Marijuana And Sleep - Part 1.

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Marijuana is beginning to gain notoriety as a sleep aid, helping those who struggle with sleep apnea and insomnia, and those who suffer from conditions like chronic pain and PTSD that are known to cause sleep disturbances. Even in healthy users, one 2013 study found volunteers who used marijuana had less difficulty falling asleep and it took a shorter amount of time to fall asleep. Another study from 1973 found THC reduced the amount of time insomniacs needed to fall asleep by over an hour. That said, proper dosing is important as too high of a dose could actually exacerbate symptoms. THC also could help those with sleep apnea by calming and stabilizing breathing. One study from 2013 found synthetic THC worked in a dose-dependent to improve breathing throughout the night in those who suffered from sleep apnea. THC was also found to help those who suffer from PTSD-related nightmares, and one study from 2009 found patients with PTSD slept longer, experienced higher quality sleep, and did not experience as many daytime flash backs the following day after synthetic THC administration. Lastly, chronic pain users attest to marijuana’s ability to improve their quality of sleep.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. In the following post, we will continue our discussion by looking into the specifics on how marijuana is able to affect sleep.

PTSD, Insomnia, and Cannabis: What’s the Evidence Say?

Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Many of those who suffer from PTSD may suffer from insomnia as a result of the disorder, and it is said that psychotherapy medications and sleep aids are commonly prescribed to treat PTSD-related insomnia. However, these treatment regimens can produce a wide range of negative side effects. Now, research suggests medical cannabis may be able to provide relief for sleep-related issues without producing the unwanted side effects. According to a study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institute of Health (NIH), and the pharmaceutical company Sanofi-Aventis, consuming THC helped subjects to fall asleep easily and quickly.

Another study headed by Dr. Kenneth Cousens from the Napa State Hospital, California, and Dr. Alberto DiMascio, Director of Psychopharmacology at the Department of Mental Health, Boston State Hospital, suggests medical marijuana not only helps people fall asleep quicker, but that their quality of sleep is better and they are able to stay asleep longer. In addition to research, there is plenty of anecdotal evidence suggesting medical cannabis is much more preferable to the various combinations of medications that the VA currently relies on to treat the problems associated with PTSD.

This information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Why Cannabis Relieves PTSD Symptoms

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder resulting from traumatic experiences. Currently, PTSD patients are prescribed psychiatric medications that can produce negative side effects, but cannabis may be able to help. Neuroimaging studies have suggested the endocannabinoid system plays a key role in managing the central neurobiological pathways, which contributes to the dysregulation of threat-related processing responses to previous traumatic exposure. The endocannabinoid system also plays an important role in the function of the prefrontal cortex, making it key in information processing, subcortical arousal, and the regulation of cholinergic inputs. It may also disrupt conditioned fear and facilitate adaptation to aversive situations. Additionally, the ECS' ability to modulate hippocampal memory and plasticity may be the most important reason for cannabis' ability to treat PTSD. 

When cannabinoids receptors are activated in the prefrontal complex, they could augment serotonergic neurotransmission and elicit antidepressant effects. Researchers believe activation of the CB1 receptor may prevent the alteration of G-proteins in the prefrontal cortex, which in return may reduce suicidal thoughts and behaviors. One study involving patients in New Mexico's Medical Cannabis Program for PTSD found medical cannabis' antidepressant properties reduced the frequency and severity of suicidal behaviors in most participants, and in some cases, it led to the complete cessation of these behaviors. Cannabis may also help PTSD patients manage symptoms and prevent the relapse of symptoms by contributing to the disruption of aversive memories, anxiety, and improving stress-coping behaviors and reactivity to threat signals. 

Research correlates lower levels of anandamide with the occurrence of PTSD, and PTSD has been attributed to a deficiency in endocannabinoids, which regulate mood perceptions, flashback memories, behaviors, metabolism, and digestion. When cannabis activates these cannabinoids receptors, it helps to alleviate PTSD symptoms. One Brazilian study found THC is more potent than CBD in attenuating fear memories, and a combination may relieve symptoms with minimal and tolerable side effects. Other research has found CBD can treat neuropsychiatric disorders by interacting with serotonergic receptors and dopaminergic systems. One induced-fear test in animal models found CBD-treated laboratory animals exhibited less stress when nearing an electric maze in which they had previously been exposed to painful sensations. Lastly, one study found THC's binding to CB1 receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex resulted in memory reactivation and retrieval, but that CBD wa able to counter this as well as other psychotropic effects, leading to an effective way to manage PTSD symptoms. Even sub-effective doses of the two cannabinoids mitigated dysfunctional aversive and fear memories, locomotor activity, and anxiety-related behaviors. 

This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Marijuana and Your Memory

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Those who discourage marijuana use argue it impairs your memory, but how bad are marijuana's effects on memory? When cannabinoids like THC enter the bloodstream and continue on to the brain, they interact with the endocannabinoid system which can indeed alter memory function. THC interacts with CB1 receptors, which can be found in the hippocampus, an area of the brain responsible for processing and storing memories. Marijuana use makes it difficult to form new long-term memories, but it does not impair the ability to recall already existing memories. Long term users also perform worse on tests of working and verbal memory. Research is still unclear on whether these effects are permanent or if they can resolve over time when abstaining from use. 

While memory impairment is generally seen as negative, this isn't always the case. For example, those who suffer from PTSD may have negative memories that produce anxiety, hypervigilance, panic, and distress. Because of this, they could benefit from the endocannabinoid's ability to extinguish these memories, something that can be facilitated by marijuana use. 

The relationship between marijuana and memory is complex, and there is still so much to be understood about how different factors, like the cannabinoid composition, dosage, and one's genetic makeup or tolerance, can influence this relationship. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical officer. 

For Weight Loss, Stick to THCV-potent Cannabis Strains

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Researchers have found the cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) can act as a dietary compound that suppresses appetite and provides energy. The cannabinoid also reduces insulin resistance, making it beneficial for patients who suffer from Diabetes. One study from 2013 coming from the University of Buckingham found oral doses of THCV, when given to groups of genetically obese and dietary-induced mice, improved insulin signaling and sensitivity.

THCV is non-psychoactive at small doses, and while it does stimulate the brain in similar ways to THC in high doses, the effects do not last long. Steep Hill, a cannabis science and technology firm, suggests THCV can aid in panic attacks, anxiety, and stress without affecting one's emotions, something that could be beneficial for patients with PTSD. Patients with Parkinson's disease may also benefit from THCV's effects on motor control. Scientists believe THCV may also stimulate bone growth, which could help those with osteoporosis. Lastly, like CBD, THCV produces anti-inflammatory effects. 

To learn more about this cannabinoid and where you can find THCV-potent strains, read the full article on MassRoots. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis Treatments for PTSD in Non-veterans

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Of the studies involving cannabis and PTSD, most focus on PTSD associated with military veterans affected by combat-related stress and anxiety, but cannabis can also be effective in treating PTSD stemming from other traumas as well. A Brown University study suggests ordinary citizens with PTSD garner less attention, care, and treatment from medical institutions in comparison to military groups suffering the same symptoms, but this might be because developing long-term problems during the progression of the condition can be more difficult to treat. Authors of the study state, "A major finding of the authors’ search for nonmilitary service providers is that there is no centralized listing of PTSD providers, treatment programs, and support programs at the state or local level and limited listings at the federal level."

Access to cannabis could be helpful for these patients suffering PTSD because it is capable in treating the four types of PTSD symptoms that classify the condition, which includes intrusion, avoidance, negative alterations in cognition and mood, and alterations in arousal and reactivity. The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) released a report detailing the link between endocannabinoid deficiency and PTSD. Cannabis can fill the void of insufficient endocannabinoids within the body, which results in relief from painful memories and supports coping mechanisms. Researchers have found equal parts THC and CBD are effective in treating self-esteem issues stemming from PTSD, and smoking or vaping is reported as preferable for immediate relief from PTSD symptoms.

This information is provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Benefits of Medical Marijuana

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

As more states implement medical marijuana laws, and researchers become more interested in understanding the benefits of the medication, we are becoming learning more about the mysteries behind this plant and how it is able to target such a wide range of conditions and symptoms. Many conditions are accompanied by unbearable chronic pain, but now research has shown cannabis is not only an analgesic that provides effective pain relief, but that it does so without the risk of addiction or adverse side effects like its pharmaceutical counterparts. Physicians may prescribe medical marijuana for chronic muscle spasms, neuropathic pain, cancer-associated discomfort, and other pain issues.

Cancer and HIV patients often suffer from nausea and a decreased appetite, which prevents them from receiving the nutrition they need to aid recovery. Medical marijuana, however, has been shown to increase appetite and manage nausea. One of the specific cannabinoids in marijuana, CBD, reduces seizures in severe and treatment-resistant forms of epilepsy. Cannabis might also extend its benefits beyond physical health to mental health in the relief of psychiatric disorders and mental illness. Not only might it relieve anxiety and depression, but studies have found it could also help those who suffer from PTSD by alleviating feelings of fear or panic.

This information has been provided by the Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study: CBD Might Treat PTSD and Specific Phobias

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study led by Chenchen Song at the University of Birmingham and published by Frontiers in Pharmacology found CBD provides both acute and long-term effects to reduce fear memory, something that could be beneficial for treating PTSD and certain phobias. Using an animal model, researches injected rats with 10mg CBD and found it reduced freeze behavior of rats that had been expose to strong fear conditioning. This freeze response is the common reaction to fear when near prey animals, but rats were less likely to be fearful under the same conditions at a later date when they had been given CBD. In comparison, some rats were given MK-801, a N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor agonist which impairs the extinction of fear, and other rats were given D-cycloserine, a partial agonist which neither increase or decreases freezing.

The study also found that while CBD reduced freezing significantly for rats who had undergone strong fear conditioning, it actually impaired fear extinction in rats that had only undergone weak fear conditioning. Discussion of the research reads, “In the more translationally-relevant stronger conditioning setting, CBD both acutely inhibited fear expression and enhanced extinction to produce longer lasting reductions in fear... These observations provide further support for the potential translational use of CBD in conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder and specific phobias.”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. Read the study here.

Can Cannabis Benefit PTSD?

Photo Credit: Getty

Photo Credit: Getty

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that results from some sort of traumatic event. Those who suffer PTSD may experience hyperarousal with insomnia, isolation, flashbacks, avoidance, and anxiety. They also exhibit dissociative behaviors or arousal, and/or emotional or dysphoric symptoms. Because the endocannabinoid system plays a role in regulating neurobiological pathways, it is thought that targeting its receptors may benefit those who suffer from PTSD. Additionally, activating the cannabinoid receptors in the prefrontal complex could elicit antidepressant effects. Because the cannabinoids in medical marijuana are able to activate the cannabinoid receptors in the endocannnabinoid system, it is able to provide antidepressant effects which would make the medication useful for mood disorders, suicidal behaviors, and PTSD. A report from New Mexico's Medical Cannabis Program for PTSD found patients experienced reduced frequency, severity of, and even complete cessation of suicidal behaviors.

When the body suffers endocannabinoid deficiency and impaired CB1 signaling, the body has a more difficult time managing fear extinction and forgetting negative memories, making it more prone to anxiety and triggering flashbacks. Cannabis' phytocannabinoids can replenish endocannabinoid deficiency. A Brazilian study found THC can attenuate fear memories, and that a combination of THC and CBD could relieve PTSD symptoms with very minimal side effects. Another pre-clinical study found cannabis influences the nucleus accumbens VTA circuit of the mesolimbic system, which allows it to exhibit positive neuronal and behavioral effects and prevent negative associative memories from forming. An experimental animal study exposed mice to an electric maze, and then found mice treated with CBD were less likely to experience fear and exhibited less stress when nearing this maze. 

This information has been provided by Marijuana Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

New Study Suggests Marijuana May Benefit Mental Health

Photo Credit: Flickr @ Jordan Greentree

Photo Credit: Flickr @ Jordan Greentree

In a recent report published in the journal Clinical Psychology Review, researchers have found cannabis may be able to help those who suffer from depression, social anxiety, and PTSD. That being said, they did not find it beneficial for those who suffer from bipolar disorder. The study looked through 60 different studies to see if cannabis could be useful as a therapy in relation to mental health, especially on adult psychopathology and assessment. Of those studies, 31 articles discusses cannabis for therapeutic purposes and mental health, and 29 articles that discussed mental health and cannabis but not for therapeutic purposes. 

Author of the study, and associate professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia, says, "This is a substance that has potential use for mental health... We should be looking at it in the same way [as other drugs] and be holding it up to the same standard.” The author also noted its potential in combatting the opioid epidemic, and in turn benefiting public health. 

This information has been brought to you by Marijuana Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Sexual assault and PTSD: Marijuana may help

Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Airman 1st Class Corey Hook - http://bit.ly/2qwa6yc

Photo Credit: U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Airman 1st Class Corey Hook - http://bit.ly/2qwa6yc

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a common anxiety disorder that develops as a response to a trauma, whether that be a trauma from combat, sexual assault, or another traumatic event in one's life. General symptoms include flashbacks, nightmares, insomnia, hyper-arousal, fearfulness, anxiety, and anger. When it comes to PTSD for women, the most common cause according to the National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is sexual assault, with 94% or assault survivors suffering symptoms within two weeks of the event. 

Symptoms of PTSD often occur in response to a stimulus or trigger that cause the sufferer to recall his or her traumatic event. Some patients suggest inhaling cannabis vapors in anticipation of encountering a trigger, as this may desensitize the sufferer to the trigger over time. Additionally, marijuana has been known to help induce sleep and enhance quality of sleep. This makes it a potential treatment option for PTSD sufferers who have trouble sleeping or encounter nightmares.

This information has been provided by Health MJ and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.  

10 Little-Known Uses for CBD - Pt. 2w

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

Today, we will continue our discussion of the lesser-known uses of CBD. 

Evidence is continuing to mount about the medicinal benefits of CBD for Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). CBD's anti-anxiety, antipsychotic, and anti-inflammatory effects can produce a calming effect, which helps provide a stable mental environment for those who suffer from PTSD and allows them to overcome anxiety and stress. A German study from 2012 and published in the journal Translational Psychiatry compared the antipsychotic Amisulpride and CBD in 45 patients who suffered from schizophrenia, and found that while both treatments were effective, the fewer side effects of CBD made it preferable to the pharmaceutical medication. 

CBD could also benefit bowel diseases, and research shows cannabis' anti-inflammatory properties, along with CBD and THC's ability to control gut function in the body, offers relief for Crohn's disease patients. Using animal models and cell cultures, scientists from the Cajal Institute found CBD reversed inflammatory responses and provided protection from multiple sclerosis (MS). Within 10 days of beginning CBD treatment, mice had superior motor skills and showed improvements in their condition. Lastly, CBD provides a non-habit forming sleep aide that can help those who suffer from insomnia.

This concludes our post about CBD's little-known uses. This information has been provided by High Times Magazine and approved by our Chief medical officer. 

The Evidence Behind Marijuana and PTSD

Photo Credit: opensourceway/Flickr)

Photo Credit: opensourceway/Flickr)

One recent study from the University of Haifa, Israel, found cannabinoids prevented the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in rats. Those who suffer from PTSD experience their symptoms upon encountering common triggers, or trauma reminders, whatever they may be. PTSD is generally treated after the symptoms appear, but this research team, led by Dr. Irit Akirav from the Department of Psychology, found that dosing rats with cannabinoids after the traumatic event made them immune to future triggers. Rats treated with cannabis showed no symptoms of PTSD, while those who ere not treated experienced impairments in memory extinctions, altered pain sensation, and increased panicking. The researchers suggested cannabinoids were able to do so by rewiring circuits in the brain associated with the traumatic event. 

The research team hopes this rodent trial paves the way for future trials on humans studying the effects of cannabis on PTSD. Dr. Irit Akirav said, “The importance of this study is that it contributes to the understanding of the brain basis of the positive effect cannabis has on PTSD, and thus supports the necessity to perform human trials to examine potential ways to prevent the development of PTSD and anxiety disorders in response to a traumatic event.”

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

How Does Cannabis Help PTSD?

Photo Credit: High Times

Photo Credit: High Times

New research coming out of Ontario, Canada, has provided new insights surrounding how medical cannabis is used to treat PTSD. Psychiatrists and neuroscientists have found CBD interacts with serotonin in the brain, allowing it to disrupt the formation of negative associative memories. The animal trial measured how well rats associated pain with a specific odor. CBD was administered directly to rats during painful sensation which in turn prevented them from associating pain with smell. The rats who did not receive CBD became afraid of an electric shock whenever they smelled the odor. 

Other studies have found THC, or a combination of THC and CBD, could also be powerful agents in disrupting contextual fear memory reconsolidation, all with minimal psychological side effects. Additionally, some studies have found those with PTSD have an imbalance in their endocannabinoid system, which may account for why cannabis is so effective in this treatment. 

This information has been adapted from High Times Magazine and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

MMJ for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental condition involving uncontrollable anxiety and flashbacks that develop after experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event. PTSD patients may experience nightmares, stress, feelings of threat or danger, numbness, feeling tense, feeling guilty, losing interest in former enjoyable activities, becoming easily startled, sleep issues, angry outbursts, a fear of trigger places or events, and uncontrollable thoughts about the traumatic event. Currently, PTSD patients are prescribed various medications, mainly antidepressants, but these medications can have many horrible side effects on their own. Studies suggest marijuana can lessen the emotional impact of these events and can reduce anxiety and fear and improve sleep without the negative side effects. 

Both THC and CBD interact with the endocannabinoid system, which is responsible for maintaining emotional homeostasis and regulating memory consolidation, retrieval, and extension. By activating the cannabinoid receptors, cannabis modulates the release of neurotransmitters which can increase pleasure and the alternation of memory processes. They block the retrieval of the traumatic event which enhances its extension and reduces anxiety. Cannabis can help combat the three core symptoms of PTSD, and as measured by the Clinical Administered Post-traumatic scale, 75% of PTSD patients saw a reduction in PTSD symptoms when they were using cannabis. Preclinical evidence also suggests CBD could effectively treat PTSD when administered acutely as symptoms develop as opposed to chronically. Lastly, cannabis has the potential to dampen the emotional impact of traumatic memories over time, and when used shortly after experiencing or witnessing the traumatic event, PTSD-like symptoms are less likely to develop.

This information has been brought to you by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Understanding Cannabidiol (CBD) - Part 4

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

We will continue our discussion of conditions that can benefit from the use of CBD.

CBD can treat multiple sclerosis (MS) by reducing inflammation, providing neuroprotection and limiting the diseases progression. It also reduces MS symptoms like spasticity and neuropathic pain. Cannabis can fight obesity, and CBD specifically decreases body weight gain and reduces lipid levels. Because of CBD's neuroprotective properties, it supports the health of neural cells mitochondria and prevents neurodegeneration. In this way, CBD treatments improved well being and quality of life scores for those who suffer from Parkinson's disease. CBD might help PTSD sufferers by interacting with the CB1 and CB2 receptors so that it modulates the release of neurotransmitters, increases a sense of pleasure, and initiates the alternation of memory processes. CBD also blocks the continuous retrieval of the traumatic event, thereby enhancing its extension and reducing its associated anxiety.

Not only does CBD have anxiolytic and antipsychotic properties, but trials have also show that CBD is a safe and well-tolerated alternative treatment for schizophrenia. Patients who suffer from spinal cord diseases or damage can witness an improvement in bladder control muscle spasms, and spasticity with the use of CBD. CBD also stimulates a neuroprotective response that limits damage when it is administered shortly after a spinal cord injury and improves motor scores following the injury. Similarly, CBD protects neurons and astrocytes from damage when administered shortly after a stroke, which leads to improved functional, histological, biochemical, and neurobehavior recovery. Lastly, CBD's neuropotective effects limit brain damage following traumatic brain injury. 

This concludes our series on CBD and the therapeutic benefits it has for a multitude of conditions. This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Understanding Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) - Part 4

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Today we are continuing our discussion of THC in relation to various conditions and diseases.

THC can help Parkinson's sufferers by preventing the damage caused by free radicals while also activating receptors that encourage mitchondria formation. It also improves motor disability and impairments, tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia, sleep, and pain. There has been a lot of discussion lately as to whether or not cannabis can help in the treatment of PTSD. Research suggests the administration of THC, specifically, shortly after a traumatic event can help prevent the development of PTSD-like symptoms. THC not only lowers the pain associated with sickle-cell anemia, but also minimizes the commonly resulting vascular occlusion and tissue infarction.

THC helps those suffering from spinal cord diseases by improving pain, sleep, bladder function, spasticity, muscle twitching, and depression. It also treats spinal cord injuries by reducing swelling and compression lesion volume, preserving white matter and myelin, and improving locomotor function recovery. By activating CB1 and CB2 receptors and simulating the release of minocycline, THC is able to reduce brain swelling and neurological impairment in those who suffer a traumatic brain injury. This diffuses further injuries to the brain's axons following the injury. One study found that those who consume THC before the injury occurs are less like to die as a result. 

This concludes our discussion of THC for the treatment of varying conditions and diseases. This information has been brought to you by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Yale Study Finds Negative Outcomes for Marijuana Users With PTSD

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

One of the biggest forces behind the medical marijuana movement is allowing veterans who suffer from PTSD access to cannabis, but not everyone supports its use in treating the disorder. In contrast to the anecdotal evidence and a few smaller studies supporting the use of marijuana for PTSD, a recent study from Yale University discovered a link between marijuana use and higher levels of PTSD, alcohol abuse and violent behavior. Researchers analyzed data from 2,276 military veterans who completed specialized Veterans Affairs Treatment programs, and dividing the participants into four groups: "never users" who never used marijuana, "continuing users" who used marijuana before and after treatment, "starters" who used marijuana after treatment, and "stoppers" who stopped the use of marijuana after treatment. Researchers looked at PTSD symptom severity, violence, alcohol abuse, and drug abuse, and found "never users" and "stoppers" had the most positive outcomes with lower levels in all four categories. 

The lead researcher Samuel Wilkinson admitted they did not find a causal relationship between marijuana and PTSD, but he hoped the study would encourage people to use caution before jumping to marijuana for the treatment of PTSD. Many will be quick to make the judgment that this study reveals marijuana is ineffective when it comes to treating PTSD. PTSD is an indication for cannabis use in several states, and with the accumulation of data on such patients through research tools like our CannaBest Medical app for smartphones, perhaps the true answer can be established.

This information is provided by Marijuana Investor News and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Medical Marijuana Users Believe Drug's Effectiveness Is Greater Than Other Treatments

Very little comprehensive clinical research exists on the uses of medical marijuana in the treatment of various illnesses. That being said, countless patient testimonies attest to the efficacy of the treatment. We at CannaBest Medical believe this anecdotal evidence is substantial, and so do the people at PatientsLikeMe, who conducted a survey and found "a little more than 75% of users said they use medical cannabis because other treatments aren't as effective or cause too many side effects, or both." The survey also found that patients preferred the treatment because it was natural. They used it to treat pain, muscle stiffness or spasm, insomnia, anxiety, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, depression, PTSD, and ALS.

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