What Are The Medical Benefits of CBD? - Part 3

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

Let’s continue our discussion of which conditions could benefit from CBD treatment by beginning with strokes. One animal study found CBD reduced two types of brain damage caused by a stroke, so much so that the outcomes of the group which had the stroke were comparable to the control group that did not. Its neuroprotective properties may help prevent brain damage and help patients heal. When administered before trauma, CBD can also protect against the damage caused by spinal cord injury, and aid in the healing process. Because of its neuroprotective effects, CBD may also be beneficial for those with traumatic brain injury, and studies suggest the cannabinoid protects neurons following injury, reduces the formation of scar tissue, and regenerates neuronal axons. CBD may also treat nicotine addiction, and in one study involving 24 smokers, some smokers received a placebo inhaler while some received a placebo inhaler. Smokers were instructed to use the inhaler when cigarette cravings struck. Those who received the placebo did no reduce their cigarette usage, while those who received CBD reduced their use by 40%.

The medication Sativex, which contains equal parts CBD and THC, has been found to effectively lower scores of spasticity related symptoms in patients with moderate to severe Multiple Sclerosis, even when these patients were previously treatment-resistant. CBD also reduced the production of cytokines, and activated an important biological pathway blocked by multiple sclerosis. Sativex may also help those with ADHD. CBD was also found to improve social interaction and reduce hyperactivity in rats with ADHD. CBD may also promote wakefulness in those who suffer from sleep disorders that cause excessive sleep. CBD also improved the quality of sleep in young patients who suffered from PTSD. CBD may also help patients heal from liver disease. One study found CBD reduces the neurological damage and cognitive impairments caused by toxins that remain in the blood as a result of liver failure. CBD also restored liver and brain function. Lastly, when taken before and after surgery, CBD increased the success rates of bone marrow transplants, and patients who received CBD were less likely to develop graft versus host disease.

This concludes our series examining the many uses for CBD. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of Marijuana? - Part 1.

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Medical marijuana is now being touted for having a wide range of medicinal benefits that allow it to provide therapeutic relief for many different conditions. In this four part series, we will take an in depth look at many of the medical conditions it is capable of treating.

One of the most commonly cited and widely approved conditions for marijuana use is chronic pain. Marijuana is known for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, making it effective in reducing pain and providing relief for the conditions that cause it, like arthritis, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and migraines. Medical marijuana is also used for treating glaucoma, a condition that affects sight and can damage the optic nerve due to increased pressure in the eye. Studies have found marijuana decreases intraocular eye pressure by 25-30%, and scientists believe its neuroprotective properties could prevent the optic nerve from getting damaged. Medical marijuana may also help those suffering from liver disease. The cannabinoid CBD can prevent liver fibrosis, while THC may be able to help improve the symptoms associated with cholestatic liver disease.

Marijuana is also promoted as a hero for cancer patients, mainly for its ability to reduce the nausea and vomiting accompanying chemotherapy treatments. Even more exciting, in rodent models, THC and cannabinoids have been found to induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting healthy cells. In other rodent models, THC reduced tumor size. Contrary to what has long been claimed by prohibitionists about cannabis’ relationship to schizophrenia, studies have found non-psychoactive compounds like CBD may actually benefit psychosis. CBD is antipsychotic and generally well tolerated. But be careful, as THC may actually exacerbate symptoms. Lastly, recent clinical trials have found medical marijuana help those with multiple sclerosis by combatting muscle spasticity, reducing pain, and improving sleep quality.

That concludes today’s post on the medical benefits of medical marijuana, but there’s still so much more to discuss! Tune into the following post where we will look at more conditions where medical marijuana’s usage is applicable. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s Patients Find Relief in Medical Marijuana

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

According to a report published in the journal Complementary Therapies in Medicine, patients who suffer from Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis may find relief in medical marijuana. The Michael J. Fox Foundation and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society hosted an online questionnaire in which 595 subjects responded, of which respondents claimed cannabis was effective at symptom management (6.4 on a scale from 0-7), and 59% said they were able to reduce their use of prescription medications. Respondents who identified as medical marijuana users reported lower levels of disability in memory, mood, and fatigue, when compared to non-users. This report supports the findings of previous placebo-controlled clinical trials in which cannabis effectively managed the symptoms of MS patients.

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Evidence Shows CBD Beneficial for Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and Multiple Sclerosis

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

According to new research conducted by a team of Italian researchers and published in CNS & Neurological Disorders - Drug Targets, CBD can provide neuroprotection for patients diagnosed with neurological disorders. In the study, researchers looked through laboratory and clinical findings referencing CBD’s effects on neurological conditions, and while more research is left to be desired, they determined, “Pre-clinical evidence largely shows that CBD can produce beneficial effects in [Alzheimer’s disease], [Parkinson’s disease], and [multiple sclerosis] patients, but its employment for these disorders needs further confirmation from well designed clinical studies.” The review only searched through studies involving CBD alone.

This information supports previous studies that suggest CBD has neuroprotective properties that can inhibit the progression of neurological disorders. Additionally, researchers found pre-clinical evidence suggesting CBD has antiepileptic properties and can be effective and beneficial for those diagnosed with treatment-resistant seizure disorders.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also access the review here.

Cannabis Has Positive Impacts on People With Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis, Study Shows

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study conducted by researcher at Colorado State University suggests cannabis may be able to help manage some of the symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease, including symptoms pertaining to mood, memory, fatigue, and obesity. The study, which was published in Complementary Therapies in Medicine, involved 595 participants, of which 76% were Parkinson’s disease patients and 24% were multiple sclerosis patients. Over 40% of users were currently treating their symptoms with cannabis, and reported cannabis symptom management efficacy around 6.4 on a scale from 0 to 7. Users reported lower levels of neurological dysfunction and lower levels of disability, specifically in relation to mood, memory, and fatigue. Additionally, 59% said they could reduce their use of prescription medications. Participants were overall younger and less likely to be obese. On the downside, patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis may experience negative impacts on balance.

The researchers used anonymous web-based surveys collecting demographic and cannabis consumption behavioral data, along with information regarding participants’ neurological function, fatigue, balance, and physical activation participation. to compare self-reported assessments of neurological disability among current cannabis users and non-users. They concluded, “Cannabis may have positive impacts on mood, memory, fatigue, and obesity status in people with [Parkinson’s disease] and [multiple sclerosis.” This study supports previously findings that suggest cannabis and cannabinoids help improve symptoms and inhibit progression of both neurological disorders. Still, researchers would like to see more in depth research surrounding the use of cannabis for multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also learn more about the study here.

Conditions Medical Marijuana Could Help

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Medical cannabis is full of chemical compounds called cannabinoids and terpenes that interact with the body's endocannabinoid system. The different concentrations of compounds allow the plant to have a wide array of different effects, which make cannabis suitable for many different conditions and symptoms, or even combat the side effects of other treatment regimens. For cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, cannabis can alleviate side effects associated with the treatment like fatigue, nausea, pain, loss of appetite, and insomnia. Similarly, HIV/AIDS treatment regimens produce similar side effects that can be alleviated by medical cannabis. 

Patients who suffer from multiple sclerosis experience neurological problems and muscle spasms. Medical Cannabis can help alleviate these symptoms, which can allow patients to gain control over their muscles, regain bladder control, improve vision and mobility, and thereby improve their overall quality of life. Cannabis can help those with epilepsy by reducing the frequency of seizures and even, at times, eliminating them all together. Studies have found CBD is an effective treatment option even in those who suffer from forms that had previously proven treatment-resistant. Chronic pain accompanies a wide range of conditions, but research has found cannabis can be as effective as pharmaceutical options. This offers patients a safer alternative to dangerous pharmaceuticals like opioids. Lastly, some patients with depression or anxiety could benefit from the relaxing properties high-CBD strains of cannabis. 

This information has been brought to you by the Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

 

Cannabis For Treating Multiple Sclerosis

Photo Credit: Gjbmiller / Pixabay

Photo Credit: Gjbmiller / Pixabay

New research coming from Colorado State University's Integrative Neurophysiology Laboratory suggests cannabis helps multiple sclerosis patients improve their activity levels, strength, speed, and reduce fatigue. The Rocky Mountain MS Center claims 550 people in Colorado suffer from MS, making it the highest proportion of MS patients in the US and a great area to study therapies for MS symptoms. In this new observational study, Colorado State University's research team involved MS patients who were already using medial marijuana as a therapy. The lab surveyed 139 MS patients and categorized the types of cannabis-based products they used, how often they used the products, and for how long they used the products. They then found 66% currently used a form of cannabis for treatment, and 56% either smoked the medication or consumed edibles. 78% of cannabis users claimed the medication allowed them to reduce or stop use of other medications. Preliminary results suggest cannabis increases physical activity levels, leg strength, walking speed, reduces spasticity and fatigue, and lowers the risk of falling. 

The lab hopes to continue its observational research on cannabis for MS symptoms, looking into its effects on physical function and activity levels. They also want to better understand what strains, dose, and vehicle provide the best therapeutic relief. This information has been provided by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.  

Benefits of Medical Cannabis for Multiple Sclerosis

Photo Credit: Lode Van de Velde/Public Domain http://bit.ly/2cNrj0L

Photo Credit: Lode Van de Velde/Public Domain http://bit.ly/2cNrj0L

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a painful diseases of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain and communication from the brain to the rest of the body. The National Multiple Sclerosis Society describes the disease as immune-mediated, meaning the immune system produces an abnormal response against the central nervous system as the result of an unknown antigen. Patients with MS need better treatment options available to them, and some are beginning to consider medical marijuana. The National Multiple Sclerosis Society supports further research of medical marijuana for MS, and supports the rights of MS patients to work with care providers in legalized states so they can access medical marijuana.

There are still uncertainties as to how medical marijuana can help with MS, but here's what is known. Cannabis has analgesic properties, and one 2012 study from the University of California at San Diego involving 30 MS patients found the group that was given marijuana witnessed a reduction in pain and spasticity by half in comparison with the scores of the group given placebo. Cannabis can also be used in conjunction with conventional MS medications to reduce the side effects they produce, like stress, depression, fever, dizziness, headaches, and fatigue. Cannabis also facilitates walking for MS patients, and one 1997 study published in the European Journal of Neurology found 70% of the 112 MS patients involved claimed improvements in leg weakness, leg pain, and spasticity when walking. Similarly, studies from the Global Neuroscience Initiative Foundation suggest cannabis improves mobility in MS patients. Lastly, cannabis increases survival, and in an animal study on rodents with MS published in the Journal of Neuroimmunology, 98% of the placebo group died, while 95% of the THC group survived during the disease's progression.

This information has been brought to you by the Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Can Medical Marijuana Treat Multiple Sclerosis?

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

For those who suffer from multiple sclerosis and do not experience significant relief from pharmaceutical medications, it may be time to give medical marijuana a try. There is plenty of anecdotal evidence to suggest medical marijuana can provide therapeutic relief for symptoms of MS, and while research is limited, early studies seem to back these claims. Medical cannabis can be helpful in providing relief for various symptoms associated with MS. The plant may calm muscle spasms which allows for better mobility. It can also help with an overactive bladder by easing muscle spasms that cause the frequent urge to pee. By combatting nerve pain, mmj can ease pain in general and even help patients get a good night's sleep.

The medication may take weeks to take noticeable effect, but for those who have tried all other options without success, it may provide worthwhile relief. Doctors recommend using medical marijuana as a pill or spray because it is easy to monitor how much active chemical a patient receives. There are relatively few adverse side effects that coincide with marijuana use, but some short-term effects include: increased heart rate, slowed reaction time, difficulties with coordination or balance, dizziness, dry mouth, or sleepiness. Long-term effects may include anxiety, mood swings, and trouble with complex thinking.

With about half of the states in the U.S. having legalized some form of medical marijuana, the plant is becoming more widely accepted as a treatment option for combatting various illnesses and symptoms, including MS. This information has been provided by WebMD and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study Suggests CBD Topicals Benefit Multiple Sclerosis

Photo Credit: Whaxy

Photo Credit: Whaxy

The use of medical marijuana topicals, such as ointments or balms, is not limited to only skin deep therapy. While many may use the medication to treat skin conditions like psoriasis or eczema, there is new research to suggest CBD-rich topical treatments can also help treat target the symptoms of multiple sclerosis, allowing patients who use the therapy to regain motor skills.

One Italian study conducted in October of 2015 involved mice who had been stricken with autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is a disease very similar to MS. In the study, researches looked at whether topical creams containing one percent CBD administered at the time of "symptomatic diseases onset" would affect the progression of the disease. They also looked to see if CBD creams could recover paralysis of the legs. The study revealed that the use of this CBD cream improved motor skills by reversing back leg paralysis, reducing spinal cord damage, and decreasing inflammation. While these results are positive, it is important to remember that researches suggest CBD topicals are only part of the therapeutic solution for treating MS.

This information has been brought to you by Whaxy and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study: Topical CBD Treatment May Reduce Central Nervous System Inflammation

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

A recent controlled study published in Daru: Journal of Faculty and Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences this year found topical treatments containing 1% purified CBD topical cream can reduce damage from brain inflammation. While the study was conducted on animals, it remains relevant to humans who suffer autoimmune diseases leading to demyelination, which occurs when the fatty covering around neurons are damaged. Such diseases include multiple sclerosis. 

The study used both healthy mice and mice given experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as models for humans who suffer from MS. The mice then received either 1% purified CBD cream, inactive cream, or no cream and were observed daily for 28 days. The mice that received the CBD cream experienced reduced damage caused by EAE; they experienced a reversal in back leg paralysis (or their loss of muscle function), there were reduced indications of spinal cord damage like demyelination or white blood cell count, they released less lymphocytes in their spleen cells, and their inflammatory signals reduced.

This study further supports the use of CBD in the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, while revealing the efficacy of topical treatment as a vehicle for administration. This information is brought to you by Medical Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. Find the study abstract here.