What Are The Medical Benefits of CBD? - Part 1

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

As legalization proceeds and barriers to medical marijuana research are knocked down, we are becoming more aware of just how powerful wide-reaching medical marijuana is. One of the cannabinoids getting the most attention is cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive cannabinoid that can help a myriad of conditions. In this series, we will discuss some of the many conditions CBD can treat.

Numerous studies have suggested CBD can reduce anxious feelings in those with anxiety disorders, and that it can effectively treated a variety of anxiety disorders, including OCD, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, PTSD, and social anxiety disorder. Studies also suggest CBD could benefit those who suffer from depression. Animal studies have shown CBD acts on the serotonin pathways in the brain, allowing it to act as an antidepressant, and one study found CBD reduces anhedonia, which is a symptom of depression that prevents people from feeling joy or happiness. CBD can also stop nausea and vomiting. One study found CBD effectively helped treat nausea in patients who did not get relief from traditional treatments. CBD may also help those with diabetes, and animal studies have found the cannabinoid slows the progression of diabetes and diabetic inflammations, as well as benefit complications associated with diabetes. CBD may also protect against diabetes, and one study found CBD prevented at-risk mice from developing the condition.

Perhaps the most well-known success story for CBD is its ability to treat epilepsy. CBD has acted as an anticonvulsant in animal models, and GW Pharmaceuticals have been testing their CBD oil Epidiolex with success. In the study, 25 and 50 mg/kg a day lowered seizure frequency by half while producing few mild side effects. Additionally, a 2013 survey of parents of children with treatment-resistant epilepsy found 84% reported reduced seizure frequency with CBD use. Lastly, and contrary to previous beliefs, CBD may treat schizophrenia and mental illnesses related to psychosis. It has been found to be as effective as antipsychotics with fewer side effects, and scientists believe this could be attributed to the stimulation of anandamide production. One study found CBD helped with hallucinations, delusions, lack of emotion, and reduced social functioning. CBD can also benefit those with Parkinson’s disease, and various studies have found CBD can help treat the sleep disturbances and psychosis associated with the disorder without worsening motor symptoms and while improving overall quality of life.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. In tomorrow’s post, we will continue to discuss some of the conditions CBD is able to treat.

The Link Connecting Marijuana and Serotonin - Part 2

Photo Credit: BrainsRusDC (https://bit.ly/3086XCG)

Photo Credit: BrainsRusDC (https://bit.ly/3086XCG)

In our previous post we established the link between Marijuana and serotonin. Now, let’s see what this means in relation to its effects on the body. Researchers suspect the relationship between marijuana and serotonin is what makes it responsible for elevating mood, and benefiting anxiety and depression. Serotonin is an important regulator of mood, emotion, and stress, and when its levels are insufficient, it could cause mental health disorders like anxiety and depression.

One study from 2016 found a drug similar to CBD blocked enzymes that break down endocannabinoids in mice, which resulted in an antidepressant effect. When the mice received a chemical that blocks serotonin, these effects went away, suggesting CBD’s effects on mood may be linked to the serotonergic system. Back in 2006, when the cannabinoid receptor blocker rimonabant was introduced into the market to combat obesity, it was found that these blockers also unintentionally blocked serotonin, thereby causing depression and anxiety in those who took the medication. A study from 2015 also found genetically altered mice who did not have CB1 receptors in their serotonin neurons exhibited increased anxiety. Lastly, a 2011 study found heightened levels of natural cannabinoids increased the efficacy of antidepressants, and that blocking CB1 receptors prevented the antidepressants from working at all.

This concludes our posts on the relationship between serotonin and cannabis, and what this means for us. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

The Link Connecting Marijuana and Serotonin - Part 1

Photo Credit: BrainsRusDC (https://bit.ly/3086XCG)

Photo Credit: BrainsRusDC (https://bit.ly/3086XCG)

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter able to regulate various functions like mood, emotion, appetite, and sleep, and it is found within the brain, GI tract, and blood platelets. It may be closely linked to the endocannabinoid system, which may explain why cannabis is able to benefit those suffering from anxiety and depression. Studies have shown cannabinoids can increase the activity levels of serotonin neurons, and cannabis increases the release of serotonin. In 2007, one study found 20% of the serotonin neurons in mice contained cannabinoid receptors, and endocannabinoids like anandamide were found in areas of the brain where serotonin is usually found. Another study from 2004 found THC increased serotonin levels in mice. Additionally, when their CB1 receptors were blocked, serotonin levels decreased. CBD could also indirectly activate serotonin receptors, and researchers suspect many of CBD’s therapeutic effects, like its ability to benefit anxiety, depression, epilepsy, and provide neuroprotection, pain relief, and nausea relief, could be linked to its activation of a subtype of serotonin receptor.

So now that we know the different ways cannabis interacts with serotonin, what does this mean for its effects on the body? You’ll found out in our next post! This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Cancer Patients in Seattle Effectively Treat Symptoms with Cannabis

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

Information coming from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre in Seattle has found of 926 patients at the Seattle Cancer Centre Alliance in Washington State, nearly a quarter self medicate with cannabis to treat symptoms like physical pain, nausea, stress, insomnia, and depression. In the study, which was published in the journal Cancer, 24% of patients used cannabis within the year, and 21% within the month. Around 66% had used it at some time in their lives. Three-quarters of those surveyed also expressed interest in learning about cannabis from reliable sources like healthcare professionals.

Investigators also found most patients were not receiving their information from healthcare professionals, leading researcher Dr. Steven Pergam to state, “Cancer patients desire but are not receiving information from their cancer doctors about marijuana use during their treatment, so many of them are seeking information from alternate non-scientific sources… We hope that this study helps to open up the door for more studies aimed at evaluating the risks and benefits of marijuana in this population ... This is important, because if we do not educate our patients about marijuana, they will continue to get their information elsewhere.”

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Survey Finds Coloradans Use Marijuana For Sleep and Pain Relief, Not Partying

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

With the wave of legalization gaining popularity in various states across the nation, it is interesting to see the motivations behind marijuana use. In Colorado, where both recreational and medical marijuana are legal, it seems even the recreational users are using marijuana to self medicate, as opposed to using it for fun. The organization Consumer Research Around Cannabis surveyed over 1,200 marijuana users in Denver and it surroundings, and found 47.2% used cannabis as a sleep aid. Another 47.2% used it for pain relief. Falling closely behind, 45.7% used marijuana for anxiety and depression. Only 28.5% used marijuana for recreational fun, and 32.8% responded they used marijuana for expanding creativity and thought processes.

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Cannabis Juicing

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

There are a wide range of vehicles available to medical marijuana patients, and each method offers its own unique benefits. One such method gaining in popularity among the medical marijuana community is cannabis juicing, which involves juicing the raw form of cannabis in order to extract its cannabinoids without experiencing any psychoactive effects. When consuming the raw form of cannabis, patients can access unique cannabinoids that disappear when the plant is heated, like THCA, CBDA, and CBG, which are known to help immune and cell function. Juicing cannabis only works with fresh leaves and flowers that have not been cured or age, and it can take days to weeks before its benefits can take effect.

It is believed cannabis juice may be able to treat depression, anxiety, dementia, stroke, insomnia, fatigue, cancer, pain, diabetes, and immune system disorders. It is also a powerful dietary supplement. Because cannabis juice is non-psychoactive, patients can ingest more of it without feeling unwanted side effects, and can therefore ingest higher amounts of cannabinoids and terpenes. Cannabis juice contains cannabinoids in their acidic forms, and while research is still lacking, what does exist suggests there may be a wide array of therapeutic benefits. THCA has shown promise in treating pain and inflammation, nausea and appetite loss, acting as an anti-proliferative against prostate cancer, and protecting against nerve degeneration. CBDA may also treat nausea and fight the growth of cancerous tumors. 

Cannabis juicing may not be for those diagnosed with kidney or gallbladder disorders, and it can interfere with certain medications. For more information about cannabis juice and for recipes or instructions, visit Leaf Science. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Coping With Bipolar Disorder: How Medical Marijuana Can Help

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

Bipolar disorder (BPD) is a chronic mental illness characterized by extreme mood swings between uncontrollable highs and lows known as mania and depression. Symptoms of BPD may also mimic other illness symptoms, and many patients also suffer from other issues like anxiety disorder, thyroid disease, and migraines or headaches. There are four types of BPD that fall under bipolar disorder 1, bipolar disorder 2, cyclothymic disorder, or other specified and unspecified bipolar related disorders. While research is limited when it comes to medical marijuana for BPD, there are still some studies that suggest the medication could be beneficial. One review published by C.H. Ashton, et al., in the Journal of Psychopharmacology explored the potential for cannabinoids to treat BPD and found anecdotal reports suggested patients took medical cannabis to alleviate both mania and depression symptoms. Authors found THC and CBD, "may exert sedative, hypnotic, anxiolytic, antidepressant, antipsychotic and anticonvulsant effects..."

In 2012, Raphael J. Braga examined the cognitive and clinical outcomes associated with cannabis use in patients with bipolar I disorder. Braga compared clinical and neurocognitive measures in individuals with BPD to a history of cannabis use disorder (CUD) or no history of CUD, specifically looking at clinical and demographic variables and performance on neurocognitive tests. Researchers found those with CUD performed better on measures of attention, processing speed, and working memory. Another study published in PLOS ONE in 2015 asked 24 patients with BPD I or II to write in diaries for 6 days using Experience Sampling Methodology to look at the temporal associations between cannabis, affect, and BPD symptoms. The study found cannabis use coincided with a number of psychological effects, but that there was no evidence that those with BPD were using cannabis to self-medicate in minor fluctuations over the course of daily life.

Lastly, another study published in PLOS ONE in 2016 under Kelly Sagar, et al., looked at a larger study from 2008-2014 involving 12 BPD patients who used cannabis, 18 BPD patients who abstained, 23 cannabis users without BPD, and 21 controls without BPD who also abstained from use. All completed neuropsychological assessments, and some completed daily EMA assessments for four weeks. Researchers found no significant differences in cognitive function between BPD patients who used or did not use cannabis, meaning they did not suffer additional impairment, but BPD patients who regularly smoked cannabis reported reduced mood symptoms, which suggests marijuana may be able to stabilize mood.

This information has been provided by Medical Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

 

Conditions Medical Marijuana Could Help

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Medical cannabis is full of chemical compounds called cannabinoids and terpenes that interact with the body's endocannabinoid system. The different concentrations of compounds allow the plant to have a wide array of different effects, which make cannabis suitable for many different conditions and symptoms, or even combat the side effects of other treatment regimens. For cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, cannabis can alleviate side effects associated with the treatment like fatigue, nausea, pain, loss of appetite, and insomnia. Similarly, HIV/AIDS treatment regimens produce similar side effects that can be alleviated by medical cannabis. 

Patients who suffer from multiple sclerosis experience neurological problems and muscle spasms. Medical Cannabis can help alleviate these symptoms, which can allow patients to gain control over their muscles, regain bladder control, improve vision and mobility, and thereby improve their overall quality of life. Cannabis can help those with epilepsy by reducing the frequency of seizures and even, at times, eliminating them all together. Studies have found CBD is an effective treatment option even in those who suffer from forms that had previously proven treatment-resistant. Chronic pain accompanies a wide range of conditions, but research has found cannabis can be as effective as pharmaceutical options. This offers patients a safer alternative to dangerous pharmaceuticals like opioids. Lastly, some patients with depression or anxiety could benefit from the relaxing properties high-CBD strains of cannabis. 

This information has been brought to you by the Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

 

Some Conditions Medical Marijuana Can Help Treat

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

The Medicinal Marijuana Association has compiled a list of the top five symptoms patients seek to alleviate using medical marijuana therapy.

Medical marijuana is an analgesic, and it is most commonly prescribed to treat pain. This includes neuropathic pain, AIDS, and spinal cord injuries. In addition to treating pain, medical marijuana shown to be as effective as pharmaceutical pain killers, but with a much higher safety profile, so it is equally effective in treating and reducing addiction brought on by pain killers by allowing patients to ween off of and replace these medications. Because marijuana receptors in the brain are responsible for regulating anxiety and stress, medical marijuana (especially CBD-rich strains) can be beneficial for those who suffer anxiety disorders. Marijuana can also help those who suffer from fatigue, insomnia, restlessness, and pain fall asleep, stay asleep longer, and experience higher quality of sleep.  

Medical marijuana also helps lower levels of depression with fewer side effects than anti-depressants. The medication also helps treat nausea, which is especially effective for cancer and AIDS patients. By reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and inducing appetite, medical marijuana can fight cachexia and help patients to gain weight. This also makes medical marijuana effective for those diagnosed with Crohn's disease, which irritates the small intestine. Medical marijuana therapy can reduce pain and diarrhea while increasing appetite and weight gain. Medical marijuana is also effective in treating muscle spasms and stiffness typical of multiple sclerosis. This helps MS patients improve sleep, walking, and other daily activities that would otherwise interfere with quality of life. 

This information has been provided by Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

 

Medical Marijuana for Fatigue and Depression

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

The use of medical marijuana in the treatment of depression is controversial, but some studies do suggest the medication could be beneficial in its treatment and the treatment of its associated symptoms like fatigue, pain, stress, and anxiety. One study from the University of Buffalo suggests marijuana may be able to positively alter chronic stress, of which depression is linked to. Stress chips away at endocannabinoids in the brain, so it is suggested cannabis may be able to restore these chemical compounds in order to return to homeostasis and create a balanced mood. The study was originally conducted on animals, but the study's authors have since continued exploring these results for verification. 

The findings from another study from McGill University in 2007 creates a clear discovery of how marijuana mimics the effects of endocannabinoids, and how those endocannabinoids directly influence serotonin, which is a vital chemical in the fight against depression. The authors determined marijuana could benefit depression, as long as patients don't consume too high of a dose. 

This information has been provided by the Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

New Study Suggests Marijuana May Benefit Mental Health

Photo Credit: Flickr @ Jordan Greentree

Photo Credit: Flickr @ Jordan Greentree

In a recent report published in the journal Clinical Psychology Review, researchers have found cannabis may be able to help those who suffer from depression, social anxiety, and PTSD. That being said, they did not find it beneficial for those who suffer from bipolar disorder. The study looked through 60 different studies to see if cannabis could be useful as a therapy in relation to mental health, especially on adult psychopathology and assessment. Of those studies, 31 articles discusses cannabis for therapeutic purposes and mental health, and 29 articles that discussed mental health and cannabis but not for therapeutic purposes. 

Author of the study, and associate professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia, says, "This is a substance that has potential use for mental health... We should be looking at it in the same way [as other drugs] and be holding it up to the same standard.” The author also noted its potential in combatting the opioid epidemic, and in turn benefiting public health. 

This information has been brought to you by Marijuana Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

β-Caryophyllene: A Terpene For Anxiety and Depression?

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Beta-caryophyllene, a terpene found in the essential oils of cannabis and other plants, may have positive effects on anxiety and depression, study finds. In one study from 2008, German researchers found the terpene also acts in similar ways to cannabinoids in that it has the ability to bind with CB2 receptors throughout the body. Now, a new study published in the journal Physiology & Behavior suggested the terpene may treat anxiety and depression in mice.

The authors from the United Arab Emirates University wrote, “The present study has clearly demonstrated the anxiolytic and anti-depressant effect of β-caryophyllene and its underlying mechanism in a CB2 receptor-dependent manner in rodents...The results also support the involvement of the CB2 receptor in the regulation of emotional behavior and suggest that this receptor could be a relevant therapeutic target for the treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders.” 

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

MMJ for Depression

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc

Depression illnesses are brain disorders caused by genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors, and they produce emotional problems, sadness, hopelessness, anger, disinterest, loss of pleasure, sleep disturbances, energy loss, anxiety, changes in appetite, and the feeling of worthlessness. Currently, depression is treated with pharmaceutical medications or psychological counseling, but now medical cannabis is being analyzed as a potential treatment option because of its antidepressant and antipsychotic effects. 

It's already well-known that the endocannabinoid system is linked to mood management, so many believe cannabinoids could play a role in regulating the endocannabinoid system and therefore stabilize a person's mood. Studies have confirmed this theory, and both THC and CBD have sedative, antidepressant, and antipsychotic effects. In an animal trial, cannabinoids restores endocannabinoid function and therefore stabilized mood and reduced depression. Other animal trials found CBD had anti-anxiety and antidepressant effects at a rapid rate, and evidence suggests it is thanks to CBD's interaction with the 5-HT1A neuro-receptor. A human study found people who used THC were less negative when processing their emotions, and both CBD and THC reduced a response to fearful faces.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Understanding Cannabidiol (CBD) - Part 3

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Today we will continue our discussion of the therapeutic effects of CBD on a multitude of specific conditions.

CBD relieves cardiovascular diseases by reducing myocardial dysfunction, cardiac fibrosis, oxidative-nitrative stress, inflammation, cell death, and interrelated signaling pathways. It also reduces infarct size and myocardial inflammation when administered directly after a heart attack, making it a potential treatment for myocardial ischemia. CBD may fight the progression of cirrhosis by aiding hepatic stellate cell (HSC) death, thereby proliferating and producing excess collagen which allows for the accumulation of scarring on the liver. It also restored liver function in mice with liver failure and it provided protection against ischemia reperfusion, the pivotal mechanism of tissue damage in cirrhosis. Patients who suffer from depression can benefit from CBD's antidepressant and anti-anxiety properties.

CBD's anti-inflammatory properties and ability to control the pro-inflammatory response in the digestive tract make it a potential treatment option for crohn's diseases and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Those who suffer from diabetes benefit from CBD's ability to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines in the blood stream. CBD treatments provide significant protection from diabetic retinopathy. CBD is probably most well known for its effects on epilepsy and seizure disorders because it reduces or eliminates seizures, even in severe pediatric variations like Dravet syndrome, Doose, syndrome, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. The cannabinoid also improves sleep, alertness, and mood in epileptic children. CBD's analgesic properties allow it to lower pain levels in a variety of conditions, including headaches and migraines, spasticity, sickle cell anemia, and other acute pain and chronic pain conditions.

This concludes part 3 of our CBD series, and we will continue the in depth discussion of conditions that can benefit from its use in the next post. This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Understanding Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) - Part 3

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

In today's post, we will continue our discussion of THC in the treatment of various conditions and diseases.

THC has proven effective in stimulating appetite and stabilizing body weight in AIDS/HIV patients and cancer patients suffering from cachexia. THC further helps cancer patients by reducing tumor sizes, reducing conditioned rejection and chemotherapy-induce nausea, increasing comfort throughout the treatment process, and working alongside CBD to reduce pain levels. THC can help those who suffer from Crohn's disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome through its anti-inflammatory properties and its ability to reduce abdominal pain, nausea, and diarrhea. It has even helped some attain complete remission. THC reduces the brain's response to negative stimuli, so it may be able to help treat depression. THC also reduces the risk of diabetes by reducing glucose intolerance, improving glucose tolerance, and increasing insulin sensitivity. 

THC not only induces apoptosis of leukemia cells, but it also can enhance the power of other cytotoxic agents to increase leukemia cell death. THC's anti-inflammatory properties make it a potential treatment for lupus and other inflammatory disorders. THC can inhibit the pain response from migraines. It can also reduce pain and decrease muscle spasticity for multiple sclerosis patients. THC also manages pain levels from nail-patella syndrome, as well as lowering the risk and the progression of glaucoma and kidney disease. While THC has the ability to stimulate appetite and weight gain in some, it is, quite surprisingly, also associated with a lower rate of obesity than those who do not consume the cannabinoid.

We will continue our discussion of THC in relation to various conditions in the following post. This information has been brought to you by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

The Top Reasons People Use Medical Marijuana

Photo Credit: Chuck Grimmett/Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/cagrimmett/6307374507/in/photostream/)

Photo Credit: Chuck Grimmett/Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/cagrimmett/6307374507/in/photostream/)

Medical marijuana is becoming a popular therapeutic regimen among patients treating a wide array of conditions, but why are patients flocking to this alternative natural therapy? A report in California from HelloMD looked into the top reasons people are using medical marijuana based on cannabis use, preference, and perspective, and this is what they it found. 

Out of 1,400 patients that participated in the survey, 66% use medical marijuana as their primary treatment method, and the number one condition treated with medical marijuana was anxiety, followed by pain, stress, back pain, insomnia, and depression. In addition to treating their actual medical conditions, patients also used medical marijuana to help them relax, sleep, elevate their mood, and replace alcohol use. Although treating the same medical conditions, men and women differ on their preferred method of ingestion. Men seem to prefer smoking or vaporizing their medication, while women seem to prefer topical creams and tinctures. 

Do you use medical marijuana to treat any of these symptoms? Journal it on our app so that you can anonymously contribute to a better understanding of medical marijuana! This information has been provided by Att: and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Overdosing on Marijuana: Survival Tips For “Greening Out”

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

CannaBest Medical strives to provide medical marijuana patients symptom relief without unwanted side effects interfering with daily life. We aim to do so not only by allowing patients to journal their dose so they can discover and keep track of their ideal dose, but also by providing helpful graphs that simplify the anonymous and successful dosing regimens of other patients. That being said, sometimes encountering side effects along the way towards your premium dose is inevitable. In order to overcome a negative psychoactive experience, it is important to understand what causes it. THC, one of the more prominent and well known cannabinoids in cannabis, activates CB1 and CB2 receptors in the body. When it binds to CB1 receptors in the nervous system, a psychoactive effect is produced. Consuming too much cannabis in a small amount of time can intensify these effects and produce an unpleasant experience. Although it is nearly impossible for these overdoses to be fatal or harmful, it is still an uncomfortable experience that lasts anywhere from thirty minutes to many hours. 

To overcome this experience, stay calm, relax, breathe deeply, think of a happy place, and sleep it off. That advice seems common-sense, but some lesser-known tips can be helpful for easing symptoms as well. Cannabis has been associated with lower blood sugar, so if you're naturally prone to swings in blood sugar levels, overdose symptoms could be related thereto. Try boosting your blood sugar by consuming natural sugars, like in honey and fruit. Paranoia and anxiety is often caused by too much THC, so increasing other cannabinoids like CBD can balance out THC's psychoactive effect. Many suggest chewing on black pepper to overcome paranoia, and the "black pepper myth" is not scientifically baseless. One study found the beta-caryophyllene in black pepper and various plants helped to treat anxiety and depression in mice, and it also induced drowsiness. That being said, those affected by blood sugar should use caution as black pepper is known to further lower blood sugar levels.

CannaBest Medical reminds you to stay informed about your cannabis dosing regimen and to use marijuana responsibly in order to prevent this experience. This information has been provided by Medical Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Linalool Cannabis Terpene

Photo Credit: Whaxy

Photo Credit: Whaxy

Medical marijuana patients are most likely familiar with the cannabinoids of marijuana that are responsible for providing a lot of the medical relief the plant is accredited with, but not everyone knows so much about terpenes which are also responsible for providing medicinal benefits. There are over 20,000 terpenes in nature, 200 of which exist in cannabis. One of these terpenes is Linalool.

Linalool may not be a major terpene, but studies have found it can alleviate a variety of symptoms, including pain, depression, seizures, inflammation, and even insomnia. The terpene is considered an analgesic, making it a popular method for treating conditions like multiple sclerosis, dystonia, arthritis, post-operative pain, and chronic pain. That anti-inflammatory properties of linalool make it an effective molecule for combatting inflammation-based diseases like Crohn's, arthritis, asthma, Alzheimer's, fibromyalgia, dermatitis, IBS, lupus, and Parkinson's disease. The terpene also acts like an antidepressant, an anti-convulsant for those who suffer from seizures, and a sedative or sleep aid. 

Linalool is promising as a key player for providing therapeutic relief, but more research is left to be desired in order to understand exactly how the terpene is able to do so and how it interacts with other terpenes and cannabinoids to provide optimal relief. This information has been provided by Whaxy and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis for Chemotherapy

Photo Credit: Whaxy

Photo Credit: Whaxy

When a patient is diagnosed with a form of cancer, a rigorous treatment process involving chemotherapy is usually soon to follow. What many don't know, however, is that chemotherapy is used for more than just cancer treatment, so chemotherapy is a process that affects many. Chemotherapy is not an easy therapy as it produces various negative side effects, but patients choose to undergo the treatment in an attempt to battle their illnesses which are far worse.

Whaxy says, "Medically speaking, the side effects of chemotherapy include a decrease in the production of blood cells within the bones (myelosuppression), inflammation of the lining of the digestive tract (mucositis), and hair loss (alopecia). In terms of patient suffering, chemotherapy brings on severe nausea, vomiting, and dry heaves, in addition to a slew of other negative side effects." Because of this, the idea that cannabis can combat the side effects of chemotherapy is welcomed news. 

Chemotherapy involves large amounts of chemicals and high levels of radiation that attack cancer cells to a point they can no longer tolerate, often killing the cells, and hopefully eliminating the spread of the disease and putting the illness into remission. This process also hurts the patient's good cells, so chemo is extremely taxing on the patient's health and well being. Cannabis may be able to play a role in combatting the negative side effects as well as deliver healing therapy through its miraculous cannabinoids and terpenes which have been shown to fight cancer in certain studies.

Cannabis can help fight chemotherapy's side effects by combatting nausea, stimulating appetite, reducing inflammation, and alleviating pain. In addition to fighting the physical ailments that coincide with chemotherapy, cannabis can help treat psychological side effects like depression and anxiety. Patients who choose to experiment with cannabis in their treatment of cancer and chemotherapy's side effects are not limited to smoking their medication; they can also vaporize cannabis flowers or concentrates, consume edibles, apply topical creams or ointments, use sublingual sprays, or insert suppositories to reach their desired relief.

At this point in time, much more clinical research on human cancer patients is necessary to understand how cannabis is able fight cancer and the side effects of chemotherapy. Until then, visit Whaxy for an in depth analysis of how cannabis works to reduce chemo's side effects and specific testimonies regarding their ability to do so.

Beta-Caryophyllene (BCP)

Photo Credit: Whaxy

Photo Credit: Whaxy

It seems the amount of information we can learn about the tiny cannabinoids and terpenes is endless. This may be because there are tens of thousands of these molecules found in nature, and 200 different terpenes and 111 different cannabinoids are present in the cannabis plant. Whaxy does an excellent job analyzing cannabinoids and terpenes, and today's feature will discuss the Beta-caryophyllene (BCP) terpene. 

Beta-caryophyllene doesn't exist in the cannabis plant alone; it can also be found in cloves, oregano, hops, rosemary, and black pepper. BCP targets the CB2 receptors in the body, meaning it does not contribute to the euphoric high commonly associated with cannabis. Whaxy says, "BCP is an effective way to medicate while avoiding any alteration in perception or motor skills. It can be used to treat several inflammatory disorders, including arthritis and multiple sclerosis... BCP has also been show to fight cancer, reduce anxiety and depression, and has even been found to be gastroproductive - meaning it can be used to treat ulcers." BCP works best alongside other terpenes and cannabinoids in what is called "the entourage effect."

A study published in 2014 in the journal Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior suggests BCP could be effective in combatting alcoholism. In the study, BCP was injected into animals, resulting in decreased ethanol consumption and preference. Because BCP is not exclusive to the cannabis plant, it is legal and abundant. That being said, BCP is thought to be more effective supplementing other cannabinoids and terpenes found within the cannabis plant, and we will not know its full potential until marijuana is reclassified and studied further. 

Read in detail about Beta-caryophyllene on Whaxy