Marijuana Use Reduces In-Hospital Mortality in Heart Failure Patients, Study Finds

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

A new study published in the journal Circulation has found heart failure patients with a history of cannabis use are at lower risk of dying while hospitalized than their similarly matched controls. Looking at over six million hear failure patients over a seven-year period, investigators found patients who had a history of cannabis use were less likely to have atrial fibrillation, spent less time in the hospital, and were less likely to pass while hospitalized than non-users. Authors explain, “Our study showed that cannabis use lowered the odds of atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure… There was also reduced in-hospital mortality among patients admitted for the primary diagnosis of heart failure in DU (cannabis dependent users) and NDU (non-dependent cannabis users) which was not explained by comorbid conditions and demographic data. This study provides important opportunity to explore the preventive mechanism of cannabis on atrial fibrillation and its therapeutic potential in heart failure patients.” Previous studies have similarly reported positive correlations between patients who tested positive for marijuana and survival rates for heart related traumas.

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Review: Marijuana Use Associated With Reduced Mortality

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

According to a scholarly review paper published by the biology department chair at the University of Indiana, South Bend, marijuana use has the potential to reduce rates of obesity, diabetes, opioid abuse, and other conditions that contribute to premature mortality. Authors estimate 23,500 of 47,500 annual premature deaths could be prevented if marijuana was legally regulated at a nationwide scale. This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study: History Of Marijuana Use Associated With Decreased In-Hospital Mortality In Trauma Patients

Photo Credit: NORML

Photo Credit: NORML

According to information published in The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, patients who are hospitalized for trauma and test positive for marijuana at the time of admission are more likely to survive than age-matched controls. Researchers from the University of Arizona looked at the in-hospital mortality rates of 2,678 patients over the course of five years, of which 1,339 tested positive for marijuana and 1,339 tested negative. Authors determined, “Patients with a positive marijuana screen had a lower mortality rate (5.3 percent versus 8.9 percent) compared to patients with a negative marijuana screen. … Prospective studies with long-term follow up will be useful in answering many of the remaining questions surrounding the specific impact of marijuana on outcomes after trauma.”

This information has been provided by NORML and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana Use Linked to Lower Risk of Heart Failure, Cardiac Disease, and In-Hospital Mortality, Study Finds

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A multivariable adjusted study published by Cancer Medicine suggests hospitalized patients who test positive for marijuana have a lower risk of heart failure, cardiac disease, or in-hospitality mortality. Researchers from the University of Northern Colorado, Colorado State University, and the University of Alabama analyzed the relationship between cannabis use and health outcomes in a nationwide sample involving 3.9 million patients over the course of 4 years. Of the patients examined, 387,608 were marijuana users. They found patients who tested positive for marijuana were at lower risk of heart failure and cardiac disease, and while they also were at higher risk of experiencing a stroke, they were more likely to survive that event. 

Researchers wrote, “The odds of in-hospital mortality were significantly reduced among marijuana users compared with non-users overall, and among cancer patients.” They concluded that more research is necessary, but that these results are especially positive for certain populations. Researcher wrote, “Larger prospective studies with objective measures of marijuana use and health outcomes will be needed to better examine these associations. Nevertheless, these findings provide information suggesting that marijuana use is negatively associated with certain health outcomes that may be important for older, sicker population groups.”

This information has been brought to you by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also read text from the study here

Study: History of Marijuana Use Helps Reduce In-Hospital Mortality

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Evidence suggests marijuana may be able to reduce in-hospital mortality by reducing the risk of experiencing heart failure or cardiac disease, and by increasing the survival rate among cancer patients. The study, which can be found in the journal Cancer Medicine, involved researchers from University of Northern Colorado, Colorado State University, and the University of Alabama. They analyzed the links between marijuana use and health outcomes in a nationwide sample of 3.9 million patients in hospitals. While the results suggested hospitalized patients who tested positive for marijuana were more likely than non-users to seek hospitalization for a stroke, they were less likely to suffer heart failure or cardiac disease, and cancer patients experienced increased survival rates. 

Authors of the study wrote, “Odds of in-hospital mortality were significantly reduced among marijuana users compared with non-users in all hospitalized patients as well as cancer patients.” This information is supported by previous findings, which pointed to an increase in survival rate for patients who were hospitalized for a heart attack or traumatic brain injury.

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.