Is More CBD Better? The Science Behind CBD Dosing for Anxiety and Other Conditions

Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Cannabidiol (CBD) is famed for its ability to fight epilepsy and buffer against the side effects of THC, among other things. So the question begs to be asked - is more CBD necessarily better? In short, no, and like most medications, the efficacy medical marijuana is dependent on a variety of factors including its dosage. This is known as the “inverted-U” effect, and it’s not uncommon among medications that, like CBD, affect multiple brain receptors. Of published toxicology articles, 37% report a degree of inverted-U responses, which reflects differential drug effects on the brain. CBD is applicable for a wide spectrum of treatments, including pain, anxiety, PTSD, and more, suggesting it has a plethora of brain and body targets.

At low doses, CBD can prevent endocannabinoids and phytocannabinoids from binding with receptors in the nervous system, which may be why it is effective at blocking some of the side effects produced by THC. Additionally, low to moderate doses of CBD are more effective at treating anxiety, as was suggested in one animal study from 1990 where CBD became less effective as an anti-anxiety medication as the dosage increased. These results were supported by human trials, in which low to moderate doses of CBD eased the stresses of social anxiety disorder and public speaking. CBD treats anxiety at about 25% of the amount required to treat epilepsy, showing CBD is effective at much higher doses for this condition.

This is why titrating CBD is essential in determining the perfect amount to experience symptom relief, and our app can help. Journaling daily on our app allows you to keep track of how you’re dosing so you can understand which aspects of your regimen are working, and which aspects of your regimen are not. This information has been provided in part by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This post does not represent an endorsement on behalf of Leafly for CannaBest Medical.

What Are The Best Marijuana Strains For Anxiety?

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Photo Credit: NicePik (https://bit.ly/2kp1Df4)

Treating anxiety with medical marijuana can be a complex process, and it comes down to the composition of a strain’s cannabinoids and terpenes that determine whether or not the plant will ease or exacerbate symptoms. While there isn’t a ton of research on medical marijuana for anxiety, the research that does exist has been positive. One study from 2017 found 40% of patients who used medical marijuana were able to ween off of their benzodiazepine anxiety medications.

Many suggest Indica strains, which tend to be more calming, are better at relieving anxiety symptoms, but to better understand which strains provide the best relief it is helpful to understand the precise cannabinoid and terpenoid makeup of the strain. When you understand the makeup of a strain, look for high-CBD strains for anxiety relief and avoid THC, which can actually produce feelings of anxiety and paranoia. CBD has been shown to counteract social anxiety disorder. Additionally, CBD can buffer against the side effects of THC, so that users can experience the relaxation and sedation that THC offers without experiencing the paranoia or anxiety it might induce. On the terpenoid end of the spectrum, researchers point to Myrcene as having the most powerful sedative anti-anxiety properties, but other terpenes that could help include linalool, beta-caryophyllene, and terpinolene.

When you begin to titrate your medical marijuana dosing regimen in the search for better relief, our app can guide the way. Document your regimen daily, and you’ll discover which changes are beneficial to your routine and which should be avoided. In turn, this information can be collected anonymously to help others determine a starting place in their own search for symptom relief. This information has been provided partially by Leaf Science. This post does not represent an endorsement on behalf of Leaf Science for CannaBest Medical.

What Are The Medical Benefits of CBD? - Part 1

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Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

As legalization proceeds and barriers to medical marijuana research are knocked down, we are becoming more aware of just how powerful wide-reaching medical marijuana is. One of the cannabinoids getting the most attention is cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive cannabinoid that can help a myriad of conditions. In this series, we will discuss some of the many conditions CBD can treat.

Numerous studies have suggested CBD can reduce anxious feelings in those with anxiety disorders, and that it can effectively treated a variety of anxiety disorders, including OCD, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, PTSD, and social anxiety disorder. Studies also suggest CBD could benefit those who suffer from depression. Animal studies have shown CBD acts on the serotonin pathways in the brain, allowing it to act as an antidepressant, and one study found CBD reduces anhedonia, which is a symptom of depression that prevents people from feeling joy or happiness. CBD can also stop nausea and vomiting. One study found CBD effectively helped treat nausea in patients who did not get relief from traditional treatments. CBD may also help those with diabetes, and animal studies have found the cannabinoid slows the progression of diabetes and diabetic inflammations, as well as benefit complications associated with diabetes. CBD may also protect against diabetes, and one study found CBD prevented at-risk mice from developing the condition.

Perhaps the most well-known success story for CBD is its ability to treat epilepsy. CBD has acted as an anticonvulsant in animal models, and GW Pharmaceuticals have been testing their CBD oil Epidiolex with success. In the study, 25 and 50 mg/kg a day lowered seizure frequency by half while producing few mild side effects. Additionally, a 2013 survey of parents of children with treatment-resistant epilepsy found 84% reported reduced seizure frequency with CBD use. Lastly, and contrary to previous beliefs, CBD may treat schizophrenia and mental illnesses related to psychosis. It has been found to be as effective as antipsychotics with fewer side effects, and scientists believe this could be attributed to the stimulation of anandamide production. One study found CBD helped with hallucinations, delusions, lack of emotion, and reduced social functioning. CBD can also benefit those with Parkinson’s disease, and various studies have found CBD can help treat the sleep disturbances and psychosis associated with the disorder without worsening motor symptoms and while improving overall quality of life.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. In tomorrow’s post, we will continue to discuss some of the conditions CBD is able to treat.

The Link Connecting Marijuana and Serotonin - Part 2

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Photo Credit: BrainsRusDC (https://bit.ly/3086XCG)

In our previous post we established the link between Marijuana and serotonin. Now, let’s see what this means in relation to its effects on the body. Researchers suspect the relationship between marijuana and serotonin is what makes it responsible for elevating mood, and benefiting anxiety and depression. Serotonin is an important regulator of mood, emotion, and stress, and when its levels are insufficient, it could cause mental health disorders like anxiety and depression.

One study from 2016 found a drug similar to CBD blocked enzymes that break down endocannabinoids in mice, which resulted in an antidepressant effect. When the mice received a chemical that blocks serotonin, these effects went away, suggesting CBD’s effects on mood may be linked to the serotonergic system. Back in 2006, when the cannabinoid receptor blocker rimonabant was introduced into the market to combat obesity, it was found that these blockers also unintentionally blocked serotonin, thereby causing depression and anxiety in those who took the medication. A study from 2015 also found genetically altered mice who did not have CB1 receptors in their serotonin neurons exhibited increased anxiety. Lastly, a 2011 study found heightened levels of natural cannabinoids increased the efficacy of antidepressants, and that blocking CB1 receptors prevented the antidepressants from working at all.

This concludes our posts on the relationship between serotonin and cannabis, and what this means for us. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

The Link Connecting Marijuana and Serotonin - Part 1

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Photo Credit: BrainsRusDC (https://bit.ly/3086XCG)

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter able to regulate various functions like mood, emotion, appetite, and sleep, and it is found within the brain, GI tract, and blood platelets. It may be closely linked to the endocannabinoid system, which may explain why cannabis is able to benefit those suffering from anxiety and depression. Studies have shown cannabinoids can increase the activity levels of serotonin neurons, and cannabis increases the release of serotonin. In 2007, one study found 20% of the serotonin neurons in mice contained cannabinoid receptors, and endocannabinoids like anandamide were found in areas of the brain where serotonin is usually found. Another study from 2004 found THC increased serotonin levels in mice. Additionally, when their CB1 receptors were blocked, serotonin levels decreased. CBD could also indirectly activate serotonin receptors, and researchers suspect many of CBD’s therapeutic effects, like its ability to benefit anxiety, depression, epilepsy, and provide neuroprotection, pain relief, and nausea relief, could be linked to its activation of a subtype of serotonin receptor.

So now that we know the different ways cannabis interacts with serotonin, what does this mean for its effects on the body? You’ll found out in our next post! This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of Marijuana? - Part 4.

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

After having discussed so many way marijuana can be applicable in medicinal instances, it’s time we conclude our discussion.

Many people may be aware of short spurts of anxiety following marijuana use, but what they don’t know is that marijuana could actually improve anxiety long-term. The non-psychoactive cannabinoid CBD, specifically, has been deemed as effective as approved anti-anxiety medications. Studies have found marijuana may manage the overactive immune system associated with lupus. This, as well as marijuana’s inherent anti-inflammatory properties, can help alleviate symptoms of pain and inflammation that coincide with the condition. Many patients have experienced relief from the pain and inflammation associated with arthritis, however these results have proven inconsistent in what studies exist, and while the medication is well tolerated, some patients did not experience any relief at all. More research is desired.

Cannabinoids also help stimulate bone formation, prevent bone resorption, and prevent loss of bone mass making marijuana a potentially powerful player in therapy for osteoporosis. By reducing the side effects associated with Hepatitis C treatment regimens, marijuana use encourages patients to complete their treatments and helps lead patients to remission. Its stimulation of certain receptors may also improve treatment outcomes. Marijuana may also help those who suffer from severe headaches like migraines by reducing their frequency and severity. Lastly, researchers have discovered lower prevalence of diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in marijuana users. Marijuana users, in general, have lower insulin levels, smaller waists, are less likely to be obese.

This concludes our post on the many ways marijuana can treat a myriad of symptoms. Thanks for following along for the discussion! This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Cannabis as an Anti-Anxiety Medication

Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

A new study published in Psychopharmacology has found regular cannabis use can, over time, reduce the risk of anxiety and blunt stress responses in stressful situations, including when a person is sober. In the study, which involved 40 regular cannabis users and 42 people who had little to no experience with cannabis, non-cannabis users reported feeling anxious and exhibited high levels of cortisol in stressful scenarios, while cannabis users reported less anxiety, and exhibited no change in cortisol levels. Prior to the study, all participants abstained from use for 12-18 hours. Results also found that patients did not exhibit heightened cannabis cravings when stressed.

Co-author, researcher, and clinical assistant professor at Washington State University explains, “Based on our findings, the potential effects of cannabis on stress do appear to extend beyond the period of intoxication… But we’re not yet comfortable saying whether that muted stress response is a good thing or a bad thing.” Both too much and too little cortisol can prove problematic, with too much resulting in negative side effects and leading to various conditions, and too little preventing a person from producing an appropriate stress response. More research is necessary in order to determine whether reduced cortisol levels are beneficial or detrimental.

Learn more about this study by reading this article on Leafly. This information has been reviewed and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Survey Finds Coloradans Use Marijuana For Sleep and Pain Relief, Not Partying

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

With the wave of legalization gaining popularity in various states across the nation, it is interesting to see the motivations behind marijuana use. In Colorado, where both recreational and medical marijuana are legal, it seems even the recreational users are using marijuana to self medicate, as opposed to using it for fun. The organization Consumer Research Around Cannabis surveyed over 1,200 marijuana users in Denver and it surroundings, and found 47.2% used cannabis as a sleep aid. Another 47.2% used it for pain relief. Falling closely behind, 45.7% used marijuana for anxiety and depression. Only 28.5% used marijuana for recreational fun, and 32.8% responded they used marijuana for expanding creativity and thought processes.

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

How Cannabidiol (CBD) Works for Treating Anxiety

Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Various animal studies and human experimental, clinical, and epidemiological studies suggest CBD has powerful anti-anxiety properties, and when administered acutely, it seems both safe and well-tolerated. This suggests the cannabinoid could be helpful for the treatment of panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), social phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and mild to moderate depression. Many pharmaceutical medications known as SSRIs work to target serotonin receptors to reduce anxiety and depression. Like SSRIs, CBD may be able to support signaling through serotonin receptors, and in one animal study, Spanish researchers found CBD enhanced 5-HT1A (a subtype of serotonin receptor) transmission ad affected serotonin faster than SSRIs.

Brain scans of those who suffer from depression or anxiety often show a smaller hippocampus, which is an area of the brain known for its role in memory formation and cognition. Treatments of depression are often associated with neurogenesis within the hippocampus. One animal study found consistent administration of CBD promoted neurogenesis in the hippocampus, suggesting it may help treat anxiety and depression. in a small double-blind study, Brazilian researchers found patients afflicted with generalized social anxiety reported significant decreases in anxiety after CBD consumption. These claims were validated through the support of brain scans that showed cerebral blood flow patters consistent with anti-anxiety effects. Another small study found patients with social anxiety disorders reported less anxiety while performing public speaking tests after the use of CBD. These findings were supported by indicators relating to heart rate and blood pressure.

This information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study Says CBD Alone Does Not Enhance Mood or Anxiety

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

A recent study published in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research has found CBD alone does not effect emotions or behavior in healthy test subjects, even when encountering emotional stimuli. The study, which involved 38 health adults, intended to investigate if CBD can enhance mood or counteract anxiety. These participants were then divided into three groups, in which they received 300 mg, 600 mg, or 900 mg or oral CBD followed by psychological tests intended to elicit positive or negative responses. Researchers reported no significant change in mood when subjected to negative emotional stimuli or social rejection, although the group that received 900 mg did experience a slight increase in heart rate. 

More research is desired into whether or not the presence of THC could influence these results, and if whole-plant cannabis could be a provide a preferable alternative treatment option for anxiety. This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Why Do People Use Cannabis? Survey Finds Relaxation, Stress and Anxiety Relief

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

There are many reasons someone may choose to incorporate cannabis into his or her daily routines, whether it be to relieve symptoms associated with specific conditions or whether it be to improve ones overall quality of life. A 2017 survey from Frontier Data and involving the majority of respondents (55%) used cannabis to relax. Another 40% used cannabis to help with stress or increase the enjoyment of social experiences. Thirty-nine percent of respondents also claimed to use cannabis to reduce anxiety. These responses are backed up by numerous studies and reports that have determined non-psychoactive cannabidiol (CBD) has anxiolytic effects. About 29% percent of respondents claimed to use cannabis as a sleep aid, while 26% used cannabis to manage pain, 16% used it to stimulate creativity, and 15% used it for a specific medical condition. 

Gender also played an interesting factor in the responses, and women were found to be more likely to use cannabis for popular medicinal benefits. Women were 16% more likely to cite using cannabis for anxiety, 10% more likely to use it for sleep, 7% more likely to use it as a stress reliever, 8% more likely to use it for pain management, and 8% more likely to use it to suppress nausea. This study was conducted in partnership with MassRoots, whose CEO Isaac Dietrich explained, “Over the past three years, we’ve built a community of over a million of the world’s most passionate cannabis consumers. In conjunction with New Frontier Data, we’re releasing the first cannabis consumer sentiment report, which will analyze the hundreds of millions of anonymized data points surrounding cannabis purchasing decisions.”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Marijuana and Anxiety: A Guide

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Marijuana may be able to help relieve anxiety and stress, but this relief is largely dependent on the cannabis strain's composition and on the individual's drug tolerance, pre-existing conditions, and other environmental factors. Cannabis may provide a safe and effective alternative to the pharmaceuticals traditionally used to treat anxiety, and now studies are beginning to backup the anecdotal claims to its efficacy. A study from Canada found that within 90 days of prescription medical cannabis use, 40% of patients treating anxiety and pain were able to stop their use of benzodiazebines. Another study from Vanderbilt University in 2014 found smoking marijuana increased the presence of endocannabinoids, which are naturally-occurring brain chemicals that can decrease as a result of chronic stress. Some researchers theorize reduced endocannabinoids could potentially cause anxiety disorders. Additionally, marijuana's role in memory extinction has led experts to believe it could be suitable in the treatment of PTSD. 

While cannabis may be able to help treat anxiety disorders, it has also been known to cause short-term anxiety and paranoia in some instances, especially when the individual is new to the plant or consumes large doses. Anxiety can also occur after abruptly stopping cannabis use. That said, studies have found only a small association between cannabis use and anxiety disorders, and some have deemed it only a "minor risk factor" in developing symptoms of anxiety. Many find THC helps anxiety for some, while it exacerbates its symptoms of others. CBD acts on serotonin receptors so that it can help regenerate brain cells that are lost or damaged due to chronic anxiety and depression. The ratio these two cannabinoids can determine whether cannabis helps or worsens symptoms, and strains that are higher in CBD are less likely to cause anxiety. In addition to cannabinoids, terpenes found in cannabis can also influence relief. Some terpenes that may help treat anxiety include Myrcene, Linalool, β-Caryophyllene, and Terpinolene.

When trying out cannabis for anxiety, knowing your optimal dose is crucial, and our app can help! Document your regimen daily in the journaling section of our app so that you can see which strain of cannabis and dosing amount provides the most effective relief. This information has been provided in part by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis Juicing

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

There are a wide range of vehicles available to medical marijuana patients, and each method offers its own unique benefits. One such method gaining in popularity among the medical marijuana community is cannabis juicing, which involves juicing the raw form of cannabis in order to extract its cannabinoids without experiencing any psychoactive effects. When consuming the raw form of cannabis, patients can access unique cannabinoids that disappear when the plant is heated, like THCA, CBDA, and CBG, which are known to help immune and cell function. Juicing cannabis only works with fresh leaves and flowers that have not been cured or age, and it can take days to weeks before its benefits can take effect.

It is believed cannabis juice may be able to treat depression, anxiety, dementia, stroke, insomnia, fatigue, cancer, pain, diabetes, and immune system disorders. It is also a powerful dietary supplement. Because cannabis juice is non-psychoactive, patients can ingest more of it without feeling unwanted side effects, and can therefore ingest higher amounts of cannabinoids and terpenes. Cannabis juice contains cannabinoids in their acidic forms, and while research is still lacking, what does exist suggests there may be a wide array of therapeutic benefits. THCA has shown promise in treating pain and inflammation, nausea and appetite loss, acting as an anti-proliferative against prostate cancer, and protecting against nerve degeneration. CBDA may also treat nausea and fight the growth of cancerous tumors. 

Cannabis juicing may not be for those diagnosed with kidney or gallbladder disorders, and it can interfere with certain medications. For more information about cannabis juice and for recipes or instructions, visit Leaf Science. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

For Weight Loss, Stick to THCV-potent Cannabis Strains

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Researchers have found the cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) can act as a dietary compound that suppresses appetite and provides energy. The cannabinoid also reduces insulin resistance, making it beneficial for patients who suffer from Diabetes. One study from 2013 coming from the University of Buckingham found oral doses of THCV, when given to groups of genetically obese and dietary-induced mice, improved insulin signaling and sensitivity.

THCV is non-psychoactive at small doses, and while it does stimulate the brain in similar ways to THC in high doses, the effects do not last long. Steep Hill, a cannabis science and technology firm, suggests THCV can aid in panic attacks, anxiety, and stress without affecting one's emotions, something that could be beneficial for patients with PTSD. Patients with Parkinson's disease may also benefit from THCV's effects on motor control. Scientists believe THCV may also stimulate bone growth, which could help those with osteoporosis. Lastly, like CBD, THCV produces anti-inflammatory effects. 

To learn more about this cannabinoid and where you can find THCV-potent strains, read the full article on MassRoots. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Marijuana Allows 45% of Pain and Anxiety Patients to Eliminate Use of Prescription Pill, Study Finds

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

A new observational study involving 146 patients and conducted by Canada's Canabo Medical Inc. has found medical cannabis causes a drop in reliance on benzodiazepine for anxiety and pain patients. In the study, 40% of patients who used medical cannabis for pain and/or anxiety eliminated the use of benzodiazepines within 90 days, and after a years time the number increased to 45%. The majority of patients, at 61.3%, were using benzodiazepines to treat pain conditions. Another 27.4% used the prescription to treat anxiety, and 11.3% used the medications to treat neurological conditions.

Lead researcher Dr. Neil Smith explains, “We wanted to take a close look at the likelihood of continued benzodiazepine usage after commencing medical cannabis treatments and, to be perfect honest, the results are extremely promising... When conducting this type of research, experts are typically encouraged by an efficacy rate in the neighborhood of 10 percent. To see 45 percent effectiveness demonstrates that the medical cannabis industry is at a real watershed moment.” This study is significant in that cannabis, which has a high safety profile and lacks risk of addiction, may be able to stand in for benzodiazepines, which produce dizziness, headaches, memory impairment, and have the potential for abuse. In 2013, 30% of prescription pill overdoses were related to benzodiazepines. Cannabis can be a safe and effective alternative treatment for pain and anxiety. 

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

New Report: CBD Is Good for Anxiety

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

Neuroscientist and researcher Carl Stevenson from the University of Nottingham recently reviewed existing marijuana-related research and found evidence suggesting cannabidiol (CBD) may be able to reduce anxiety. Live Science reported data compiled from human trials suggests CBD reduces fear, resulting in a reduction of anxiety, by changing brain activity. One reviewed study from 1993 that was published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology found subjects who received CBD were less anxious when subjected to social phobia. Another study from 2011 found CBD helped people who became anxious in public speaking situations. These reviews are based on the few studies that have been performed on humans, as opposed to most trials which have been conducted on animal models like rodents. 

This information has been provided by High Times Magazine and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

New Study Suggests CBD Could Help Treat Anxiety and Substance Abuse Disorder

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study coming from the University of Nottingham suggests CBD could play a therapeutic role against anxiety-related substance abuse disorders. The team of researchers led by behavioral neurologist Dr. Carl Stevenson looked at studies surrounding the impact of CBD on fear and drug memory processes, and found CBD effectively reduced the expression of fear and drug memories. These findings suggest CBD not only could interfere with fear recollection and help those suffering phobias and PTSD, but also prevent relapse in those recovering from substance abuse disorders.

Researchers write, “Converging lines of evidence have established that acute CBD treatment is anxiolytic in both animals and humans...A growing number of preclinical studies also indicate that this drug reduces fear memory expression when given acutely. Importantly, CBD produces an enduring reduction in learned fear expression when given in conjunction with fear memory reconsolidation or extinction by disrupting the former and facilitating the latter. This makes CBD a potential candidate for testing as a pharmacological adjunct to psychological therapies or behavioural interventions used in treating PTSD and phobias.” He adds, “Understanding how cannabidiol regulates emotion and emotional memory processing may eventually lead to its use as a treatment for anxiety-related and substance abuse disorders. The published literature makes CBD a potential candidate for testing as a pharmacological support to psychological therapies or behavioural interventions used in treating post-traumatic stress disorder and phobias,”

You can find the text of this study on the Online Wiley Library website. This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical officer. 

Conditions Medical Marijuana Could Help

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Medical cannabis is full of chemical compounds called cannabinoids and terpenes that interact with the body's endocannabinoid system. The different concentrations of compounds allow the plant to have a wide array of different effects, which make cannabis suitable for many different conditions and symptoms, or even combat the side effects of other treatment regimens. For cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, cannabis can alleviate side effects associated with the treatment like fatigue, nausea, pain, loss of appetite, and insomnia. Similarly, HIV/AIDS treatment regimens produce similar side effects that can be alleviated by medical cannabis. 

Patients who suffer from multiple sclerosis experience neurological problems and muscle spasms. Medical Cannabis can help alleviate these symptoms, which can allow patients to gain control over their muscles, regain bladder control, improve vision and mobility, and thereby improve their overall quality of life. Cannabis can help those with epilepsy by reducing the frequency of seizures and even, at times, eliminating them all together. Studies have found CBD is an effective treatment option even in those who suffer from forms that had previously proven treatment-resistant. Chronic pain accompanies a wide range of conditions, but research has found cannabis can be as effective as pharmaceutical options. This offers patients a safer alternative to dangerous pharmaceuticals like opioids. Lastly, some patients with depression or anxiety could benefit from the relaxing properties high-CBD strains of cannabis. 

This information has been brought to you by the Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

 

Some Conditions Medical Marijuana Can Help Treat

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

The Medicinal Marijuana Association has compiled a list of the top five symptoms patients seek to alleviate using medical marijuana therapy.

Medical marijuana is an analgesic, and it is most commonly prescribed to treat pain. This includes neuropathic pain, AIDS, and spinal cord injuries. In addition to treating pain, medical marijuana shown to be as effective as pharmaceutical pain killers, but with a much higher safety profile, so it is equally effective in treating and reducing addiction brought on by pain killers by allowing patients to ween off of and replace these medications. Because marijuana receptors in the brain are responsible for regulating anxiety and stress, medical marijuana (especially CBD-rich strains) can be beneficial for those who suffer anxiety disorders. Marijuana can also help those who suffer from fatigue, insomnia, restlessness, and pain fall asleep, stay asleep longer, and experience higher quality of sleep.  

Medical marijuana also helps lower levels of depression with fewer side effects than anti-depressants. The medication also helps treat nausea, which is especially effective for cancer and AIDS patients. By reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and inducing appetite, medical marijuana can fight cachexia and help patients to gain weight. This also makes medical marijuana effective for those diagnosed with Crohn's disease, which irritates the small intestine. Medical marijuana therapy can reduce pain and diarrhea while increasing appetite and weight gain. Medical marijuana is also effective in treating muscle spasms and stiffness typical of multiple sclerosis. This helps MS patients improve sleep, walking, and other daily activities that would otherwise interfere with quality of life. 

This information has been provided by Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

 

Medical Marijuana for Fatigue and Depression

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

The use of medical marijuana in the treatment of depression is controversial, but some studies do suggest the medication could be beneficial in its treatment and the treatment of its associated symptoms like fatigue, pain, stress, and anxiety. One study from the University of Buffalo suggests marijuana may be able to positively alter chronic stress, of which depression is linked to. Stress chips away at endocannabinoids in the brain, so it is suggested cannabis may be able to restore these chemical compounds in order to return to homeostasis and create a balanced mood. The study was originally conducted on animals, but the study's authors have since continued exploring these results for verification. 

The findings from another study from McGill University in 2007 creates a clear discovery of how marijuana mimics the effects of endocannabinoids, and how those endocannabinoids directly influence serotonin, which is a vital chemical in the fight against depression. The authors determined marijuana could benefit depression, as long as patients don't consume too high of a dose. 

This information has been provided by the Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.