Canadian Scientists Are Using Marijuana to Help People With Crack Cocaine Addictions

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

A new study coming from researchers in Canada suggests marijuana may be able to help curb crack cocaine addiction. The study looked at 100 people addicted to crack cocaine who had used another drug in an attempt to stop use. Of those involved, marijuana was substance that was most successful in decreasing the rate of crack usage. This study supports another study coming from Brazil, in which 68% of the 25 participants involved were able to cease crack usage with the help of marijuana.

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study Suggests Cannabis May Help Crack Addicts Reduce Use

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

Researchers from the BC Centre on Substance Use in Vancouver surveyed over 100 crack users in the city between the years of 2012 and 2015 and found cannabis may be able to help reduce crack cocaine addiction. The data was sourced from three prospective cohorts of more than 2,000 drug users. Some users intentionally used cannabis to control their addiction, and saw crack consumption drop significantly, with the proportion of daily reporters dropping from 35% to 20%. The BC Centre on Substance use would like to continue examining whether cannabis could be an effective tool for those looking to reduce their use of crack or other stimulants. 

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Research Says Cannabis Helps Fight Addiction

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Research is mounting suggesting cannabis can help fight addiction. One study published in the Journal of American Medicine (JAMA) found states with legalized medical cannabis experienced 24.8% lower mean annual opioid overdose mortality rates than states where medical marijuana was illegal. Another study found states saw a sharp decrease in patients admitted for opioid abuse after legalizing medical marijuana. Patients also spent less on prescription drugs for depression, anxiety, and sleep disorders, as a result of cannabis use. Researchers from the University of Montreal and the University of British Columbia found patients used cannabis to cope with crack cocaine addiction, and concluded, “Given the substantial global burden of morbidity and mortality attributable to crack cocaine use disorders alongside a lack of effective pharmacotherapies, we echo a call for rigorous experimental research on cannabinoids as a potential treatment for crack cocaine use disorders.”

Cannabis users and former heroin addicts are also more likely to complete their addiction treatment program than non-cannabis users. Lastly, cannabis can also combat addiction to legal substances like cigarettes and alcohol. One clinical trial found CBD helped patients reduce their cigarette use by 40% in comparison with patients who received placebo. Another study found 40% of medical marijuana patients were able to reduce their alcohol consumption. Authors call for a desire for more research, but say, “cannabis does appear to be a potential substitute for alcohol.” Additionally, cannabis may ease alcohol withdrawal symptoms. 

This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study: Cannabis Use Associated With Decreased Crack Cocaine Consumption

Photo Credit: Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: Daily Chronic

Longitudinal data published in the journal Addictive Behaviors suggests cannabis consumption is associated with a decline in crack cocaine use. Canadian researchers looked at cannabis and crack cocaine use in a group of 122 subjects for three years, and found intentional cannabis use reduced the frequency of crack cocaine use. Authors write, "In this longitudinal study, we observed that a period of self-reported intentional use of cannabis … was associated with subsequent periods of reduced use of crack [cocaine]. … Given the substantial global burden of morbidity and mortality attributable to crack cocaine use disorders alongside a lack of effective pharmacotherapies, we echo calls for rigorous experimental research on cannabinoids as a potential treatment for crack cocaine use disorders.”

This study supports other findings suggesting cannabis may have beneficial implications for the treatment of addiction in a variety of substances. This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic an approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Researchers Find That Cannabis Use Can Help Curb Crack & Cocaine Addiction

Researchers in Canada have found marijuana may be able to help those suffering from crack cocaine disorders ween off of their addiction. Between the years 2012 and 2015, 122 participants said marijuana helped lower their use of crack. While the study mainly focused on crack users, the pharmacological similarity between crack and cocaine allows researchers to speculate about the effectiveness of cannabis for cocaine users as well. This report supports similar findings from a Brazilian study from 2015, in which marijuana seemed to reduce addictive behavior and aggressiveness, as well as promote relaxation, in those addicted to crack and cocaine. Even studies involving rodent models found mice who were addicted to cocaine and who were taught to self-administer it reduced their use significantly after the administration of a synthetic cannabinoid compound. Still, while this information is hopeful, researchers believe further clinical research is left to be desired before they can make any solid conclusions. 

This information has been provided by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis a Potential Treatment for Crack Cocaine Disorders, Study Suggests

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Through the many studies analyzing the use of medical marijuana for pain management, researchers have found cannabis effectively reduces the use of opioids and subsequently fights the harmful side effects of addiction. Now, a new study suggests this fight against addiction can extend to other substances like crack cocaine, saying intentional use of cannabis can help those with crack cocaine disorders and reduce their frequency of crack use. The study, which was led by Dr. M-J Milloy from the University of British Columbia's St. Paul's Hospital and published in Addictive Behaviors, looked at the use of cannabis on the frequency of crack cocaine use among those who abused the substance. During periods of intentional cannabis use, the frequency of crack cocaine use among participants decreased.

Researchers used data from three prospective Vancouver-based cohort studies between 2012 and 2015 and adjusted analyses to compare use before, during, and after intentional cannabis use. They found crack use was significantly lower after periods of cannabis use than before, but during these periods, use was not significantly different. Following these periods, cannabis use remained higher when compared to before these periods, but use was lower than within these intentional use periods. An earlier study found cannabis reduced cravings and helped cease the use of crack in 68% of abusers.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. Text of the study can be accessed here