these tests. Researchers found THC manipulated the patterns to which certain genes are expressed, and increased the number of brain connections that were created in the hippocampus, an area important in learning, memory regulation, stress and anxiety.

This information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Cannabinoid Receptor-1 (CB-1) & THC

Photo Credit: High Times

Photo Credit: High Times

We know that the cannabinoids in cannabis are able to produce their therapeutic relief by interacting directly or indirectly with the cannabinoid receptors found within the endocannabinoid system, but how exactly does this work? Well, for the cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the chemical can bind directly the cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB-1). The CB-1 receptor is part of a class of proteins called the g-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are responsible for managing cellular signal transduction to communicate between cells. The proteins are so important, in fact, that they account for 60% of drug targets. The CB-1 receptor is involved in combating varying diseases and abnormalities, including Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, and obesity.

Researchers have recently discovered that their are two types of agonists that bind to and activate the CB-1 receptors, one being very similar in structure to THC. With this information, we will not only be able to better understand how the receptor moves, but also why THC and other cannabinoids are able to produce such positive effects within the body.

This information has been provided by High Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

The Differences Between THC and CBD

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Of the more than 100 cannabinoids found in marijuana, the cannabinoids most commonly associated with the plant are Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD). These cannabinoids interact with the Endocannabinoid System (ECS), a system which is known to regulate pain, appetite, mood, memory, immune response, sleep, and cellular level life cycles. THC will bind directly to CB1 and CB2 receptors in the ECS, with a higher affinity for CB1 receptors, while CBD acts as an indirect antagonist of cannabinoid receptor agonists, and even binds with non-cannabinoid receptors.

Many medical marijuana patients opt for CBD in their routines due to the fact it does not produce psychoactive or euphoric effects like THC. In fact, for those who desire the therapeutic relief that THC offers, CBD can actually buffer against its psychoactive effects, so that the patient can experience symptom relief without unwanted side effects. THC may produce side effects like memory impairment, lowered reaction time, increased heart rate, coordination problems, dry mouth, and red eye. One can’t overdose from THC, but adolescence who consume high amounts of THC may experience long-term psychiatric side effects. CBD, on the other hand, is considered all around well-tolerated and safe, and the only potential mild side effects include dry mouth, light-headedness, and drowsiness. Producers can produce medical marijuana strains with different cannabinoid compositions tailored to the specific needs of patients. That said, many marijuana strains, especially in today’s world of high potency marijuana, contain higher amounts of THC while hemp contains very little THC and strong concentrations of CBD.

This information has been brought to you by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

All About Cannabinoids - Part 2

Photo Credit: Toomaj F. Bungs | pexels (https://bit.ly/2I6rtyq)

Photo Credit: Toomaj F. Bungs | pexels (https://bit.ly/2I6rtyq)

In the previous post, we introduced the powerful chemicals in cannabis known as cannabinoids. Now, we will discuss in detail the unique properties found in cannabis.

Most people are aware of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is a cannabinoid that binds with the CB1 receptor in the brain and is responsible for producing the psychoactive effect of feeling “high.” THC is one of the more prevalent cannabinoids in marijuana, and it may be beneficial for patients who need to reduce nausea and vomiting, and pain. Although THC can offer therapeutic benefits, side effects include rapid heart rate, bloodshot eyes, dry mouth, dizziness, sedation, short-term memory, impaired concentration, and in severe cases, panic attack, hallucinations, and vomiting when consumed in large amounts. The other most well known cannabinoid is cannabidiol (CBD). CBD is popular for medicinal purposes because it does not produce a psychoactive effect, and can even buffer against the psychoactive effects of THC. CBD can help those who suffer from anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia, and most famously, pediatric epilepsy. It provides neuroprotective benefits and is known reduce pain and inflammation.

The cannabinoids cannabinol (CBN) is known for its antibacterial and analgesic properties, anticonvulsant and sedative effects, and appetite stimulation. Cannabichromene (CBC), like CBD, does not produce psychoactive effects. CBC acts as an analgesic, an antidepressant, and has antibacterial and antifungal properties. The cannabinoid could help treat those with acne or diarrhea. Cannabigerol (CBG) is a building block for all other cannabinoids, and it is known for providing pain relief, antifungal and antibacterial effects, reduce inflammation, and neuroprotective effects.

This concludes our short series on the cannabinoids in marijuana. To learn more, visit the Leaf Science website. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Can Marijuana Help With Nausea?

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Marijuana has long been promoted as an antiemetic, making it a viable option for those seeking relief from nausea. The cannabinoid THC is cannabis’ main active ingredient responsible for providing nausea relief by interacting with cannabinoid receptors in the brain that manage nausea and vomiting.. In one study, healthy volunteers received ipecac, a substance that stimulates vomiting, alongside THC. It was found that THC significantly reduced symptoms of queasiness and vomiting.

The antiemetic benefits provided by medical marijuana make it desirable for cancer and AIDS patients who seek relief from the nauseating side effects of their traditional treatment regimens. One study found patients undergoing chemotherapy experienced an absence of nausea and vomiting through the use of cannabinoids, and reported it as preferable to other treatments. Another study analyzed 30 studies of more than 1300 patients and found cannabinoid-based medications were more effective than other antiemetics in treating side effects of chemotherapy. Studies have also found cannabis’ nausea relief can help AIDS patients continue with their antiretroviral treatments, and THC can help stimulate appetite to combat weight loss.

This information has been brought to you by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Medical Marijuana and Epilepsy

Photo Credit: Leaf Science/ShutterStock

Photo Credit: Leaf Science/ShutterStock

There is growing evidence suggesting medical marijuana could be a powerful agent in combatting epilepsy, even in its most severe and treatment-resistant forms, and its symptoms. Marijuana acts as an anticonvulsant, and produces antiepileptic effects through its interactions with both the CB1 and CB2 receptors. In recent years, GW Pharmaceuticals has been conducting experiments that have proven their pure CBD extract effectively reduces the frequency and severity of seizures in severe treatment-resistant forms of epilepsy.

Most researcher attribute cannabis’ therapeutic effects for epilepsy to the cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD). CBD is a non-psychoactive, making it appropriate for use in pediatric care, and it produces very few mild side effects, like dry mouth, diarrhea, sleepiness, and fatigue. CBD can work on its own or work as a powerful supplement to other epilepsy medications, but it may interfere with the processing of other medications in the liver, so patients who choose to use the medication should research its interactions with other medications before beginning a CBD regimen. There is less information regarding the use of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) for epilepsy, which is a cannabinoid known for its psychocactive activity, and some reports suggest it may exacerbate symptoms. That said, THC may also act as an anticonvulsant, so some researchers think including some amounts of it in one’s regimen may provide optimal relief. In one study, ratios of 20:1 CBD to THC produced maximum seizure relief in patients. More research is needed to better understand which cannabinoids and the amount of each can produce the best relief with the lowest side effects.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

New Study: Marijuana with CBD Has Less Long-Term Risks Than Other Forms

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

Many people may desire the use of medical cannabis but fear any negative side effects. With cannabidiol (CBD) gaining in popularity for its high-safety profile and lack of psychoactive side effects, people wonder whether or not the cannabinoid is worth the hype. According to a new study, led by Dr. Ken Mackie from Indiana University, the answer is yes. In the study, scientists injected two groups of mice with tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), with one group only receiving the THC and the other also receiving CBD. Mice who received only THC experienced greater memory impairment and anxiety over the long term, while those who also received CBD did not experience these effects.

Previous studies surrounding THC and CBD have been mixed, but Mackie believes his study is more accurate because “this is the first study in a rigorously controlled animal model to find that CBD appears to protect the brain against the negative effects of chronic THC.” He continues to explain that this experiment "suggests that strains of cannabis with similar levels of CBD and THC would pose significantly less long-term risk due to CBD's protective effect against THC."

More research is left to be desired to understand how CBD is able to exhibit these effects. This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

PTSD, Insomnia, and Cannabis: What’s the Evidence Say?

Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Many of those who suffer from PTSD may suffer from insomnia as a result of the disorder, and it is said that psychotherapy medications and sleep aids are commonly prescribed to treat PTSD-related insomnia. However, these treatment regimens can produce a wide range of negative side effects. Now, research suggests medical cannabis may be able to provide relief for sleep-related issues without producing the unwanted side effects. According to a study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institute of Health (NIH), and the pharmaceutical company Sanofi-Aventis, consuming THC helped subjects to fall asleep easily and quickly.

Another study headed by Dr. Kenneth Cousens from the Napa State Hospital, California, and Dr. Alberto DiMascio, Director of Psychopharmacology at the Department of Mental Health, Boston State Hospital, suggests medical marijuana not only helps people fall asleep quicker, but that their quality of sleep is better and they are able to stay asleep longer. In addition to research, there is plenty of anecdotal evidence suggesting medical cannabis is much more preferable to the various combinations of medications that the VA currently relies on to treat the problems associated with PTSD.

This information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Cannabis Could Be Better For Migraines Than Pharmaceuticals: Study

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

A new study conducted by researchers at the Interuniversity Center in Florence, Italy, suggests pills containing THC and CBD can reduce migraine pain by 43.5%. Additionally, the medication can help curb stomach-aches and muscle pain. The study involved 79 migraine and cluster headache sufferers who were given an oral dose of medication containing both THC and CBD over the course of three months. Those who suffered from cluster headaches received either  200mg THC-CBD or 25 mg amitriptyline, while migraine sufferers received 200 mg THC-CBD after the onset of acute pain.

Researchers determined the cannabinoid medication was slightly more effective at curbing the frequency and severity of cluster headaches by cutting incidents by 40.4%. In comparison, amitriptyline cut headaches by 40.1%. Cannabis also cut the severity of migraine pain by 43.5%. Lead researcher Dr. Maria Nicolodi explains, “We were able to demonstrate that cannabinoids are an alternative to established treatments in migraine prevention... That said, they are only suited for use in the acute treatment of cluster headaches in patients with a history of migraine from childhood on.”

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Researchers Identify the Perfect Dose of THC to Help You Relax

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Research has shown that cannabis may have the ability to help you relax, however taking too high of a dose containing THC can actually have the opposite effect and exacerbate paranoia, anxiety, and stress. Now, a team of researchers from the University of Chicago have found the optimal amount of THC to help stimulate relaxation. The team experimented with varying doses of THC and monitored how subjects responded to stressful situations. The 42 participants were first divided into three subgroups, of which one received an oral dose of 12.5mg THC, another received 7.5mg THC, and the last received placebo. It is important to note that even this higher dose of THC is less than what one might receive from a dispensary, with half a joint often containing between 33 - 39mg THC. 

After receiving their dose, participants were placed in stressful situations, like giving speeches or taking oral math tests in front of interviewers while being recorded on camera and simultaneously watching this recording live. The subjects' performances were rated, and they were also asked to rate their levels of stress. Researchers determined that, in comparison to placebo, the lower dose of THC “reduced the duration of negative emotional responses to acute psychosocial stress, and participants’ post-task appraisals of how threatening and challenging they found the stressor.” The higher dose, on the other hand, “produced small but significant increases in anxiety, negative mood and subjective distress at baseline before the tasks began.” The anxiety and negative thoughts continued throughout the test. Researchers concluded low doses of THC are ideal for relaxation, which could have beneficial implications for those who suffer from various anxiety disorders. 

Further research that isn't limited to oral THC and that includes a variety of cannabinoids combinations is desired for more accurate data that is applicable to what a patient would encounter in everyday life. This information has been provided by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study: Low-Dose THC Can Relieve Stress, but Too Much May Do the Opposite

Photo Credit: High Times

Photo Credit: High Times

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Chicago have determined small amounts of THC may have the ability to relieve stress, but that too much of the cannabinoid can instead exacerbate symptoms. The study involved 42 healthy volunteers between 18 and 40 years old who had previously tried marijuana. They were then divided into three groups and given capsules containing either 7.5 mg THC, 12.5 mg THC, or placebo. Neither participants nor investigators were aware of who was in which dosing group. The doses were said to produce the same effects as taking a few puffs from a joint. The study took place over the course of two four-hour sessions separated by five days, in which each participant took two capsules and then were interviewed and asked to complete a "reliably stress-inducing" math task. In the second session, the participants discussed their favorite movie or book and then played solitaire. During and after, they assessed their own stress levels and feelings while their heart rates and their blood pressure and cortisol levels were monitored and measured at intervals. 

The low dose group reported less stress after the psychosocial test than the placebo groups, and their stress levels dropped faster. The higher dosing THC group reported negative moods both before and after performing their tasks, and they were more likely to rate the psychosocial tasks as challenging or threatening. Lead researcher Emma Childs explained, “We found that THC at low doses reduced stress, while higher doses had the opposite effect, underscoring the importance of dose when it comes to THC and its effects... Studies like these… are extremely important, considering the widespread use of cannabis for both medical and non-medical purposes.” Still, Child believes there are not enough significant studies due to regulatory obstacles, and hopes to see more scientific foundation behind the medicinal claims surrounding medical marijuana. 

This information has been provided by High Times Magazine and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study Suggests CBD and THC Help Treat Neuroblastoma in Kids

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study from Israel suggests cannabinoids like THC and CBD could mitigate the multiplication of neuroblastoma, which is primarily a childhood disease. In the study, which was published in Current Oncology, researchers found CBD and THC were able to impede the growth of tumors by reducing their viability and invasiveness, and induce apoptosis. Of the two cannabinoids' anti-tumor effects, CBD was found to be more active.

Researchers used culture and animal models to test the effects of these cannabinoids on neuroblastoma. In the culture models, cells were treated with either cannabinoid or left untreated. In the animal models, mice were induced with tumors via subcutaneous injection, and were then injected with 20 mg/kg THC or 20 mg/kg CBD or left untreated for 14 days. Both models investigated the tumors by measuring and testing viability, cell cycle distribution, growth rate, cell invasiveness, and apoptotic cell death rate. Researchers conclude, “Our findings about the activity of CBD in [neuroblastoma] support and extend previous findings about the anti-tumor activities of CBD in other tumors and suggest that cannabis extracts enriched in CBD and not in THC could be suitable for the development of novel non-psychotropic therapeutic strategies in [neuroblastoma]."

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Marijuana and Anxiety: A Guide

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Marijuana may be able to help relieve anxiety and stress, but this relief is largely dependent on the cannabis strain's composition and on the individual's drug tolerance, pre-existing conditions, and other environmental factors. Cannabis may provide a safe and effective alternative to the pharmaceuticals traditionally used to treat anxiety, and now studies are beginning to backup the anecdotal claims to its efficacy. A study from Canada found that within 90 days of prescription medical cannabis use, 40% of patients treating anxiety and pain were able to stop their use of benzodiazebines. Another study from Vanderbilt University in 2014 found smoking marijuana increased the presence of endocannabinoids, which are naturally-occurring brain chemicals that can decrease as a result of chronic stress. Some researchers theorize reduced endocannabinoids could potentially cause anxiety disorders. Additionally, marijuana's role in memory extinction has led experts to believe it could be suitable in the treatment of PTSD. 

While cannabis may be able to help treat anxiety disorders, it has also been known to cause short-term anxiety and paranoia in some instances, especially when the individual is new to the plant or consumes large doses. Anxiety can also occur after abruptly stopping cannabis use. That said, studies have found only a small association between cannabis use and anxiety disorders, and some have deemed it only a "minor risk factor" in developing symptoms of anxiety. Many find THC helps anxiety for some, while it exacerbates its symptoms of others. CBD acts on serotonin receptors so that it can help regenerate brain cells that are lost or damaged due to chronic anxiety and depression. The ratio these two cannabinoids can determine whether cannabis helps or worsens symptoms, and strains that are higher in CBD are less likely to cause anxiety. In addition to cannabinoids, terpenes found in cannabis can also influence relief. Some terpenes that may help treat anxiety include Myrcene, Linalool, β-Caryophyllene, and Terpinolene.

When trying out cannabis for anxiety, knowing your optimal dose is crucial, and our app can help! Document your regimen daily in the journaling section of our app so that you can see which strain of cannabis and dosing amount provides the most effective relief. This information has been provided in part by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study: Cannabis Reverses Aging Processes in Brain

Photo Credit: High Times

Photo Credit: High Times

Scientists from the University of Bonn have found daily doses of THC in aging mice actually reverses cognitive decline, so that they were better able to complete cognitive tasks like navigating a maze. That said, THC had the reverse effect in younger mice, and actually hindered their cognitive abilities. The study, which was published in Nature Medicine, has implications for the potential treatment and prevention of dementia. Lead researcher Andras Bilkei-Gorzo says, "If we can rejuvenate the brain so that everybody gets five to 10 more years without needing extra care, then that is more than we could have imagined.”

This information has been provided by High Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Daily THC Microdosing Could Help the Elderly Improve Memory Function

Photo Credit: Merry Jane

Photo Credit: Merry Jane

A new study coming from Germany on the effects of cannabis on the brainpower of mice suggests microdosing marijuana may help the elderly improve their memory function. The study, which has been published in the journal Nature Medicine, examined cognitive function in a control group of mice and a group of mice given a daily microdose of THC. The active compound in cannabis helped the brain make connections in the hippocampus, which is responsible for memory function. The study was performed several times on different age groups of mice, including 2 month-olds (adolescents), 12 month-olds (middle aged), and 18 month-olds (elderly). For the youngest mice, those who given microdoses of THC were outperformed by those who were not, but in the two older groups, the microdosing mice navigated mazes and recognized each other at a better rate than the control groups. The dose of THC was equivalent to about 3 mg/day for humans. Researchers hope to continue these studies in human trials. 

This information has been provided by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Terpene Profile: What Is Myrcene?

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

The medical benefits of marijuana can be attributed to its cannabinoids and terpenes. While the cannabinoids are well researched, the terpenes are a little less known. Researchers have found at least 100 terpenes can be found in cannabis, and one of the more abundant of these compounds is Myrcene. Myrcene is a small monoterpene that can be found in the essential oils of a variety of plants, including cannabis. Myrcene is thought to provide a "couch-lock" effect, it lowers resistance across the blood-to-brain brain barrier, and it acts to increase the saturation levels of CB1 receptors, which react to THC. Myrcene has anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, sedative, and pain relieve properties. It may be able to mitigate the effects of diabetes and prevent peptic ulcer disease, as well as treat pain, muscle tension, and insomnia.

This information is brought to you by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

3 Benefits of THC

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

While THC is known for producing a psychoactive "high" for recreational users, medical marijuana patients and researchers recognize THC also has medicinal properties to it. THC is a cannabinoid that occurs naturally in the cannabis plant, and that is able to connect to receptors throughout the endocannabinoid system and in the brain and immune system. THC is already known for its ability to increase appetite, but this can be especially effective for treating nausea and vomiting and stimulating appetite in patients suffering from HIV or cancer. It has also effectively increased appetite in patient suffering from illnesses like anorexia or Alzheimer's. This helps users maintain a stable body mass.

Recently, CBD has been gaining a lot of attention for its efficacy in pain management, which could have a beneficial impact on the opioid epidemic. What isn't as well known, however, is that THC also has analgesic properties. Studies have found THC effectively treats pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, headaches, menstrual pain, chronic bowel inflammation, and nerve damage. A study from the University of Michigan involving 185 patients found medical cannabis users experienced a 45% increase in their quality of life. Lastly, it is thought THC may help those who suffer from anxiety or depression. THC has fewer side effects than the commonly prescribed anti-depressant medications, and it can increase serotonin levels which helps relieve depression. 

This information has been brought to you by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

 

Studies Suggest Cannabis May Treat Herpes

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Once infected with the herpes simplex virus (HSV), the virus lasts for life. Herpes is a prevalent virus, and according to the CDC, one in six Americans between 14 and 49 are infected with the virus. While outbreaks may be rare or infrequent, they consist of painful blisters and sores on the mouth and lips (HSV 1) or in the genital area (HSV 2) that can only be treated with ointments and creams when outbreaks occur.

Now, studies are showing topicals including cannabinoids might be the a valuable treatment option for patients with herpes. In 1980, a study published in the Journal of General Virology found THC stopped both herpes viruses from replicating and spreading. Later, in 1991, a study found THC suppressed viability of herpes by 80%, making it less infective and slowing its replication. Lastly, in 2004, in attempting to better understand how cannabis fights herpes, scientists found THC targets viral/cellular mechanisms, so that it works at the cellular level to combat herpes. Various cannabis oils and infused topicals can be applied to the skin to act transdermally and act at the cellular level. While THC specifically helps prevent the spread of herpes, topicals that also contain CBD can help reduce pain and inflammation.

This information has been brought to you by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study: Oral THC Safe and Effective for Treatment of Spasticity in Pediatric Patients

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

According to clinical data published in the European Journal of Pediatric Neurology, the oral synthetic THC Dronabinol is both safe and effective when treating refractory spasticity in pediatric patients. The study coming from the University of Dusseldorf, Germany, has found two daily doses of oral THC effectively reduced spasticity without producing serious or enduring side effects in the majority of 16 adolescents who suffered from complex neurological conditions. The treatment regimen lasted about 181 days, and the study is one of the first of its kind to look at the safety and efficacy of THC for treating adolescent patient populations. Authors said of their results, "Our data shows evidence that dronabinol can effectively be administered over a longer period of time to... young children... without severe side effects or aggravation of pre-existing concurrent conditions." 

This information has been brought to you by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also find the abstract of this study here

FDA Approves Liquid Marijuana for AIDS and Cancer Patients

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

There is now a new treatment option available to AIDS and cancer patients now that the FDA has approved of a liquid synthetic version of the cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabidiol (THC). The liquid THC synthetic, which will be sold under the name Syndros, could help treat "anorexia associated with weight loss in patients with AIDS, and nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy in patients who have failed to respond adequately to conventional antiemetic treatments.” This new form of synthetic THC can be swallowed easily and is designed to be quickly absorbed, which is considered an improvement from the other synthetic cannabinoids that already exist like dronabinol. 

This medication is easily accessible as a Schedule III substance, meaning it has low risk for abuse and has medicinal value. That being said, for those who can access medical marijuana, there are benefits to using the whole natural cannabis plant due to its varieties of cannabinoids and terpenes that work synergistically in what is known as the entourage effect. Even Dr. Sanjay Gupta has said of marinol vs. whole plant cannabis, "When the drug became available in the mid-1980s, scientists thought it would have the same effect as the whole cannabis plant. But it soon became clear that most patients preferred using the whole plant to taking Marinol... Researchers began to realize that other components, such as CBD, might have a larger role than previously realized.”

This information has been provided by High Times Magazine and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.