What Are The Medical Benefits of Marijuana? - Part 3.

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

In the last post, we continued to look at the conditions where medical marijuana is effective. It’s not done yet! We’ll continue the discussion below.

While the relationship between marijuana and heart disease is complicated, and cannabis can actually exacerbate symptoms in some users by increasing heart rate and blood pressure, scientists have found low doses of THC can reduce damage from heart attacks, and CBD can be used as a treatment for cardiovascular disease. Cannabis may also reduce the severity and lessen the impact of a stroke. Although most studies thus far have been animal studies, researchers believe medical cannabis may help treat the symptoms of Huntington’s disease, and one human study found synthetic THC improved motor-related symptoms of the disorder. Animal studies have found cannabis may slow the progression of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and many properties of cannabis could help reduce pain, relax muscles, reduce saliva, stimulate appetite, and induce sleep. Synthetic cannabinoids also improved pain symptoms in fibromyalgia patients, and one survey found patients actually preferred cannabis to any approved pharmaceutical medication.

New support is starting to accumulate for the use of marijuana for Alzheimer’s disease. Marijuana may be able to do so by reducing inflammation and the formation of plaques. Marijuana has been found to alleviate tics and be well tolerated in patients with Tourette’s syndrome. Cannabis topicals are now offered as effective treatments for varying skin disorders, and its anti-inflammatory and anti-itching properties make it effective for the treatment of acne, dermatitis, and psoriasis. Marijuana may also help those who suffer from sleep disorders like insomnia and sleep apnea fall asleep quicker and improve breathing during sleep. Lastly, and probably most well known, is medical marijuana’s ability to treat epilepsy. Specifically, the cannabinoid CBD is well-tolerated and effective in reducing the frequency and severity of seizures.

There are even many more conditions to talk about regarding medical marijuana treatment. Keep reading as we conclude our discussion in the next post! This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

New Study Suggests Cannabis Reduces the Risk of Stroke

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study led by Dr. Francesca Filbey, director of Cognitive Neuroscience of Cognitive Research in Addictive Disorders at the Center for Brain Health, which was published in the journal of Neuropsychopharmacology suggests prolonged use of cannabis containing THC may improve oxygen and blood flow to the brain, and therefore reduce the risk of clots that lead to a stroke. The team of researchers from the University of Texas at Dallas looked at the regional brain blood oxygenation and metabolism in 74 chronic cannabis users and 101 non-users over the course of 60 days. The cannabis users reported more than 5,000 usages throughout their life, and reported daily use for at least 60 days before the study. All participants had to abstain from use for 72 hours before the study to ensure the scientists were analyzing chronic effects as opposed to acute effects. Each participant also had their THC metabolite levels measured through urinalysis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

The researchers found longtime cannabis users displayed higher global oxygen extraction fraction and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen than the non-users. The effects were dose-dependent, and so more cannabis use resulted in increased effects. Additionally, longtime users displayed greater blood flow in the putamen, which is an area of the brain associated with habit formation and reward learning. This effect may be the result of THC, which dilates blood vessels and created additional circulatory pathways. The researchers could not determine whether cannabis directly produced the changes or whether they merely reflected other underlying differences in brain tissue metabolic rate.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Cannabis Juicing

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

There are a wide range of vehicles available to medical marijuana patients, and each method offers its own unique benefits. One such method gaining in popularity among the medical marijuana community is cannabis juicing, which involves juicing the raw form of cannabis in order to extract its cannabinoids without experiencing any psychoactive effects. When consuming the raw form of cannabis, patients can access unique cannabinoids that disappear when the plant is heated, like THCA, CBDA, and CBG, which are known to help immune and cell function. Juicing cannabis only works with fresh leaves and flowers that have not been cured or age, and it can take days to weeks before its benefits can take effect.

It is believed cannabis juice may be able to treat depression, anxiety, dementia, stroke, insomnia, fatigue, cancer, pain, diabetes, and immune system disorders. It is also a powerful dietary supplement. Because cannabis juice is non-psychoactive, patients can ingest more of it without feeling unwanted side effects, and can therefore ingest higher amounts of cannabinoids and terpenes. Cannabis juice contains cannabinoids in their acidic forms, and while research is still lacking, what does exist suggests there may be a wide array of therapeutic benefits. THCA has shown promise in treating pain and inflammation, nausea and appetite loss, acting as an anti-proliferative against prostate cancer, and protecting against nerve degeneration. CBDA may also treat nausea and fight the growth of cancerous tumors. 

Cannabis juicing may not be for those diagnosed with kidney or gallbladder disorders, and it can interfere with certain medications. For more information about cannabis juice and for recipes or instructions, visit Leaf Science. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis Use Alone Does Not Contribute to the Risk of Stroke, Study Finds

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A team of researchers from Sweden and France have determined marijuana use alone does not increase stroke risk for adults under 60. The population-based study gave two detailed questionnaires, one regarding substance use and the other on social and behavioral factors, to 49,321 Swedish men who were born between 1949 and 1951 and then drafted into the military between ages 18 and 20. The researchers, lead by Daniel Falkstedt, PhD, then compared their findings with information from the national database about any stroke events that the participants experienced before age 60. 

The study, which was published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke, concluded, “[B]y examining cannabis use in young adulthood in relation to subsequent risk of stroke in a large population-based cohort, we found no evident association between cannabis use and stroke, including stroke before 45 years of age... Tobacco smoking, however, showed a clear, dose-response shaped association with stroke.”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.