Marijuana's Effects On Your Bones

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

A cannabinoid found in marijuana, cannabidiol (CBD), may boost bone health by strengthening bones and supporting bone fracture healing. In a study from Israel, rats with mild fractures in their femurs were separated into groups that either healed naturally, received CBD as a therapy, or received both CBD and THC therapies. Both groups that received CBD healed faster than those who healed naturally. THC did not seem to influence the healing process. Researcher Yankel Gabet explains, "We found that CBD alone makes bones stronger during healing, enhancing the maturation of the collagenous matrix, which provides the basis for new mineralization of bone tissue… After being treated with CBD, the healed bone will be harder to break in the future."

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study Finds Medical Marijuana Is Helping Kids with Cerebral Palsy

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

A new study conducted by Tikun Olam at the Wolfson Medical Canter near Tel Aviv, Israel, has found cannabis oil significantly reduced symptoms and improved motor skills, sleep quality, bowel movements and general mood in children suffering from Cerebral Palsy. The study, which started three years ago, involved 4o children between the ages 1-17 with high levels of motor disorders, of which 20 have completed testing, and the majority will continue medical marijuana use as an effective supplement alongside current medications. For the first two months, researchers looked for changes in each child’s condition before allowing them to receive medical marijuana. After two months of stability, the children received cannabis oil orally or through a feeding tube three times a day, as a supplement to their current medications. There were two types of oils containing different proportions of THC and CBD.

Researchers used indexes that evaluated medical marijuana’s effects on spasticity, dystonia, motor changes, mood, sleep, constipation, pain, and quality of life, and found after three to four months, the children’s conditions began to improve. They found medical cannabis to be safe with few side effects, and children experienced the strongest improvements, statistically, in motor function, followed by pain relief and improvements in sleep and bowel movements. They also found THC to be most effective for symptom relief, but because of its psychoactive effects, use CBD to buffer these effects. One of the research managers Lihi Bar-Lev Schleider explains, “The THC’s effect is especially relevant to motor function, whether it’s Parkinson’s disease or other motor symptoms… But the THC is also responsible for the psychoactive effect, so we picked a variety that also has a lot of CBD, which moderates the euphoric effect.”

Researchers now want to determine the most effective vehicle for administering the medication. This information has been provided by High Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Israeli Study Exploring CBD Treatment for Autism Yielding Positive Early Results

Photo Credit: Merry Jane

Photo Credit: Merry Jane

Early results from a new study from the Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem, Israel, suggests CBD may be effective for children with autism. In the study, researchers gave 120 children and young adults with mild to severe autism one of two cannabis oil formulas or placebo to see if CBD could benefit the condition. While it's still too early to make any definitive conclusions about the effects of CBD on autism, lead researcher and pediatric neurologist Adi Aran says some children have already become more communicative, stopped hurting themselves or throwing tantrums, and those who could return to class had fewer behavioral problems. 

This information has been provided by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. Stay tuned for the final outcomes of this exciting study. 

New Cannabis Inhaler Changes the Way Doctors Administer Medical Marijuana

Photo Credit: Getty

Photo Credit: Getty

Syqe Medical, a company in Tel Aviv Israel, may have developed a tool that will revolutionize the way patients administer medical cannabis. Their 3D-printed cannabis inhaler not only delivers precise dosing quantities, but it also allows doctors to supply the patients via remote control. The inhalers come pre-loaded with 100-microgram cartridges that can be accessed and controlled wirelessly by doctors and health professionals who need administer and monitor its usage.

Chairman of the company, Etan Hyam, explains, “For doctors, the inhaler solves the problem of prescribing plants for smoking, and offers a solution for patients in that, for the first time, they will be able to receive a precise dose of medical cannabis.” The cannabis inhaler is already approved by the Israeli government for use this year. Elon Eisenberg, director of the Pain Research Department at Rambam Medical Center in Israel, praises this development, saying, “The development of this inhaler fulfills our greatest hopes, to be able to administer accurate and reliable doses of cannabis….[It’s] a breakthrough in cannabis treatment and the medical use of cannabis in Israel and around the world.”

This information has been provided by Marijuana Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Israeli Study of Medical Marijuana Shows Improvements in Users

Photo Credit: Marijuana Industry News

Photo Credit: Marijuana Industry News

One study coming from one of the more advanced countries when it comes to medical marijuana research has revealed patients undergoing medical marijuana treatment experience less pain and are better able to function. The Israeli study led by Professor Pesach Shvartzman from Ben-Gurion University followed medical cannabis patients for two years. Of those who participated in the study, 99.6 percent requested access to medical marijuana due to the fact their prescribed medications were ineffective. Additionally, 55.6 percent of participants said they experienced negative side effects with their prescribed medications.

Most of the patients, about three-quarters, chose to medicate via smoking herbal cannabis. Twenty-one percent of users chose to use oil extracts. At the conclusion of the study, most users reported improvements in pain, anxiety, nausea, appetite, and mood, but 77 percent also experienced minor side effects, like dry mouth, mood alteration or hunger. Only six percent of users reported cannabis as ineffective. 

This information has been provided by Marijuana Industry News and the Daily Chronic, and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.