What Is THCA Crystalline?

Photo Credit: ▒░ TORLEY ░▒▓ / Flickr (https://bit.ly/2lyRAE6)

Photo Credit: ▒░ TORLEY ░▒▓ / Flickr (https://bit.ly/2lyRAE6)

THCA is tetrahydrocannabinolic acid, the acidic form of THC, and it is usually found in raw and live cannabis before the plant is exposed to heat. Unlike THC, THCA is non-psychoactive, so it won’t produce the feelings of getting high. THCA crystalline is produced when THCA is isolated from the cannabis plant and broken down into a powder. THCA can help target an endocannabinoid deficiency, but to reap the benefits of THCA, you’ll have to juice or eat cannabis in its raw form. Some tout THCA for having strong anti-inflammatory effects, while others claim the cannabinoid can fight migraines, irritable bowel syndrome, and epilepsy. Unfortunately, research surrounding the cannabinoid is limited, and only one study has found the cannabinoid reduced nausea and vomiting in rats.

This information has been provided by High Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

THCA Shows Promise for Huntington’s Disease, Study Finds

Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

In a new study published in the British Journal of Pharmacology, researchers have found THCA reduced inflammation, served as a neuroprotectant, improved motor function, and prevented brain degeneration in animals. THCA is the acidic precursor to THC, and is found in cannabis that has not yet undergone the heating process decarboxylation. THCA has the a lot of the same beneficial properties offered by THC, but without any psychoactive side effects. One thing that distinguishes THCA from other cannabinoids is its ability to positively affect the PPARy brain receptor, which is responsible for lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis. This has led the study’s authors to believe THCA may serve “as a lead structure for the development of novel drugs for the management of (Huntington’s) and, possibly, other neurodegenerative and inflammatory diseases.” The authors find their study unique in that they are actively researching the acidic forms of cannabinoids, something that other studies often neglect. They explain most studies “have used neutral cannabinoids, especially THC and CBD… with little attention to the genuine phytocannabinoids of the plant, namely their acidic forms. We provide evidence that these compounds hold significant pharmacological potential.”

This information has been provided by Leafly and approve by our Chief Medical Officer.

Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA): The Raw Cannabinoid For Pain - Part 2

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

In our previous post, we briefly introduced the raw and acidic form of THC, known as tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA). In this post, we will continue our discussion by taking a closer look at all the cannabinoid has to offer. 

THCA may be able to reduce nausea and vomiting, and in a study published in the British Journal of Pharmacology, THCA reduced nausea and vomiting without intoxicating rodents and shrews who showed nausea behaviors and who received a substance that induced vomiting. Another study found THCA blocks the same enzymes that NSAIDS target from manufacturing pro-inflammatory compounds, suggesting the compound contains anti-inflammatory properties. Another study from 2012 found THCA reduced the progression of Parkinson's Disease in experimental models. In the experiment, THCA reduced damage to neurons from positively charged neurotoxins. 

A study from 2008 suggests THC and THCA both engaged the cell receptor TRPA1, a receptor that is currently under the gaze of many pain researchers for its role in inflammatory, neuropathic, and migraine pain. Lastly, according to research published in 2013, THCA may contain anti-cancer and anti-proliferative effects. The study involved laboratory models of prostate cancer, and although its effects were not as significant as the effects of CBD, there is still reason to investigate THCA further. 

This concludes our discussion of THCA. This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.  

 

Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA): The Raw Cannabinoid For Pain - Part 1

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

A majority of cannabis users and medical marijuana patients will heat their marijuana to activate its cannabinoids in a process called decarboxylation. What many don't know, however, is that some of marijuana's raw and unheated compounds can also produce therapeutic effects. One such compound is the acidic form and antecedent of THC, known as tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA). Unlike THC, it's raw and acidic form does not produce any psychoactive effects. It is safe and known for its ability to ease pain and sooth an upset stomach. While many pass by THCA, the compound has its own valuable therapeutic and nutritional attributes that should not be overlooked. 

So how can you get a good dose of THCA if you're not applying heat to cannabis for consumption? One method patients can take advantage of is cannabis juicing. Another is through the creation of raw cannabis oil, which are usually sold in an oral syringe or capsules and can be consumed like any dietary supplement. Patients can also create uncooked edibles, like salads or salad dressings. 

In our next post, we will take a deeper look at just what these valuable attributes are. This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.  

Cannabis Juicing

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

There are a wide range of vehicles available to medical marijuana patients, and each method offers its own unique benefits. One such method gaining in popularity among the medical marijuana community is cannabis juicing, which involves juicing the raw form of cannabis in order to extract its cannabinoids without experiencing any psychoactive effects. When consuming the raw form of cannabis, patients can access unique cannabinoids that disappear when the plant is heated, like THCA, CBDA, and CBG, which are known to help immune and cell function. Juicing cannabis only works with fresh leaves and flowers that have not been cured or age, and it can take days to weeks before its benefits can take effect.

It is believed cannabis juice may be able to treat depression, anxiety, dementia, stroke, insomnia, fatigue, cancer, pain, diabetes, and immune system disorders. It is also a powerful dietary supplement. Because cannabis juice is non-psychoactive, patients can ingest more of it without feeling unwanted side effects, and can therefore ingest higher amounts of cannabinoids and terpenes. Cannabis juice contains cannabinoids in their acidic forms, and while research is still lacking, what does exist suggests there may be a wide array of therapeutic benefits. THCA has shown promise in treating pain and inflammation, nausea and appetite loss, acting as an anti-proliferative against prostate cancer, and protecting against nerve degeneration. CBDA may also treat nausea and fight the growth of cancerous tumors. 

Cannabis juicing may not be for those diagnosed with kidney or gallbladder disorders, and it can interfere with certain medications. For more information about cannabis juice and for recipes or instructions, visit Leaf Science. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

What is THCA (Tetrahydrocannabinolic Acid)?

Photo Credit: Kojin/Shutterstock

Photo Credit: Kojin/Shutterstock

Tetrahydrocannabinolic Acid (THCA) is the molecular precursor to THC. THCA is non-psychoactive, and must be converted to THC through a heated process called decarboxylation before it will provide any sort of "high." This is because while THCA contains a carboxylic acid group that is absent in THC, which actually prevents it from binding with the CB1 receptor in the brain. In order to consume THCA, a patient must avoid the use of heat in order to prevent THCA from converting into THC. Common THCA vehicles include topicals, juices, and tinctures. Patients can apply THCA topicals in the form of lotions, oils, and salves, directly to a targeted area so that it can provide localized pain and inflammation relief. THCA can be used in a pure crystalline form, which can be measured out into capsules for easy dosing. Patients may choose to juice cannabis or use tinctures under the tongue to consume THCA as well. Because THCA does not bind with cannabinoid receptors, it is slightly unclear how it is able to provide relief. Still, the cannabinoid is known to provide relief for a variety of symptoms.

THCA regulates immune cell function to reduce inflammation by lowering the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Because TNFα plays a role in inflammation and fever, lowering its production could reduce these symptoms, while also reducing pain, muscle spasms, menstrual cramping, and treating immune system disorders. THCA also produces anti-emetic effects, and researchers have found it reduces nausea and vomiting in animal models. THCA may also have the potential to slow tumor growth in different tumor cell types, but these anti-cancer effects are not as significant as the ones provided by other cannabinoids like CBD. Lastly, THCA acts as a neuroprotective agent. One study on brain cell cultures that had been exposed to the toxic chemical MPP found THCA protected the brain cells from toxicity. THCA increased the number of living cells after their exposure to MPP by 123%, compared to CBD which also showed protection at around 117%. This may have implications for neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.