Study Determines CBD is Effective as Adjunctive Therapy for Psychosis

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Clinical trial data published in The American Journal of Psychiatry suggests patients who suffer from schizophrenia could manage their psychotic symptoms better through the addition of CBD therapy on a daily basis. In the randomized trial, British researchers compared the addition of 1000 mg of CBD to the addition of placebo in 88 patients’ conventional therapy regimens over the course of six weeks. At the end of the trial, researchers say those who received CBD “had lower levels of positive psychotic symptoms and were more likely to have been rated as improved and as not severely unwell by the treating clinician.” CBD also improved cognitive performance and overall functioning in patients, but these results were not significant statistically. Authors conclude, “These findings suggest that CBD has beneficial effects in patients with schizophrenia… As CBD’s effects do not appear to depend on dopamine receptor antagonism, this agent may represent a new class of treatment for the disorder.”

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of CBD? - Part 1

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

As legalization proceeds and barriers to medical marijuana research are knocked down, we are becoming more aware of just how powerful wide-reaching medical marijuana is. One of the cannabinoids getting the most attention is cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive cannabinoid that can help a myriad of conditions. In this series, we will discuss some of the many conditions CBD can treat.

Numerous studies have suggested CBD can reduce anxious feelings in those with anxiety disorders, and that it can effectively treated a variety of anxiety disorders, including OCD, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, PTSD, and social anxiety disorder. Studies also suggest CBD could benefit those who suffer from depression. Animal studies have shown CBD acts on the serotonin pathways in the brain, allowing it to act as an antidepressant, and one study found CBD reduces anhedonia, which is a symptom of depression that prevents people from feeling joy or happiness. CBD can also stop nausea and vomiting. One study found CBD effectively helped treat nausea in patients who did not get relief from traditional treatments. CBD may also help those with diabetes, and animal studies have found the cannabinoid slows the progression of diabetes and diabetic inflammations, as well as benefit complications associated with diabetes. CBD may also protect against diabetes, and one study found CBD prevented at-risk mice from developing the condition.

Perhaps the most well-known success story for CBD is its ability to treat epilepsy. CBD has acted as an anticonvulsant in animal models, and GW Pharmaceuticals have been testing their CBD oil Epidiolex with success. In the study, 25 and 50 mg/kg a day lowered seizure frequency by half while producing few mild side effects. Additionally, a 2013 survey of parents of children with treatment-resistant epilepsy found 84% reported reduced seizure frequency with CBD use. Lastly, and contrary to previous beliefs, CBD may treat schizophrenia and mental illnesses related to psychosis. It has been found to be as effective as antipsychotics with fewer side effects, and scientists believe this could be attributed to the stimulation of anandamide production. One study found CBD helped with hallucinations, delusions, lack of emotion, and reduced social functioning. CBD can also benefit those with Parkinson’s disease, and various studies have found CBD can help treat the sleep disturbances and psychosis associated with the disorder without worsening motor symptoms and while improving overall quality of life.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. In tomorrow’s post, we will continue to discuss some of the conditions CBD is able to treat.

Study: CBD Effective As Adjunctive Therapy For Psychosis

Photo Credit: NORML

Photo Credit: NORML

Contrary to the notion that those who use cannabis may develop psychosis, its cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) may actually help treat psychosis instead. According to a new study published in The American Journal of Psychiatry, the daily use of CBD as an adjunctive therapy can help those who experience psychotic symptoms as a result of schizophrenia. The six-week randomized trial assessed the adjunctive use of 1000mg plant-derived CBD or placebo in 88 patients with schizophrenia daily. Those who received CBD had lower levels of psychotic symptoms and were more likely to have their clinicians report an improvement in wellness at the end of the trial. CBD also produced minor improvements in cognitive performance and overall functioning. Authors concluded, “These findings suggest that CBD has beneficial effects in patients with schizophrenia… As CBD’s effects do not appear to depend on dopamine receptor antagonism, this agent may represent a new class of treatment for the disorder.”

This information has been provided by NORML and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of Marijuana? - Part 1.

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Medical marijuana is now being touted for having a wide range of medicinal benefits that allow it to provide therapeutic relief for many different conditions. In this four part series, we will take an in depth look at many of the medical conditions it is capable of treating.

One of the most commonly cited and widely approved conditions for marijuana use is chronic pain. Marijuana is known for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, making it effective in reducing pain and providing relief for the conditions that cause it, like arthritis, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and migraines. Medical marijuana is also used for treating glaucoma, a condition that affects sight and can damage the optic nerve due to increased pressure in the eye. Studies have found marijuana decreases intraocular eye pressure by 25-30%, and scientists believe its neuroprotective properties could prevent the optic nerve from getting damaged. Medical marijuana may also help those suffering from liver disease. The cannabinoid CBD can prevent liver fibrosis, while THC may be able to help improve the symptoms associated with cholestatic liver disease.

Marijuana is also promoted as a hero for cancer patients, mainly for its ability to reduce the nausea and vomiting accompanying chemotherapy treatments. Even more exciting, in rodent models, THC and cannabinoids have been found to induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting healthy cells. In other rodent models, THC reduced tumor size. Contrary to what has long been claimed by prohibitionists about cannabis’ relationship to schizophrenia, studies have found non-psychoactive compounds like CBD may actually benefit psychosis. CBD is antipsychotic and generally well tolerated. But be careful, as THC may actually exacerbate symptoms. Lastly, recent clinical trials have found medical marijuana help those with multiple sclerosis by combatting muscle spasticity, reducing pain, and improving sleep quality.

That concludes today’s post on the medical benefits of medical marijuana, but there’s still so much more to discuss! Tune into the following post where we will look at more conditions where medical marijuana’s usage is applicable. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study: Marijuana Does Not Lead to an Increase in Psychotic Symptoms

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Even as medical marijuana gains momentum as a safe an effective treatment option for a variety of symptoms, negative connotations concerning cannabis continue to exist. These connotations can produce negative stigmas and lead to fears about the outcomes of marijuana use. One such fear is that marijuana may contribute to an increase in psychotic symptoms and episodes, but now a study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health states there is "minimal evidence" of any association between cannabis use alone and the onset of psychotic symptoms in young people.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania Department of Psychiatry looked through a cohort of 4,171 people between the ages of 14 and 21 in order to determine if there exists a relationship between drug use and the onset of psychotic symptoms. After adjusting for potential confounders, researchers determined, "neither frequent nor early cannabis use predicted increased odds of psychosis spectrum classification... Overall, we found minimal evidence for associations between cannabis use by itself and psychosis spectrum symptoms.”

These findings are similar to those of previous studies assessing cannabis use and psychosis. This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Terpene Series: Linalool

Photo Credit: The Leaf Online

Photo Credit: The Leaf Online

Linalool smells of flowers, especially lavender, and serves as a sleep aid, boosts the immune system, reduces lung inflammation, and provides calming and relaxing relief. The terpene also buffers anxious emotions provoked by THC, making it a potential treatment in psychosis and anxiety. It also restores cognitive and emotional function, which suggests it may be useful in treating Alzheimer's disease.

One study found linalool reduces lung inflammation by blocking carcinogenesis from tobacco inhalation. Cannabis strains high in linalool may also reduce the harm caused by inhaling cannabis smoke as well. Linalool activates immune cells through receptors and pathways, thereby boosting the immune system as well. Another study found linalool reverses the histopathalogical hallmarks of Alzheimer's, and that it could restore cognitive and emotional functions through its anti-inflammatory benefits.

This information has been provided by Medical Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Marijuana Use Not Likely To Cause Psychosis

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Many patients desire the benefits of medical marijuana, but they hesitate to use it due to the negative stereotypes and stigmas that surround the plant. In the past, marijuana received a bad reputation, and was blamed for producing negative side effects, leading to bad habits or addictions, or causing mental illnesses and health problems. One theory suggested marijuana led to the development of psychosis, but now, research published in the journal Current Psychiatry Reports suggests it is unlikely that the use of marijuana contributes to the development of psychosis disorder.

The researchers from the University of Wyoming and Columbia University in New York analyzed recent studies surrounding the use of cannabis and psychotic behaviors, and reported cannabis use does not cause psychosis. Instead, the researchers found that subjects who are particularly susceptible to the disorder are more likely to engage in the early-onset of the use of cannabis. The researchers reported, " Evidence reviewed here suggests that cannabis does not in itself cause a psychosis disorder... Rather, the evidence leads us to conclude that both early use and heavy use of cannabis are more likely in individuals with a vulnerability to psychosis." 

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.