What Is CBDV (Cannabidivarin) And What Does It Do?

Photo Credit: High Times

Photo Credit: High Times

There are over 100 known cannabinoids in cannabis, but many are only familiar with the well-known cannabinoids like cannabidiol or tetrahydrocannabinol. One lesser known cannabinoid is cannabidivarin (CBDV), a non-psychoactive cannabinoid that acts as an antiemetic and anticonvulsant. The cannabinoid is similar structurally to CBD, and like CBD, it may be able to help treat those who suffer from epilepsy and nausea. One study from 2013 found CBDV significantly reduced chemically-induced seizures. Another study from 2014 found the cannabinoid interactive with receptors responsible for detecting and regulating body temperatures and producing pain sensations. The Italian research team also noted CBDV reduced the duration and strength of simulated epileptic seizures in the brains of rats. Lastly, a study from 2013 published in the British Journal of Pharmacology found CBDV may have interacted with CCB1 receptors to reduce nausea in rats. The pharmaceutical company GW Pharmaceuticals is currently conducting clinical trials researching the use of CBDV.

This information has been provided by High Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

All About Cannabinoids - Part 2

Photo Credit: Toomaj F. Bungs | pexels (https://bit.ly/2I6rtyq)

Photo Credit: Toomaj F. Bungs | pexels (https://bit.ly/2I6rtyq)

In the previous post, we introduced the powerful chemicals in cannabis known as cannabinoids. Now, we will discuss in detail the unique properties found in cannabis.

Most people are aware of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is a cannabinoid that binds with the CB1 receptor in the brain and is responsible for producing the psychoactive effect of feeling “high.” THC is one of the more prevalent cannabinoids in marijuana, and it may be beneficial for patients who need to reduce nausea and vomiting, and pain. Although THC can offer therapeutic benefits, side effects include rapid heart rate, bloodshot eyes, dry mouth, dizziness, sedation, short-term memory, impaired concentration, and in severe cases, panic attack, hallucinations, and vomiting when consumed in large amounts. The other most well known cannabinoid is cannabidiol (CBD). CBD is popular for medicinal purposes because it does not produce a psychoactive effect, and can even buffer against the psychoactive effects of THC. CBD can help those who suffer from anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia, and most famously, pediatric epilepsy. It provides neuroprotective benefits and is known reduce pain and inflammation.

The cannabinoids cannabinol (CBN) is known for its antibacterial and analgesic properties, anticonvulsant and sedative effects, and appetite stimulation. Cannabichromene (CBC), like CBD, does not produce psychoactive effects. CBC acts as an analgesic, an antidepressant, and has antibacterial and antifungal properties. The cannabinoid could help treat those with acne or diarrhea. Cannabigerol (CBG) is a building block for all other cannabinoids, and it is known for providing pain relief, antifungal and antibacterial effects, reduce inflammation, and neuroprotective effects.

This concludes our short series on the cannabinoids in marijuana. To learn more, visit the Leaf Science website. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

All About Cannabinoids - Part 1

Photo Credit: Toomaj F. Bungs | pexels (https://bit.ly/2I6rtyq)

Photo Credit: Toomaj F. Bungs | pexels (https://bit.ly/2I6rtyq)

There are 113 known cannabinoids found in marijuana. Cannabinoids are the chemicals in marijuana that interact with cannabinoid receptors within the body’s endocannabinoid system in ways that mimic the body’s naturally produced endocannabinoids, which allows them to produce medicinal and recreational benefits. Because the endocannabinoid system is responsible for regulating appetite, sleep, pain, mood, and memory, medical marijuana is capable of producing a wide range of therapeutic benefits. Most people are familiar with the two most popular and well known cannabinoids, THC and CBD, but there are so many more cannabinoids that also offer medicinal benefits. In the following post, we will discuss in more detail what makes these cannabinoids unique and powerful.

This information has been brought to you by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What is CBN (Cannabinol)?

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Cannabinol (CBN) is one of the 113 identified therapeutic cannabinoids found in marijuana, which not only interacts with the endocannabinoid system to provide its own unique effects, but which also boosts the effects of other cannabinoids like CBD and THC. Because CBN does not fit well with CB1 receptors and has difficulty binding with CB2 receptors, CBN produces only minor psychoactive effects if produced at all. CBN is present in cannabis in very small proportions, and is produced by the degradation of THC after exposure to high temperatures or after aging in improper storage. Researchers have found CBN has strong antibacterial properties, and in one study it showed strong antibacterial effects against strains of antibiotic-resistant MRSA. CBN may also act as an anticonvulsant, although other cannabinoids like CBD remain more potent as an anticonvulsant. CBN may combat inflammation by influencing immune cells to produce anti-inflammatory effects and by altering levels of the compounds that cause inflammation.

Cannabinol may also increase appetite, according to rodent models in which rats receiving CBN ate larger amounts of food for longer periods of time and more frequently. In Lewis lung carcinoma, researchers have found CBN is effective at reducing tumor growth. CBN may also be effective at reliving pain through stimulating the release of peptides from sensory nerves, which decreases sensations of pain. When combined with THC, CBN may be able to enhance effects of sedation and promote more effective sleep. CBN may also act as a vasorelaxant, so that it relaxes blood vessel walls and thereby lowers blood pressure. Lastly, CBN may recruit stem cells from bone marrow to help heal bones. CBN increases fibroblast cells, making it beneficial for the bone-healing process.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Best Practices for Using Cannabis Topicals

Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Cannabis topicals consist of lotions, creams, moisturizers, balms, salves, liniments, or ointments, and offer a method for administering cannabinoids like THC and CBD in a way that doesn’t require smoking or produce psychoactive effects. Topicals are desirable because they offer localized relief that targets the areas that produce aches and pains. To effectively use topicals, it’s important to understand where source of the pain is, as opposed to where the pain is manifesting. For example, a headache may not be produced by the head, but rather by tension in the neck or other parts of the body. It is also important to clean the area before application so that your skin absorbs the beneficial cannabinoids without unwanted bacterias. It is then recommended to apply the topical generously and vigorously and actually massage it into the skin. Then, you can expect to feel subtle relief that may not necessarily cure your aches and pains, but that will make them feel more bearable.

This information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Cannabinoids 101: What Makes Cannabis Medicine?

Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Cannabinoids are the chemical compounds within the cannabis plant that mimic compounds our bodies already produce called endocannabinoids. Because of this, these plant based cannabinoids have the ability to interact with cannabinoid receptors in our body in order provide a wide range of therapeutic effects, among them being relief from pain, nausea, anxiety, and inflammation. The effect a cannabis strain is able to produce is dependent on the strain’s cannabinoid composition and on how these cannabinoids bind to the different receptors in our bodies. Some pharmaceutical medications have produced synthetic cannabinoids in order to produce symptom relief that imitates that produced by the cannabis plant. Some of these medications include Marinol, Nabilone, and Rimonabant. However, isolating and mimicking these compounds means that the relief they provide are highly targeted and limited, and research has shown herbal cannabis elicits a wider variety of therapeutic effects.

It is important to understand which types of cannabinoids work best for treating your symptoms so that you can discover optimal relief. With our app’s journaling function, you can easily monitor your dosing regimen so that you can keep track of what works and what doesn’t. If you don’t know where to begin, our physician approved guidelines can point you towards a good starting point, from which you can begin to titrate and and make alterations based on your personal preferences.

This information has been provided in part by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also visit their page for a helpful infographic detailing cannabinoids that may help treat specific symptoms. While the infographic does not provide information regarding how much of each cannabinoid you should aim for, it could help in understanding what to look for when visiting your nearest dispensary.

Cannabinoids May Be Effective for Treating Alzheimer's Disease, Finds New Study

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Researchers from the Anesthesiology Institute at Cleveland Clinic have determined agonists of the CB2 receptor provide neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects that reduce brain cell damage, which could have beneficial implications for those who suffer from Alzheimer's disease. In the animal study, which was published in the European Journal of Pharmacology, researchers administered CB2 agonists which resulted helped to suppress neuroinflammation and enhance the removal of amyloid-beta plaques, which led to an increase in brain cell recovery and an improvement in cognitive performance. Researchers used the CB2 agonist MDA7 to mimic the effects of cannabinoids. 

The researchers right, "CB2 receptors act as a negative feedback regular; when activated by a CB2 agonist, they can help limit the extent of the neuroinflammatory response and the subsequent development of neuronal damage in the central nervous system... Collectively, these findings suggest that [a CB2 agonist] has a potential therapeutic effect in the setting of AD.” This study supports the findings of previous studies involving cannabinoids and Alzheimer's disease, and suggests cannabinoids could also be beneficial for other degenerative neuroinflammatory diseases.  

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc, and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can find the text of the study here

Study Examines How Cannabinoids Elicit Anti-Cancer Effects

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A recent research review led by Dr. Guillermo Velasco of Complutense University of Madrid and published in Current Oncology looked into previous studies that examined the molecular mechanisms of the actions cannabinoids use to combat cancer. In the review, the researchers discuss how THC and CBD interact with CB1 and CB2 receptors to initiate chemical reactions that suppress tumor growth. To highlight the importance of the CB1 receptor, one animal study found removing CB1 receptors accelerates tumor growth in the intestines. Another found cannabinoids that interact with CB1 receptors reduce levels of cancerous precursors. Additionally, the removal of enzymes that harm cannabinoids results in the reduction of tumor growth in mice. Through binding to CB1 and CB2 receptors, cannabinoids impair the progression of tumors and induce apoptosis which kills cancer cells and prevents them from spreading.

Other preclinical studies have found cannabinoids stimulate the production of ceramide, a compound known to induce apoptosis, and enhance the expression of p8 (NUPR 1), a stress regulated protein that stimulates autophagy mediated cancer cell death and regulates tumorigenesis and tumor progression. CBD is also able to promote apoptotic death in cancer cells independently of CB1 and CB2 receptors. Cannabinoids also work together with anticancer drugs to reduce tumor growth, and THC and CBD when combined with radiotherapy or cancer drugs enhance anti-cancer effects. Valesco Concludes, “To summarize, cannabinoids induce tumour cell death and inhibit tumour angiogenesis and invasion in animal models of cancer, and there are indications that they act similarly in patients with glioblastoma... Given that cannabinoids show an acceptable safety profile, clinical trials testing them as single drugs, or ideally, in combination therapies in glioblastoma and other types of cancer are both warranted and urgently needed.”

 

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc, and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can find the full text of the study here.

Cannabinoids and Chemotherapy Combine for Superior Anti-Leukemia Effects, Study Finds

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Researchers from St. George's University of London have discovered cannabinoids contribute to the death of leukemia cells. The study, which was led by Dr. Wai Liu and published in the International Journal of Oncology, revealed that while the cannabinoids effectively destroyed cancerous tumors alone, they were more effective when administered along with chemotherapy. In fact, even when used with lower doses of chemotherapy, they seemed to produce the same level of effect, suggesting cannabinoids could help patients to reduce the required chemotherapy dosage, and therefore reduce the side effects that accompany it. They also determined that the sequence of administration was instrumental in whether or not the cannabinoid and chemotherapy combination was effective. Cannabinoids administered before chemotherapy reduced the death of cancer cells, while cannabinoids administered after chemotherapy increased the induction of apoptosis.

The team of researchers tested different combinations of cannabinoids on leukemia cells in a laboratory and found that both CBD and THC demonstrated anti-cancer properties. It was determined that CBD and THC worked better as a pair than they did in isolation. Although these cannabinoids were administered in extremely pure and high concentrations, which could not be extracted from the natural, smokable plant, Liu said, “cannabinoids are a very exciting prospect in oncology, and studies such as ours serve to establish the best ways that they should be used to maximize a therapeutic effect." Additionally, Liu explains the importance of his study, saying, "We have shown for the first time that the order in which cannabinoids and chemotherapy are used is crucial in determining the overall effectiveness of this treatment."

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also find the full text of the study here.

Researchers Find Evidence That Cannabinoids Help Treat Cancerous Tumors

Photo Credit: Max Pixel (https://bit.ly/2tb5HQg).

Photo Credit: Max Pixel (https://bit.ly/2tb5HQg).

Researchers from the University of London have determined cannabinoids not only support chemotherapy treatment but also decrease the growth of new tumors. In the study, which was led by Dr. Wai Liu and published in the International Journal of Oncology, a team of researchers observed the effects of different cannabinoid combinations on leukemia cells in order to determine whether or not cannabinoids enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapy treatments and to see in which order they worked most effectively. They concluded cannabinoids had an extremely positive impact on the success of chemotherapy, especially when taken after treatments. Not only did cannabis enhance chemotherapy treatments, but it also prevented the growth of new tumor cells and tumor-feeding blood vessels. The team extended their findings through studies involving cannabis-based extracts on animals, and found cannabinoids could be equally effective for glioblastoma.

While this information is positive, patients must understand that the study involved concentrated and purified cannabis extracts, so simply smoking cannabis probably would not produce the same results. If you're using medical marijuana to treat your cancer symptoms or combat tumor growth, we want to know! Whether you're using extracts or another vehicle of cannabis consumption, the anonymous information you provide could help the medical marijuana community better understand how to use the therapy to treat cancer and alleviate its symptoms. By journaling daily, you can provide vital data to physicians, researchers, and other patients, all while keeping your personal information completely private. Additionally, you'll discover insights into your own unique dosing regimen so that you can discover the most consistent and effective method for you. 

This information has been provided in part by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Why You Should Use Cannabinoids and Terpenes to Choose Strains

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

As marijuana research begins to reveal the secrets behind the therapeutic makeup of varying strains, it's becoming better understood just how important the different cannabinoid and terpenoid content is in providing relief. Currently, many dispensaries categorize their strains based on the amount of THC present, but in doing so they ignore the powerful effects produced by other cannabinoids and terpenes, and the benefits produced as they work in tandem in what is known as the entourage effect. For example, a strain containing CBN, CBG, D-limonene, linalool, a-pinene, and myrcene, may work simultaneously to produce anti-inflammatory effects while promoting energy and creativity.

In addition to knowing which cannabinoids and terpenes are present in a cannabis strain, it is also important to understand the concentrations of each compound. The varying presence of cannabinoids and terpenes can greatly alter the effects produced. Keeping track of this information can get difficult and overwhelming, but CBMed has made this process easy for you! Simply document this information in the journaling section of our app, and take note of how effective it is relieving your symptoms. That way, you can look back at your entries when picking out strains so that you can choose the one that is most effective in providing therapeutic relief. For the best results, we recommend journaling every time you dose, so that you can see which strains produce consistent relief. 

This information has been provided in part by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Research Finds Cannabinoids May Help Treat Certain Skin Diseases

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new research review conducted by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus suggests the anti-inflammatory properties found in cannabinoids may be able to soothe skin conditions like psoriasis, eczema, atopic and contact dermatitis, and even melanomas. Headed by Dr. Robert Dellavalle, MD, researchers looked at literature surrounding cannabinoids and skin conditions. In one study, cannabinoids that were injected into skin tumors in mice prevented the growth of the tumors. Another study found THC reduced swelling and inflammation in mice. In yet another study, 8/21 patients who used cannabinoids topically twice a day over the course of three weeks witnessed symptoms of itching eliminated. Through topical applications, active compounds penetrate and are absorbed through the skin, where they can interact with nearby cells' receptors without providing any psychotropic effects. 

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Three Different Cannabinoid-Based Medicines Approved by the FDA

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

There are many patients who may want to begin cannabinoid therapy but live in states where cannabis remains inaccessible. Luckily, the FDA has recognized cannabinoids may be effective in treating AIDS wasting syndrome, epilepsy, neuropathic pain, spasticity from multiple sclerosis, cancer, and chemotherapy-induced nausea, and so they have approved of three cannabinoid-based medications using isolated synthetics: Marinol, Syndros, and Cesamet. 

Marinol, which is the oral form of dronabinol (a synthetic THC), is used to treat anorexia resulting from weight loss in patients with AIDS, and nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy in patients who don't respond well to antiemetic treatments. Syndros is a newly approved liquid form of dronabinol, and it is used to treat the same conditions as marinol. Cesamet is a nabilone medication that targets the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in order to reduce proemetic signaling, and thereby reduce nausea and vomiting. There are still cannabinoid-derived medications going through clinical trials and awaiting FDA approval. 

While these medications may be able to offer some of the relief that cannabinoids are able to, they are unable to provide some of the benefits that can only be offered by natural and/or whole plant cannabis. To learn more about these medications, their contraindications, and where the FDA stands on medical marijuana, visit Medical Jane. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Randomized Controlled Trial Finds CBD may Reduce Pediatric Seizure Frequency by 50%

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital have found cannabidiol (CBD) may be an effective treatment of a rare and severe form of epilepsy. The study, which was randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled, involved 225 people with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome who received a CBD agent free of THC over the course of 14 weeks. Before enrolling in the study, participants had tried an average of 6 traditional anti-epileptic medications without success, and experienced an average of 85 weekly "drop seizures," which occur when the muscles become limp and cause an individual to fall. During the study, patients received either high doses of CBD (20 mg/kg), low doses of CBD (10 mg/kg), or placebo, of which 40% of high-dose patients and 36% of low-dose patients experienced 50% or greater reductions in drop seizures. High-dose patients experienced a decrease in drop seizures by 42%, on average, per week, and low-dose patients saw this decrease by an average of 37%. Those who received CBD were 2.6 times more likely to say their condition had improved than the patients who received placebo and experienced a 17% reduction.

Study author Dr. Anup Patel writes, “Our study found that cannabidiol shows great promise in that it may reduce seizures that are otherwise difficult to control.” Patel noted that those who received CBD were more likely to experience side effects like a decrease in appetite and sleepiness, but that these side effects were mostly well-tolerated.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

How Cannabinoids Translate Into Effects

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

The relief cannabis provides to patients is largely dependent on the cannabinoid and terpenoid composition of the cannabis strain involved. There are many different cannabinoids present in cannabis, of which the most common are THC and CBD. THC is a psychoactive cannabinoid that increases appetite, reduces pain, and promotes rest. CBD is a non-psychoactive compound that relieves anxiety and muscle spasticity, improves moods, and reduces inflammation. CBD also has the ability to buffer the psychoactive effects of THC, so that patients can reap the benefits of both cannabinoids without experiencing as much of a high feeling.

Other lesser known cannabinoids include CBN, which has sedative and anti-asthmatic effects and is beneficial for glaucoma, CBC which stimulates brain growth and acts as an anti-depressant, CBG which is a non-psychoactive antibiotic, THCv which promotes weight loss and provides anti-seizure benefits, and lastly Delta(8)THC, which is less psychoactive than the well-known Delta(9)THC and contains calming properties. Cannabinoids can work together in what is known as the entourage effect in order to provide relief for a myriad of symptoms. 

This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Ways CBD Affects Your Brain

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoids found in cannabis, but this does not mean that it does not have effects on the brain. CBD travels to the endocannabinoid system and, while it doesn't bind with the CB1 receptor itself, it interacts with it in ways to prevent other cannabinoids like THC from binding with it, and thereby prevents them from producing psychoactive effects. CBD also increases levels of anandamide, a naturally occurring endocannabinoid responsible for regulating other bodily chemicals, in the brain. Researchers recently used imaging scans to better understand which areas of the brain respond to CBD's anti-anxiety properties, and found the cannabinoid reduced blood flow to regions linked with anxiety, like the hypothalamus, and reduced overall anxiety scores in participants. CBD also acts as an antidepressant by balancing endocannabinoid dysfunction and influencing serotonin receptors. CBD also interacts with CB2 receptors to reduce pain. One study found CBD ointment helped reduce joint inflammation and spontaneous pain in arthritis patients.

Contrary to popular belief, chemicals in marijuana interact with the CB2 receptors to provide neuroprotective properties, as opposed to neuron damaging properties. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services even obtained a patent in 1999 claiming cannabis' chemical compounds help protect brain cells from neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and other forms of dementia. One study on animal models found CBD increased the number of viable brain cells and decreased the number of injured brain cells by more than 50% when it comes to brain injury. CBD is well known for its role in treating epilepsy. CBD produces anticonvulsant effects and protects brain cells by lowering the excitation of brain cells and minimizing excitotoxicity in epilepsy. CBD also supports the release of inhibitory neurotransmitters like GABA, thereby stopping the mechanism that directly contributes to seizures. Lastly, CBD has antipsychotic properties not unlike that of the antipsychotic drug amisulpride. In a study involving patients with schizophrenia, CBD produced similar effects to the pharmaceutical drug, and it was preferred by patients due its minimal side effects.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by out Chief Medical Officer.

Study: Cannabinoids Show Treatment Potential For Traumatic Brain Injury

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study conducted by Lesley D. Schurman and Aron H. Lichtman, which can be found in Frontiers in Pharmacology, suggests cannabinoids may have the power to benefit traumatic brain injury (TBI). Researchers reviewed preclinical studies that looked at the potential for cannabinoids to reduce the neural damage associated with TBI, and found cannabinoids interacted with the endocannabinoid system to regulate its immune response in order to prevent brain damage caused by a TBI. Following an injury, the body releases mediators like proinflammatory cytokines that can be harmful and lead to oxidative stress, inflammation, and excitoxicity, but this study suggests cannabinoids can modulate this response. The researchers conclude, “The [endocannabinoid] system, through release of its endogenous ligands or by changes in cannabinoid receptor constitutive activity possesses promise in the treatment of diverse TBI pathway.”

This study supports the findings of other studies that similarly suggest cannabinoids, like both THC and CBD, have neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties that improve the survival rates of brain cells following a TBI. Other research has shown when cannabinoids are administered right after injury, they prevent the release of harmful mediators that cause brain damage.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc, and you can find the text of Schurman and Lichtman's study here. This post has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana 101: Understanding the Parts of the Cannabis Plant

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

It is extremely important that medical marijuana patients understand the chemical makeup of their medical marijuana strains. Because the composition of therapeutic cannabinoids and terpenes vary from strain to strain, the efficacy of their symptom relief can vary widely as well. The cannabinoids THC is responsible for producing psychoactive effects. THC can also stimulate appetite and reduce nausea, making high-THC strains useful for HIV/AIDS and cancer patients. CBD, on the other hand, is a cannabinoid that can produce symptom relief without psychoactive side effects. CBD is thought to help in a wide range of conditions, including multiple sclerosis, PTSD, and epilepsy.  

Finding this information isn't necessarily easy. Many dispensaries still neglect to provide lab testing for their marijuana products, and when they do the testing can be inaccurate. Strains from one provider may have a different chemical makeup than strains of the same name from another provider, so without testing there is no way of knowing if it will have the same effect. We believe this information is necessary in ultimately finding the perfect dosing regimen. If you have access to this information, keep track of it in your journal so that you can easily look back and see what has been successful and what has not.

This information has been provided in part by the Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabinoid-based Vitamin Packets can Benefit Daily Wellness

Photo Credit: Axelle B/Public Domain

Photo Credit: Axelle B/Public Domain

New easy to drink vitamin packets now combine the health benefits of hem-derived cannabinoids, terpenes, and vitamins, to contribute to daily health and wellness. The vitamin packets, released by Dixie Brands under their Aceso line, were developed by a team of cannabinoid scientists with the intention of further developing the benefits of variations in cannabinoid synergies. The brands director of science, Jay Denniston, explains, "Current research indicates that whole-plant cannabinoids and the entourage effect will be the guiding principles of the next generation of quantitative and qualitative cannabis research." Another benefit to these dissolvable effervescent dietary supplements is that effervescent technologies such as these are able to breakdown larger molecules into smaller ones, making them easily digestible and allowing for 100 percent absorption. This makes effervescent technology not only more efficient but also easier on the digestive tract. 

While most research focuses on how cannabis effectively targets specific symptoms and illnesses, studies often overlook the all around health benefits that cannabis can offer on a daily basis. The research that does exist already shows the daily consumption of cannabis lowers BMI and contributes to bone health, and with more research we may find new ways daily cannabis can boost general wellness. This information has been provided in part by High Times Magazine and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

What You May or May Not Know About THC and CBD

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Photo Credit: Pixabay

THC and CBD are the most well known cannabinoids found in cannabis, and the cannabinoids share some similarities and differ from each other in quite a few ways.

Both THC and CBD have analgesic properties. In one study, patients who received THC reported lower levels of pain and improved sleep patterns as a result of their treatment. Another study found cannabis extracts with a 1:1 ratio of THC:CBD offered better pain relief than those with just THC. THC and CBD also manage nausea. One study found 14 of 20 cancer patients experienced less nausea when taking THC, while another study on rats discovered CBD could reduce chemotherapy nausea. The two also work better in a 1:1 ratio, and a third study found the administration of an extract with equal parts CBD and THC successfully decreased nausea in 5 of 7 patients suffering from chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. Both cannabinoids also have anti-inflammatory because they are able to prevent cytokines from causing inflammation. Lastly, studies are beginning to show both CBD and THC may slow tumor growth for certain types of cancer.

The cannabinoids don't always produce similar effects, though. Marijuana is often associated with the psychoactive high it can produce, but this effect is solely produced by THC. CBD not only doesn't produce this high, but researchers from the Netherlands have observed CBD actually counteracts the psychoactive effects of THC. When it comes to affecting mood, THC is interesting in that it has the ability to improve mood through euphoria and relaxation, but it can also produce anxiety and disorientation, making depression worse. Again, CBD might be able to counteract the memory loss and anxiety THC sometimes causes. CBD on its own also reduces feelings of anxiety and depression, and research has shown CBD reduces anxiety and stress in public speaking tests conducted among individuals with Generalized Social Anxiety disorder.

This information has been provided by HealthMJ and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.