What Are The Medical Benefits of CBD? - Part 2

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

In today’s post, we’ll continue our discussion of which conditions could benefit from CBD treatment.

We’ll begin with Alzheimer’s disease, which scientists believe CBD could treat or even prevent its onset. A 2013 study found CBD prevented the development of amyloid beta plaques, while another study found CBD promoted the growth of new brain cells that were lost to damage caused by the condition, and that it improved symptoms associated with cognitive deficits. The topical application of CBD may treat acne, and studies have found it can reduce inflammation and the production of sebum oil, as well as halt the development of acne. CBD can also help with psoriasis, and studies have found the cannabinoid can prevent the spread of cells that cause the condition’s patches. CBD may also help cancer patients, not only by reducing the nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, but also by preventing the spread of cancer cells and causing cancer cell death. Studies have also found CBD slows the formation of blood vessels within tumors, thereby blocking nutrients from entering the tumor and slowing its growth.

CBD has also been earning a name lately for treating pain and reducing the need for the harmful opiate medications that are traditionally used. Studies have found CBD reduces inflammation and the sensory perception and emotional effects of pain. Research suggests CBD is more effective at treating long-term neuropathic pain than short-term pain. CBD may protect against heart disease, and studies have found the cannabinoid protects cardiac cells when blood supply to the heart is blocked, stops heart arrhythmia, and reduces cardiac damage when oxygen is block. CBD also reduces heart disease from diabetes by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress, scarring, and cell death. The topical application of CBD can target localized areas of pain caused by arthritis. Studies have found CBD blocks pain and prevents nerve damage from osteoarthritis, as well as uses anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects to blog the condition’s progression. Some studies have found CBD may be able to stabilize mood, something that could be helpful for those suffering from Bipolar Disorder. That said, CBD was only effective during depressive stages, and not during manic phases.

That’s not all! Stay tuned for tomorrow’s post to learn more about which conditions CBD could help. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

CBD for Pain - Part 2

Photo Credit: typographyimages (pixabay.com)

Photo Credit: typographyimages (pixabay.com)

In the previous post, we discussed how Cannabidiol (CBD) could provide safe and effective pain relief Now, Let’s look at some of the conditions for which CBD can reduce pain.

One study from 2007 involving 125 patients found Sativex, an extract containing THC and CBD, significantly reduced pain in patients with allodynia, a rare condition in which non-painful stimulation or touch becomes painful. Sativex was also found to be effective in a 2013 study against cancer-related pain. Another 2014 study found CBD reduced chemotherapy pain without side effects in mice. One study from 2016 found topical CBD was not only effective but that it was also safe in reducing pain and inflammation associated with arthritis, and it produced very few side effects. Many scientific reviews claim CBD can relieve treatment-resistant chronic pain, and one study from 2007 found CBD relieved chronic pain in rats. Many prefer CBD to pharmaceutical medications because it produces much fewer side effects and it has proven well-tolerated. Lastly, CBD may treat the acute and chronic pain associated with multiple sclerosis. One animal study from 2013 found CBD’s anti-inflammatory properties make it a promising pain reliever for those with MS, and another study found administering Sativex to MS patients effectively relieved the neuropathic pain associated with the condition.

This concludes our miniseries on CBD for pain. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

CBD for Pain - Part 1

Photo Credit: typographyimages (pixabay.com)

Photo Credit: typographyimages (pixabay.com)

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid in cannabis that can can provide safe and effective pain relief without producing many side effects. In this two part series, we’ll discuss how CBD can successfully treat pain, and then continue our discussion with a look at specific conditions in which CBD may help.

Some studies suggest CBD is better at treating chronic and neuropathic pain than it is at treating short-term pain. It’s ability to reduce inflammation also allows it to reduce the pain associated with it. Unlike non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which work to block enzymes that produce inflammation, swelling, and pain, CBD acts within the endocannabinoid system. In doing so, it avoids some of the dangerous side effects associated with blocking those enzymes, like risk of ulcers, stomach bleeding, heart attack, and stroke. Some scientists believe CBD may be able to provide pain relief through its interactions with vanilloid receptors. One study from 2012 also found CBD also treated chronic pain by activating glycine receptors in the spinal cord. Although THC is generally considered to be a more successful pain reliever through its direct interactions on CB1 receptors, it is also known for its psychoactive properties, so many may want to avoid the cannabinoid in order to avoid “high” sensations. That said, CBD can also buffer against these side effects, so strains which include both THC and CBD may benefit from THC’s pain relief and CBD’s tempering effects.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. Stay tuned from tomorrow’s post, where we will dive into a discussion about which pain-causing conditions CBD may be able to relieve.

Can Marijuana Help With Back Pain?

Photo Credit: WolfBlur/Pixabay

Photo Credit: WolfBlur/Pixabay

Marijuana’s analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties make it a potential candidate for reducing back pain. Currently, massages or chiropractic therapy, over-the-counter medications, and prescription medications like opioids are used to treat back pain. There are many clinical trials that suggest cannabis could be a powerful treatment option for pain reduction. One study found patients who inhaled vaporized cannabis three times a day over the course of five days significantly reduced their chronic pain. Another review of six clinical trials found “high quality” evidence that cannabis could provide powerful pain relief. One study found 34 patients with treatment-resistant chronic pain cannabis extracts significantly improved pain management. Indeed, most patients in the U.S. and Canada cite chronic pain as their main reason for using medical marijuana. Researchers believe cannabis is able to combat pain by interacting with the endocannabinoid system and blocking pain signals from being sent to the brain.

At a time when opioids are seemingly overprescribed and the opioid epidemic is rampant, medical marijuana is a welcomed player in pain management. One survey found 97% of participants successfully decreased their use of opioids thanks to marijuana. and 81% found cannabis was more effective on its own at treating their condition. Another survey found 63% of 166 respondents enrolled in Canada’s national medical cannabis system substituted prescriptions with cannabis, and 32% attributed their substitution to fewer side effects and better symptom management.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Cannabis Reduced Pain, Improved Quality Of Life For Cancer Patients In New Study

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

According to an Israeli study from Ben Gurion University and Soroka Medical Centre which involved hundreds of palliative care cancer patients, cannabis reduced pain and increased quality of life. Researchers looked at data from March 2015 to February 2017 which involved 1,152 cancer patients who used cannabis as a medicine. The patients first met with nurses, and then had follow-up phone interviews a month after and six months after. Before the treatment, 50.2% of patients experienced pain rated between 8-10, with 0 as painless and 10 as unimaginably painful. Six months later, only 5% still reported pain within the 8-10 range. Additionally, prior to cannabis treatment, only 19% of patients rated their quality of life as “good.” After six months of cannabis treatment, however, this percentage jumped to 70%. Although 1,152 patients participated in phone interviews, there were actually 3,357 patients who started the palliative cannabis care during the study. However, 903 patients died, 483 patients stopped cannabis treatment, and 339 reported feeling dizziness, dry mouth, and tiredness.

This reminds us that cannabis may not be the best treatment option for everyone. To determine whether or not cannabis treatment might work for you, our app can help! With this journaling tool, you can keep track of the dosing amount, cannabinoid ratio, and frequency of usage to document which combinations provide desirable relief and which combinations produce unwanted side effects. In this way, you can figure out the dosing routine with consistently makes you feel the way you want to feel. We recommend journaling daily for the most accurate results.

This information has been provided in part by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This post does not represent an endorsement by Civilized for any CannaBest Medical products.

Two Thirds Of Pain Patients In A New Study Used Cannabis To Get Off Opioids

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

According to a new survey of 400 patients and 500 pharmacists conducted by Aclara Research, two thirds of pain patients successfully weened off of opioids with the help of cannabis. Of those polled, 67% ceased use of opioids once enrolled in state regulated medical cannabis programs, and 29% able to reduce their use of opioids with cannabis, leaving only 4% with opioid use unaffected by cannabis access. Additionally, 30% of patients stopped using all prescription medications with the use of medical cannabis. Of the pharmacists polled, 87% supported legalized medical marijuana access, and 69% pharmacists should dispense the medication and provide guidance for its use. With the current situation, only 15% of patients discussed cannabis with their pharmacists, with 40% of users learning about the medication online. This survey supports findings from previous studies, and further illustrates how medical cannabis could be a powerful player in the fight against the opioid epidemic that is gripping the nation.

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of Marijuana? - Part 1.

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Medical marijuana is now being touted for having a wide range of medicinal benefits that allow it to provide therapeutic relief for many different conditions. In this four part series, we will take an in depth look at many of the medical conditions it is capable of treating.

One of the most commonly cited and widely approved conditions for marijuana use is chronic pain. Marijuana is known for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, making it effective in reducing pain and providing relief for the conditions that cause it, like arthritis, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and migraines. Medical marijuana is also used for treating glaucoma, a condition that affects sight and can damage the optic nerve due to increased pressure in the eye. Studies have found marijuana decreases intraocular eye pressure by 25-30%, and scientists believe its neuroprotective properties could prevent the optic nerve from getting damaged. Medical marijuana may also help those suffering from liver disease. The cannabinoid CBD can prevent liver fibrosis, while THC may be able to help improve the symptoms associated with cholestatic liver disease.

Marijuana is also promoted as a hero for cancer patients, mainly for its ability to reduce the nausea and vomiting accompanying chemotherapy treatments. Even more exciting, in rodent models, THC and cannabinoids have been found to induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting healthy cells. In other rodent models, THC reduced tumor size. Contrary to what has long been claimed by prohibitionists about cannabis’ relationship to schizophrenia, studies have found non-psychoactive compounds like CBD may actually benefit psychosis. CBD is antipsychotic and generally well tolerated. But be careful, as THC may actually exacerbate symptoms. Lastly, recent clinical trials have found medical marijuana help those with multiple sclerosis by combatting muscle spasticity, reducing pain, and improving sleep quality.

That concludes today’s post on the medical benefits of medical marijuana, but there’s still so much more to discuss! Tune into the following post where we will look at more conditions where medical marijuana’s usage is applicable. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Using Cannabis Pain Patches for Fibromyalgia

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

Medical marijuana patients have access to a myriad of different methods and vehicles for administering medical marijuana therapy. Now, the company Cannabis Science has developed two new transdermal patches that can offer relief for fibromyalgia and diabetic neuropathy nerve pain. Transdermal patches allow cannabinoids to enter the bloodstream directly through entering the skin. Some patients prefer this method because it allows for more precise dosing, so the patient can receive specific dosages and can target the affected areas of the body. The cannabinoid most responsible for providing relief through these patches is CBD, because studies have found it effectively provides pain relief for inflammatory pain, including that associated with fibromyalgia and peripheral neuropathy, without producing any psychoactive side effects.

This information has been provided by High Times Magazine and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Cancer Patients in Seattle Effectively Treat Symptoms with Cannabis

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

Information coming from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre in Seattle has found of 926 patients at the Seattle Cancer Centre Alliance in Washington State, nearly a quarter self medicate with cannabis to treat symptoms like physical pain, nausea, stress, insomnia, and depression. In the study, which was published in the journal Cancer, 24% of patients used cannabis within the year, and 21% within the month. Around 66% had used it at some time in their lives. Three-quarters of those surveyed also expressed interest in learning about cannabis from reliable sources like healthcare professionals.

Investigators also found most patients were not receiving their information from healthcare professionals, leading researcher Dr. Steven Pergam to state, “Cancer patients desire but are not receiving information from their cancer doctors about marijuana use during their treatment, so many of them are seeking information from alternate non-scientific sources… We hope that this study helps to open up the door for more studies aimed at evaluating the risks and benefits of marijuana in this population ... This is important, because if we do not educate our patients about marijuana, they will continue to get their information elsewhere.”

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Survey Finds Coloradans Use Marijuana For Sleep and Pain Relief, Not Partying

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

With the wave of legalization gaining popularity in various states across the nation, it is interesting to see the motivations behind marijuana use. In Colorado, where both recreational and medical marijuana are legal, it seems even the recreational users are using marijuana to self medicate, as opposed to using it for fun. The organization Consumer Research Around Cannabis surveyed over 1,200 marijuana users in Denver and it surroundings, and found 47.2% used cannabis as a sleep aid. Another 47.2% used it for pain relief. Falling closely behind, 45.7% used marijuana for anxiety and depression. Only 28.5% used marijuana for recreational fun, and 32.8% responded they used marijuana for expanding creativity and thought processes.

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Can Marijuana Help With Fibromyalgia?

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Fibromyalgia is a condition that produces pain throughout the body and specific tender spots where the pain is characterized as deep tissue tenderness. Fibromyalgia patients also suffer symptoms similar to that of the flu, feeling fatigued and exhausted, or experiencing stiffness. Current treatments for fibromyalgia usually include exercise, cognitive behavioral treatment, mind-body awareness, and lifestyle changes, but now, some patients are looking to medical marijuana for symptom relief due to the fact it has been found to relieve pain, sleep disturbance, stiffness, mood disorders, and digestive disturbances. There are few controlled clinical studies revolving around marijuana use for fibromyalgia, but surveys have found fibromyalgia patients find medical marijuana effective for their symptoms. In a survey from Canada, one out of every eight people with fibromyalgia use marijuana or its cannabinoids for symptom relief. More men opted for marijuana than women, and marijuana users tended to be younger. Of the study’s participants, 77% of cannabis users were unemployed, leading researchers to theorize the marijuana was either ineffective at improving function, or patients who opted for marijuana were more severely affected by their symptoms from the beginning.

Another online survey of 1,300 fibromyalgia patients found 62% of patients who had tried marijuana had found it effective for treating their symptoms. The survey, which was conducted by the National Pain Foundation, also found that many sufferers claimed marijuana was the only option that helped provide symptom relief. In another survey, in which fibromyalgia sufferers were divided into groups of marijuana users and non-users, marijuana users smoked or ate marijuana not only to help with pain, but also to alleviate all of their other symptoms. Patients reported decreases in pain and stiffness and improved relaxation, sleep, and well-being, within two hours of dosing. Side effects were mild, but included dry mouth, dizziness, or sedation. Over 80% felt relief from sleeplessness. Lastly, a 2008 randomized trial published in the Journal of Pain found the administration of nabilone, which is a synthetic form of THC, improved pain and other symptoms in 40 fibromyalgia patients. A following study in 2010 found nabilone produced similar improvements.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Is THCA and What Are the Benefits of This Cannabinoid?

Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid, or THCA, is an acidic cannabinoid that precedes THC. Unlike THC, THCA is a non-psychoactive compound found in raw cannabis. Through the use of heat to initiate decarboxylation, THCA converts into THC, which does produce psychoactive properties. Although THCA is not as well studied as THC, research is beginning to suggest that THCA may provide significant therapeutic benefits. Preliminary research suggests THCA may provide anti-inflammatory effects, which could benefit a wide range of conditions including arthritis and lupus. It may also contain neuroprotective properties, which could help those suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. THCA may supply anti-emetic properties for nausea or appetite loss, and it may also be anti-proliferative, which is relevant for prostate cancer. Patient testimonies also suggest THCA may provide relief for insomnia, muscle spasms, and pain. This information may provide hope for seeking relief, but there is still much to be desired when it comes to research surrounding THCA and its potential benefits.

This information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Cannabis is More Effective at Treating Migraine Pain than Prescription Drugs

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

A new study presented at the 3rd Congress of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) and conducted by Dr. Maria Nicolodi from the Interuniversity Center in Florence has determined cannabis is more effective than traditional medications when it comes to treating the pain associated with migraines and cluster headaches. Researchers determined participants needed at least 100mg of a combination of THC and CBD before patients would experience any relief. For significant relief, patients received a dose of 200 mg. The amounts of THC and CBD varied. After determining the appropriate dose, researchers administered cannabis to one group, while the other group received antidepressants or blood pressure medications that are common for migraine and cluster headache therapies. Headache patients did not experience significant relief. Migraine sufferers, on the other hand, experienced a 43.5% reduction in pain. Side effects were considered minor and less severe than those experienced from prescription medications. 

Dr. Nicolodi says of the study, “We were able to demonstrate that cannabinoids are an alternative to established treatments in migraine prevention. That said, they are only suited for use in the acute treatment of cluster headaches in patients with a history of migraine from childhood on.”

This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study: Patients Report Substituting Cannabis For Opioids, Other Pain Medications

Photo Credit: NORML

Photo Credit: NORML

According to data published in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, patients are successfully substituting cannabis for opioids and other analgesics for the treatment of pain. Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, and Kent State University looked at data from 2,897 self-identified medical cannabis patients, of which 97% of those who acknowledged using opioid medications within the past 6 months were able to decrease their intake with thanks to the use of cannabis. Ninety-two percent of respondents also claimed cannabis had fewer side effects than opioids, and eighty-two percent said medical cannabis provided better relief and symptom management. Of the participants who had taken nonopioid-based pain medications, 96% were able to reduce their usage after beginning cannabis use, and 92% claimed medical cannabis was the more effective option. Authors explained, “[M]ore people are looking at cannabis as a viable treatment for everyday ailments such as muscle soreness and inflammation. … [T]his study can conclude that medical cannabis patients report successfully using cannabis along with or as a substitute for opioid-based pain medication.”

This information has been provided by NORML and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

What is Cannabichromene (CBC)?

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

Although research surrounding cannabichromene (CBC) is still new, it is thought to be the second most abundant cannabinoid found in cannabis. The cannabinoid is non-psychoactive and offers an array of therapeutic benefits on its own, but it is also an important part of whole plant cannabis therapy.

CBC has antibacterial and anti-fungal properties, and one study dating back to 1981 at the University of Mississippi found CBC had strong antibacterial activity and mild to moderate anti-fungal activity when administered to a variety of bacteria and fungi strains. Additionally, CBC offers relief from pain and inflammation. It is especially effective for treating inflammation in the intestinal tract, and in 2012, researchers from the University of Naples found CBC reduced diarrhea without causing constipation. CBC also can fight acne, and a European team of researchers in 2016 found CBC reduced arachidonic acid and the production of sebum in sebaceous glands. Lastly, CBC may support the growth and viability of neurogenesis, and a 2013 study at the Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry of the National Research Council found CBC had a positive effect on the viability of mouse neural stem progenitor cells (NSPCs).

This information is provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Terpene Profile: Humulene

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

As research surrounding cannabis expands, people are becoming much more familiar with the cannabinoids that are responsible for therapeutic relief, but people are not as familiar with the other medicinal compounds of cannabis: terpenes. One such terpene is Humulene, one of the ore prominent terpenes of cannabis with a distinct hoppy aroma. Humulene has been used to suppress appetite, treat inflammation, manage pain, and fight bacterial infections. Another study from the University of Quebec in 2006 humulene was active against staphylococcus aureus bacteria strain. Another study from the Federal University of Santa Catarina in Brazil in 2007 found humulene effectively reduced inflammation. A 2008 study suggested humulene acted as an antinociceptive, so that it effectively blocked feelings of pain. Now, humulene is being analyzed for its potential in treating cancerous tumors. Recently in 2003, the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research found humulene was the only compound in balsam fir oil that was active against solid tumor cell lines, and determined the terpene aided in producing Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), which supports apoptosis in cancer. 

This information has been brought to you be Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis Juicing

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

There are a wide range of vehicles available to medical marijuana patients, and each method offers its own unique benefits. One such method gaining in popularity among the medical marijuana community is cannabis juicing, which involves juicing the raw form of cannabis in order to extract its cannabinoids without experiencing any psychoactive effects. When consuming the raw form of cannabis, patients can access unique cannabinoids that disappear when the plant is heated, like THCA, CBDA, and CBG, which are known to help immune and cell function. Juicing cannabis only works with fresh leaves and flowers that have not been cured or age, and it can take days to weeks before its benefits can take effect.

It is believed cannabis juice may be able to treat depression, anxiety, dementia, stroke, insomnia, fatigue, cancer, pain, diabetes, and immune system disorders. It is also a powerful dietary supplement. Because cannabis juice is non-psychoactive, patients can ingest more of it without feeling unwanted side effects, and can therefore ingest higher amounts of cannabinoids and terpenes. Cannabis juice contains cannabinoids in their acidic forms, and while research is still lacking, what does exist suggests there may be a wide array of therapeutic benefits. THCA has shown promise in treating pain and inflammation, nausea and appetite loss, acting as an anti-proliferative against prostate cancer, and protecting against nerve degeneration. CBDA may also treat nausea and fight the growth of cancerous tumors. 

Cannabis juicing may not be for those diagnosed with kidney or gallbladder disorders, and it can interfere with certain medications. For more information about cannabis juice and for recipes or instructions, visit Leaf Science. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis Pain Patches For Fibromyalgia And Nerve Pain

Photo Credit: HERB

Photo Credit: HERB

Cannabis patches are now being used to treat fibromyalgia and reduce diabetic nerve pain. Fibromyalgia and diabetes often produce painful tingling sensations, and in a 2014 survey from the National Pain Foundation, cannabis was reported as the most effective analgesic for fibromyalgia patients who were willing to try medical cannabis. The patients who tried medical marijuana reported it as being more effective than traditional medications like Savella, Cymbalta, and Lyrica. A human trial involving 16 diabetic patients with foot neuropathy found medical marijuana provided dose-dependent relief for pain. Similar results have been noticed with in those who suffer from multiple sclerosis.

Patients already have access to cannabis pharmaceuticals, topical creams, and oral options, but now companies like Cannabis Science, Inc. are developing pain patches to deliver transdermal therapy that enters the bloodstream through the skin. They are currently creating different patches targeting both diabetic neuropathy and fibromyalgia. Mary's Medicinals also offer patches containing variations in cannabinoids. 

This information has been provided by Herb and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study: Canadian Patients Substituting Marijuana for Prescription Drugs

Photo Credit: Marijuana Industry News

Photo Credit: Marijuana Industry News

A recent study from the University of British Columbia and the University of Victoria which was published in the International Journal of Drug Policy revealed patients in Canada suffering mental health conditions and pain substitute marijuana for opioids, benzodiazepines, and antidepressants. Researchers surveyed 271 patients registered with the cannabis producer Tilray and found 63% of respondents substituted marijuana for their prescription medication to treat pain-related conditions, including chronic pain and arthritis, mental health conditions, eating disorders, PTSD, and psychiatric disorder. The survey consisted of 107 questions that took into account demographics, use patterns, and marijuana as a substitution for medications. Authors noted that in the midst of the opioid epidemic, "cannabis could play a significant role in reducing the health burden of problematic prescription drug use.”

This information has been provided by Marijuana Industry News and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.  

3 Pain Conditions Medicinal Marijuana Can Treat

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

For those who suffer from debilitating pain and want a safe option for relief, they may want to look to medical marijuana for pain relief without the addictive or harmful side effects of opioids. Medical marijuana can treat a wide range of pain conditions, including the pain caused by HIV/AIDS and cancer treatments, chronic pain, and pain caused by damaged nervous systems. Cannabidiol and delta-9-THC are already used in an oral spray called Sativex that is used to relieve severe cancer pain. Along with cancer patients, cannabis can also help HIV/AIDS patients by relieving pain, nausea, and increase appetite, and improving overall quality of life. In these cases, cannabis should not replace traditional treatment methods, but rather supplement them.

Patients who suffer from chronic pain can also benefit from cannabis use, and studies have found test subjects who take daily doses of medical marijuana report no ill-effects on their kidneys, livers, or hormonal function. They also report that cannabis is a successful treatment even when conventional therapies fail. Patients who suffer from arthritis, fibromyalgia, and other debilitating disorders could benefit from medical cannabis. Lastly, cannabis helps those who suffer from pain in their central nervous system by treating the pain itself, but also by targeting other symptoms like sleep and anxiety.

This information has been provided by the Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.