Medical Marijuana For Children With Cancer Broadly Supported By Doctors

Photo Credit: 7raysmarketing (pixabay.com)

Photo Credit: 7raysmarketing (pixabay.com)

According to a survey of pediatric oncologists which was published in the journal Pediatrics, 85% of physicians who were certified to prescribe medical marijuana were willing to help children with cancer access the medication. Additionally, 95% those who were not eligible to provide the medication supported medical marijuana access for pediatric cancer patients. The survey was sent to 654 doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, psychologists, social workers and registered nurses who care primarily for children with cancer at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and Seattle Children’s Hospital Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. Of the 288 who responded, a third were certified to prescribe medical marijuana. Physicians were less likely to support smoking marijuana (57%) than they were to support oral formulations (89%) for administering the medication, and 93% were interested in more advanced clinical trials investigating these uses. Physicians were more likely to support the use of medical marijuana in patients as their conditions advanced.

Of the respondents, 3 in 10 providers who were asked for medical marijuana at least once in the previous month were asked to prescribe it for nausea and vomiting (79%), and half of those requests additionally wanted to manage loss of appetite (52%). A quarter of patients wanted medical marijuana for pain management (26%), or for the management of depression and anxiety. While only 8% of providers recommended medical marijuana to patients in practice, 92% still said they would be willing to help children with cancer get the medication and approve of its use for treating children’s symptoms. Nearly half of providers cited the biggest obstacle in providing medical marijuana to pediatric cancer patients as not having standard medical marijuana formulations, dosages, or strength. Authors explained, “Given burgeoning interest in medical marijuana, especially in oncology care, it is critical that providers who are routinely approached for access to medical marijuana possess baseline knowledge on regulations, known benefits and harm… Randomized clinical trials using such MM [medical marijuana] formulations for supportive care in children with cancer are needed to better understand the therapeutic potential.”

This information has been provided by Forbes and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana Can Help Children with Seizures, Cancer Nausea

Photo Credit: pixabay.com

Photo Credit: pixabay.com

A new study published in the journal Pediatrics suggests medical marijuana can treat seizures and reduce chemotherapy-related nausea in adolescents. The study analyzed 22 studies related to the use of marijuana as a therapy for children and young adults, and found THC improved nausea and vomiting in young patients undergoing chemotherapy, which CBD was beneficial for treating seizures. This information is especially welcomed for children who have not responded well to other treatment options. While cannabis was seen as beneficial for young patients suffering cancer or epilepsy, the review did not find promising information regarding its use in pediatrics for the treatment of neuropathic pain, PTSD, and Tourette’s syndrome.

On the other hand, the review found cannabis may present certain harms for young patients, and one of the study’s lead authors, Dr. Shane Shucheng Wong, explains, “Our research supports the AAP’s concerns that cannabis can be harmful to children’s brains… Studies of children and adolescents who use recreational cannabis, particularly frequent use of high potency cannabis over longer periods of time, suggest negative effects on learning, memory, attention, and problem-solving ability.” Because of this, there should be extra care in following proper dosing guidelines. That’s where our CannaBest Medical smartphone app can be extra useful! With it, you can keep track of the amount of cannabis used, the frequency of its use, the cannabinoid composition, and the preferred vehicle for administration, so that you can discover the most appropriate treatment regimen. Journal daily for the most accurate results.

This information has been provided in part by HealthLine and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. The views expressed in this post do not reflect an endorsement by HealthLine for our product.

Cannabis For Treating Multiple Sclerosis

Photo Credit: Gjbmiller / Pixabay

Photo Credit: Gjbmiller / Pixabay

New research coming from Colorado State University's Integrative Neurophysiology Laboratory suggests cannabis helps multiple sclerosis patients improve their activity levels, strength, speed, and reduce fatigue. The Rocky Mountain MS Center claims 550 people in Colorado suffer from MS, making it the highest proportion of MS patients in the US and a great area to study therapies for MS symptoms. In this new observational study, Colorado State University's research team involved MS patients who were already using medial marijuana as a therapy. The lab surveyed 139 MS patients and categorized the types of cannabis-based products they used, how often they used the products, and for how long they used the products. They then found 66% currently used a form of cannabis for treatment, and 56% either smoked the medication or consumed edibles. 78% of cannabis users claimed the medication allowed them to reduce or stop use of other medications. Preliminary results suggest cannabis increases physical activity levels, leg strength, walking speed, reduces spasticity and fatigue, and lowers the risk of falling. 

The lab hopes to continue its observational research on cannabis for MS symptoms, looking into its effects on physical function and activity levels. They also want to better understand what strains, dose, and vehicle provide the best therapeutic relief. This information has been provided by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.  

Everything You Need to Know About Cannabis Flavonoids

Photo Credit: PixaBay

Photo Credit: PixaBay

Cannabis is well known for its cannabinoids and terpenes, but did you know that marijuana is also a flavonoid-rich resource? There are over 6,000 uniquely identifiable flavonoids, making it one of the larger nutrient families known to scientists. While little is known about them in relation to cannabis because of cannabis' schedule II status, flavonoids are well-studied nutrients in other plants, specifically the ones that we eat. Flavonoids work with each other and with other phytonutrients in order to produce a range of effects, including health benefits.

One group of flavonoids called the "catechins" acts as an antioxidant and provides benefits for cardiovascular health and cholesterol in humans. Another flavonoid called "quercetin," which is also present in cannabis, provides antioxidant and antiviral benefits. Some of these common flavonoids present in cannabis can work in conjunction with, or resistance to, certain terpenes and cannabinoids. Flavonoids that that are unique to the cannabis plant are now called "cannaflavins." One recently discovered cannaflavin, Cannaflavin-A, inhibits the prostaglandin that produces inflammation and responds well to NSAIDS like aspirin. The new study found this cannaflavin reduces inflammation and is significantly more powerful than aspirin. 

This information has been provided by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.