Marijuana and the Entourage Effect

Photo Credit: MaxPixel

Photo Credit: MaxPixel

Marijuana has a plethora of cannabinoids and terpenes, and while they’re known to have their own unique medicinal benefits when isolated, it’s when they work together that something truly amazing happens. For example, the two most well-known cannabinoids, THC and CBD, work to balance each other, so that CBD can reduce any negative side effects that THC might cause while boosting its positive outcomes. CBD has been show to counteract some of the negatives associated with marijuana, like tachycardia, sedation, intoxication, and other psychoactive effects.

Terpenes, which are the cannabis compounds responsible for the scent and flavor of marijuana, can also play a powerful role in the entourage effect. These chemicals can actually morph how cannabinoids bind to their receptors, and in doing so alter the effects that are produced. On their own, terpenes can affect sedation, pain relief, and provide antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antidepressant, and anti-anxiety effects. When working alongside cannabinoids, however, terpenes could work in tandem to treat acne, MRSA infections, and psychiatric illnesses.

In recent years, pharmaceutical companies have dedicated more time researching the combination of different cannabinoids rather than isolating them, pointing to the powerful effects that whole plant cannabis can offer. It is important to understand what cannabinoid and terpenoid combinations can produce the most effective relief for your symptoms, and our app can help! Remember to document your regimen daily in order to monitor which dose works best. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This post does not represent an endorsement on behalf of Leaf Science.

What Are The Medical Benefits of CBD? - Part 3

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

Let’s continue our discussion of which conditions could benefit from CBD treatment by beginning with strokes. One animal study found CBD reduced two types of brain damage caused by a stroke, so much so that the outcomes of the group which had the stroke were comparable to the control group that did not. Its neuroprotective properties may help prevent brain damage and help patients heal. When administered before trauma, CBD can also protect against the damage caused by spinal cord injury, and aid in the healing process. Because of its neuroprotective effects, CBD may also be beneficial for those with traumatic brain injury, and studies suggest the cannabinoid protects neurons following injury, reduces the formation of scar tissue, and regenerates neuronal axons. CBD may also treat nicotine addiction, and in one study involving 24 smokers, some smokers received a placebo inhaler while some received a placebo inhaler. Smokers were instructed to use the inhaler when cigarette cravings struck. Those who received the placebo did no reduce their cigarette usage, while those who received CBD reduced their use by 40%.

The medication Sativex, which contains equal parts CBD and THC, has been found to effectively lower scores of spasticity related symptoms in patients with moderate to severe Multiple Sclerosis, even when these patients were previously treatment-resistant. CBD also reduced the production of cytokines, and activated an important biological pathway blocked by multiple sclerosis. Sativex may also help those with ADHD. CBD was also found to improve social interaction and reduce hyperactivity in rats with ADHD. CBD may also promote wakefulness in those who suffer from sleep disorders that cause excessive sleep. CBD also improved the quality of sleep in young patients who suffered from PTSD. CBD may also help patients heal from liver disease. One study found CBD reduces the neurological damage and cognitive impairments caused by toxins that remain in the blood as a result of liver failure. CBD also restored liver and brain function. Lastly, when taken before and after surgery, CBD increased the success rates of bone marrow transplants, and patients who received CBD were less likely to develop graft versus host disease.

This concludes our series examining the many uses for CBD. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of CBD? - Part 2

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

In today’s post, we’ll continue our discussion of which conditions could benefit from CBD treatment.

We’ll begin with Alzheimer’s disease, which scientists believe CBD could treat or even prevent its onset. A 2013 study found CBD prevented the development of amyloid beta plaques, while another study found CBD promoted the growth of new brain cells that were lost to damage caused by the condition, and that it improved symptoms associated with cognitive deficits. The topical application of CBD may treat acne, and studies have found it can reduce inflammation and the production of sebum oil, as well as halt the development of acne. CBD can also help with psoriasis, and studies have found the cannabinoid can prevent the spread of cells that cause the condition’s patches. CBD may also help cancer patients, not only by reducing the nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy, but also by preventing the spread of cancer cells and causing cancer cell death. Studies have also found CBD slows the formation of blood vessels within tumors, thereby blocking nutrients from entering the tumor and slowing its growth.

CBD has also been earning a name lately for treating pain and reducing the need for the harmful opiate medications that are traditionally used. Studies have found CBD reduces inflammation and the sensory perception and emotional effects of pain. Research suggests CBD is more effective at treating long-term neuropathic pain than short-term pain. CBD may protect against heart disease, and studies have found the cannabinoid protects cardiac cells when blood supply to the heart is blocked, stops heart arrhythmia, and reduces cardiac damage when oxygen is block. CBD also reduces heart disease from diabetes by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress, scarring, and cell death. The topical application of CBD can target localized areas of pain caused by arthritis. Studies have found CBD blocks pain and prevents nerve damage from osteoarthritis, as well as uses anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects to blog the condition’s progression. Some studies have found CBD may be able to stabilize mood, something that could be helpful for those suffering from Bipolar Disorder. That said, CBD was only effective during depressive stages, and not during manic phases.

That’s not all! Stay tuned for tomorrow’s post to learn more about which conditions CBD could help. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of CBD? - Part 1

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

As legalization proceeds and barriers to medical marijuana research are knocked down, we are becoming more aware of just how powerful wide-reaching medical marijuana is. One of the cannabinoids getting the most attention is cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive cannabinoid that can help a myriad of conditions. In this series, we will discuss some of the many conditions CBD can treat.

Numerous studies have suggested CBD can reduce anxious feelings in those with anxiety disorders, and that it can effectively treated a variety of anxiety disorders, including OCD, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, PTSD, and social anxiety disorder. Studies also suggest CBD could benefit those who suffer from depression. Animal studies have shown CBD acts on the serotonin pathways in the brain, allowing it to act as an antidepressant, and one study found CBD reduces anhedonia, which is a symptom of depression that prevents people from feeling joy or happiness. CBD can also stop nausea and vomiting. One study found CBD effectively helped treat nausea in patients who did not get relief from traditional treatments. CBD may also help those with diabetes, and animal studies have found the cannabinoid slows the progression of diabetes and diabetic inflammations, as well as benefit complications associated with diabetes. CBD may also protect against diabetes, and one study found CBD prevented at-risk mice from developing the condition.

Perhaps the most well-known success story for CBD is its ability to treat epilepsy. CBD has acted as an anticonvulsant in animal models, and GW Pharmaceuticals have been testing their CBD oil Epidiolex with success. In the study, 25 and 50 mg/kg a day lowered seizure frequency by half while producing few mild side effects. Additionally, a 2013 survey of parents of children with treatment-resistant epilepsy found 84% reported reduced seizure frequency with CBD use. Lastly, and contrary to previous beliefs, CBD may treat schizophrenia and mental illnesses related to psychosis. It has been found to be as effective as antipsychotics with fewer side effects, and scientists believe this could be attributed to the stimulation of anandamide production. One study found CBD helped with hallucinations, delusions, lack of emotion, and reduced social functioning. CBD can also benefit those with Parkinson’s disease, and various studies have found CBD can help treat the sleep disturbances and psychosis associated with the disorder without worsening motor symptoms and while improving overall quality of life.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. In tomorrow’s post, we will continue to discuss some of the conditions CBD is able to treat.

Can Marijuana Help You Lose Weight?

Photo Credit: Max Pixel

Photo Credit: Max Pixel

Contrary to popular belief, marijuana may actually help people lose weight instead of gain weight. This seems contradictory to the fact that marijuana does in fact cause the munchies. One study from 2014 from the University of Bordeaux found THC interacts with CB1 receptor’s in the brain’s olfactory bulb, leading to a strengthened ability to smell food and increased food consumption. Additionally, research has found CB1 receptor activation leads to the release of the hormone ghrelin, which increases user appetite.

Still, studies have found marijuana use is linked to a lower body mass index (BMI), and one study from 2013 involving 13,000 adults found marijuana users had 16% lower fasting insulin levels and lower insulin resistance levels than non users. Additionally, marijuana users had smaller waist circumferences and lower BMI than non-users. Another study from 2015 found communities that had implemented medical marijuana programs were associated with 2-6% lower rates of obesity. Researchers believe marijuana’s ability to promote weight loss may be attributed to the cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). In a study from 2013, mice were fed 10 mg THCV once a day. These mice exhibited lower glucose intolerance, which is a symptom of type 2 diabetes. A lower glucose intolerance is associated with weight loss. Another way marijuana can help with weight loss is through activation of the CB2 receptors, which, according to an Australian study in 2015, reduces appetite and prevents the buildup of body fat. Another study from 2012 involving male rats found cannabidiol (CBD) reduced appetite and caused the rats to eat less food over time than those who were fed placebo.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana for Insomnia

Photo Credit: Sadie Hernandez (https://bit.ly/2KQlizp).

Photo Credit: Sadie Hernandez (https://bit.ly/2KQlizp).

New research suggests medical marijuana may be able to help people who suffer from sleep disorders like insomnia. Symptoms of insomnia include difficulty falling asleep, waking up in the middle of the night, sleepiness during the day, depression, anxiety, irritability, and worrying about sleep. The American Sleep Association claims 30% of adults suffer from short-term sleep issues, and 10% suffer from chronic insomnia. Current treatment options include prescribing sleep medication, treating conditions which may be causing the disorder, or undergoing behavioral therapy. Studies have found marijuana may be able to offer an alternative therapy for insomnia. One research review from 2017 found the cannabinoid THC could help patients fall asleep faster. Another study from 2004 found CBD had the opposite effect, and actually produced wake-inducing effects. Another study from 2006 found patients who were prescribed synthetic marijuana for pain also used the medication because it improved sleep. A study from 2004 found THC and Sativex reduced pain and increased sleep.

While marijuana can serve as a sleep aid, there are side effects that coincide with using the medication as well. It may reduce dreaming through diminishing REM sleep, cause a hangover-like effect, and become less effective over time. For most, reducing dreams would be a negative side effect, but acoording to one scientific review in 2017, this was actually a beneficial outcome for patients suffering from PTSD. For those patients, the synthetic cannabinoid nabilone effectively reduced nightmares. Various studies have found that using marijuana before bed can produce increased sleepiness, changes in mood, memory impairment, and increased daytime sleep the following day. Lastly, marijuana may be best used as an occasional sleep aid. Overtime, chronic used of the medication becomes less effective, but at the same time stopping its use can further make sleep difficult.

There are pros and cons to using marijuana as a sleep aid. When choosing to use the medication, it is best to use in lower doses and infrequently. If you use the medical cannabis for sleep, be sure to keep track of it with our journaling function. That way, you can monitor the frequency and strength of your dose, while also keeping track of whether or not its benefits outweigh its negative side effects. This information has been provided in part by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This post does not represent an endorsement on behalf of Leaf Science for our product.

Can Marijuana Help With Back Pain?

Photo Credit: WolfBlur/Pixabay

Photo Credit: WolfBlur/Pixabay

Marijuana’s analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties make it a potential candidate for reducing back pain. Currently, massages or chiropractic therapy, over-the-counter medications, and prescription medications like opioids are used to treat back pain. There are many clinical trials that suggest cannabis could be a powerful treatment option for pain reduction. One study found patients who inhaled vaporized cannabis three times a day over the course of five days significantly reduced their chronic pain. Another review of six clinical trials found “high quality” evidence that cannabis could provide powerful pain relief. One study found 34 patients with treatment-resistant chronic pain cannabis extracts significantly improved pain management. Indeed, most patients in the U.S. and Canada cite chronic pain as their main reason for using medical marijuana. Researchers believe cannabis is able to combat pain by interacting with the endocannabinoid system and blocking pain signals from being sent to the brain.

At a time when opioids are seemingly overprescribed and the opioid epidemic is rampant, medical marijuana is a welcomed player in pain management. One survey found 97% of participants successfully decreased their use of opioids thanks to marijuana. and 81% found cannabis was more effective on its own at treating their condition. Another survey found 63% of 166 respondents enrolled in Canada’s national medical cannabis system substituted prescriptions with cannabis, and 32% attributed their substitution to fewer side effects and better symptom management.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana for Autism

Photo Credit: PlusLexia.com

Photo Credit: PlusLexia.com

Autism is a developmental disability that may benefit from medical marijuana use. Although research surrounding medical cannabis for autism is lacking, interest is growing within the medical community, anecdotal evidence, and preclinical trials suggest medical marijuana may be able to help.

One 2017 study found the endocannabinoid system plays an important role in regulating neuroinflammation, something that would have a large impact on autism spectrum disorder. Researchers explain, “We postulate that modulation of the ES in ASD could prove a valuable tool to prevent or delay the progression of disease.” Because marijuana has the ability to interact with the endocannabinoid system and bind with its receptors, it could be a way to target the system and help those with autism. Another study found, specifically, that the CB2 receptor could be a potential target for pharmacological care for autism. Another study from Stanford University found altering the endocannabinoid system could contribute to autism pathophysiology. That said, these studies have been conducted on animal models, and so there should be caution before implementing medical marijuana as part of your treatment regimen until there ave been trials translating these effects to human models.

To try medical marijuana for autism, the dosing method is extremely important. Too large of a dose can exacerbate symptoms, while too little may not provide relief. Parents who have anecdotally attested to marijuana’s powers in autism treatment often start with high-CBD low-THC strains, and then titrate from there. Cannabis may also produce negative side effects in those with sub-diagnoses of autism that involve streptococcal infections and/or gastrointestinal and bacterial gut issues. Our journaling tool can make finding the right dose easy! With our app, you can enter the information of your dose, including the ratio of cannabinoids, the amount, how often you take it and the methods of intake, and then keep track of the results, so that you can monitor which combinations provide the best relief! Journaling daily is the most accurate way of keeping track of your regimen.

This information has been provided in part by Leaf Science, and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This does not represent an endorsement on behalf of Leaf Science for our product.

All About Cannabinoids - Part 2

Photo Credit: Toomaj F. Bungs | pexels (https://bit.ly/2I6rtyq)

Photo Credit: Toomaj F. Bungs | pexels (https://bit.ly/2I6rtyq)

In the previous post, we introduced the powerful chemicals in cannabis known as cannabinoids. Now, we will discuss in detail the unique properties found in cannabis.

Most people are aware of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is a cannabinoid that binds with the CB1 receptor in the brain and is responsible for producing the psychoactive effect of feeling “high.” THC is one of the more prevalent cannabinoids in marijuana, and it may be beneficial for patients who need to reduce nausea and vomiting, and pain. Although THC can offer therapeutic benefits, side effects include rapid heart rate, bloodshot eyes, dry mouth, dizziness, sedation, short-term memory, impaired concentration, and in severe cases, panic attack, hallucinations, and vomiting when consumed in large amounts. The other most well known cannabinoid is cannabidiol (CBD). CBD is popular for medicinal purposes because it does not produce a psychoactive effect, and can even buffer against the psychoactive effects of THC. CBD can help those who suffer from anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia, and most famously, pediatric epilepsy. It provides neuroprotective benefits and is known reduce pain and inflammation.

The cannabinoids cannabinol (CBN) is known for its antibacterial and analgesic properties, anticonvulsant and sedative effects, and appetite stimulation. Cannabichromene (CBC), like CBD, does not produce psychoactive effects. CBC acts as an analgesic, an antidepressant, and has antibacterial and antifungal properties. The cannabinoid could help treat those with acne or diarrhea. Cannabigerol (CBG) is a building block for all other cannabinoids, and it is known for providing pain relief, antifungal and antibacterial effects, reduce inflammation, and neuroprotective effects.

This concludes our short series on the cannabinoids in marijuana. To learn more, visit the Leaf Science website. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

All About Cannabinoids - Part 1

Photo Credit: Toomaj F. Bungs | pexels (https://bit.ly/2I6rtyq)

Photo Credit: Toomaj F. Bungs | pexels (https://bit.ly/2I6rtyq)

There are 113 known cannabinoids found in marijuana. Cannabinoids are the chemicals in marijuana that interact with cannabinoid receptors within the body’s endocannabinoid system in ways that mimic the body’s naturally produced endocannabinoids, which allows them to produce medicinal and recreational benefits. Because the endocannabinoid system is responsible for regulating appetite, sleep, pain, mood, and memory, medical marijuana is capable of producing a wide range of therapeutic benefits. Most people are familiar with the two most popular and well known cannabinoids, THC and CBD, but there are so many more cannabinoids that also offer medicinal benefits. In the following post, we will discuss in more detail what makes these cannabinoids unique and powerful.

This information has been brought to you by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana and Chronic Pain

Photo Credit: Jurassic Blueberries / Flickr (https://bit.ly/2OAkcaF)

Photo Credit: Jurassic Blueberries / Flickr (https://bit.ly/2OAkcaF)

Medical marijuana is recognized for its analgesic properties, which makes it beneficial for those who suffer from chronic pain or other pain producing conditions, and which could have significant implications in the fight against the opioid epidemic. One study published in 2015 in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) that analyzed six trials involving a total of 325 patients with chronic pain and six trials involving 396 patients with neuropathic pain found both THC and CBD provided effective analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Many find marijuana preferable to pharmaceutical medications because it is not only effective, but also has little habit-forming risk, has few side effects, and cannot cause a fatal overdose. States that have enacted medical marijuana laws have witnessed a 15-35% reduction in substance abuse admissions and opiate overdoses, according to public health records. Marijuana may provided an appropriate substitute for opioid medications and may also help with the withdrawal process from such medications.

To read about some of the studies to support these claims, visit the original post on Leaf Science’s website. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana And Sleep - Part 3

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Photo Credit: Pixabay

In our previous post, we discussed the ways marijuana affects sleep and what to look for when beginning to use marijuana for sleep. While marijuana can provide a myriad of benefits as a sleep aid, patients should use caution when using marijuana, as there are negative effects to come with it as well. Chronic or daily use of marijuana can actually impact sleep in a negative way. In a 2016 study, daily marijuana users experienced higher rates of insomnia and sleep disturbances than occasional marijuana users. That said, the correlation between an increase in sleep disturbances and marijuana use has not been established, and it is uncertain as to whether or not marijuana increases sleep disturbances or as to whether or not those who suffer from sleep disturbances tend to used marijuana more frequently. Studies have found, however, that those who use marijuana early on in life are at greater risk of sleep disturbances later, and 42% of daily marijuana users experienced sleep disturbances upon withdrawal. Additionally, the sleep-inducing effects of marijuana may persist into the morning if used before bedtime.

As was mentioned in the last post, our app can help you keep track of your dosing regimen, so that you can keep track of what works and what doesn’t. This information has been provided in part by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This post does not represent an endorsement by Leaf Science for our app.

Marijuana And Sleep - Part 2.

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Photo Credit: Pixabay

In our previous post, we discussed how marijuana can help those who suffer from sleep disturbances. In this post, we will continue our discussion by looking into how marijuana is able to do so.

Through the use of its cannabinoids, medical marijuana is able to provide sleep-related benefits by interacting with the endocannabinoid system, a bodily system responsible for regulating sleep. The cannabinoids can interact with receptors in the brain to influence the progression and duration of the sleep-wake cycle. THC reduces the amount of time one spends in the REM (rapid eye movement) stage of the sleep-wake cycle, which is the stage in which dreaming occurs. To the opposite effect, THC increases the duration of the slow-wave or deep sleep stage of the sleep-wake cycle. This stage is thought to play a vital role in the recuperation that results from a good night’s sleep.

When it comes to dosing marijuana for improved sleep quality, here are some things to be aware of. A strain containing a balanced cannabinoid composition is important for sleep therapy. The cannabinoid THC is known to aid in sleep, while CBD is actually an energizing and wake-promoting cannabinoid. That said, CBD can be helpful for those who want the benefits of THC without the psychoactive high as it acts as a buffer for some of these effects. The frequency of use is also important when it comes marijuana as a sleep aid; occasional use works well, but heavy or chronic use can actually have the opposite effect. To find the strain and frequency that work best for you, our app is a super helpful tool! Through journaling, you can enter the strain’s cannabinoid information and document how often you use it to figure out when marijuana helps and when it doesn’t.

While marijuana can help improve sleep, there are some things to be cautious of before beginning a medical marijuana regime. We will inform you of these in our following post. This information has been provided in part by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This post does not represent an endorsement for our app on behalf of Leaf Science.

Marijuana And Sleep - Part 1.

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Marijuana is beginning to gain notoriety as a sleep aid, helping those who struggle with sleep apnea and insomnia, and those who suffer from conditions like chronic pain and PTSD that are known to cause sleep disturbances. Even in healthy users, one 2013 study found volunteers who used marijuana had less difficulty falling asleep and it took a shorter amount of time to fall asleep. Another study from 1973 found THC reduced the amount of time insomniacs needed to fall asleep by over an hour. That said, proper dosing is important as too high of a dose could actually exacerbate symptoms. THC also could help those with sleep apnea by calming and stabilizing breathing. One study from 2013 found synthetic THC worked in a dose-dependent to improve breathing throughout the night in those who suffered from sleep apnea. THC was also found to help those who suffer from PTSD-related nightmares, and one study from 2009 found patients with PTSD slept longer, experienced higher quality sleep, and did not experience as many daytime flash backs the following day after synthetic THC administration. Lastly, chronic pain users attest to marijuana’s ability to improve their quality of sleep.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. In the following post, we will continue our discussion by looking into the specifics on how marijuana is able to affect sleep.

Can Marijuana Help With Nausea?

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Marijuana has long been promoted as an antiemetic, making it a viable option for those seeking relief from nausea. The cannabinoid THC is cannabis’ main active ingredient responsible for providing nausea relief by interacting with cannabinoid receptors in the brain that manage nausea and vomiting.. In one study, healthy volunteers received ipecac, a substance that stimulates vomiting, alongside THC. It was found that THC significantly reduced symptoms of queasiness and vomiting.

The antiemetic benefits provided by medical marijuana make it desirable for cancer and AIDS patients who seek relief from the nauseating side effects of their traditional treatment regimens. One study found patients undergoing chemotherapy experienced an absence of nausea and vomiting through the use of cannabinoids, and reported it as preferable to other treatments. Another study analyzed 30 studies of more than 1300 patients and found cannabinoid-based medications were more effective than other antiemetics in treating side effects of chemotherapy. Studies have also found cannabis’ nausea relief can help AIDS patients continue with their antiretroviral treatments, and THC can help stimulate appetite to combat weight loss.

This information has been brought to you by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

10 Facts About Cannabidiol (CBD)

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Cannabidiol is one of the better understood cannabinoids of the over 113 known cannabinoids that exist in cannabis. It’s gaining in popularity for its ability to treat a wide range of conditions without producing psychoactive side effects, but how well do you know the cannabinoid? Let’s look at the facts!

Because CBD does not act on the same receptors as THC, it is able to provide a myriad of health benefits without producing the psychoactive high that marijuana is known for. This makes the cannabinoid appropriate for use in pediatric treatment and makes it desirable among health professionals and patients who want symptom relief without any side effects. According to the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, CBD is able to act as an antiemetic, anticonvulsant, antipsychotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-tumoral and anti-cancer, anxiolytic and antidepressant, and an analgesic.

Although CBD can provide all of these benefits, one of the strengths of cannabinoid is that it is able work alongside other cannabinoids and terpenes to provide maximum relief through what is known as the “entourage effect.” Through this, CBD can actually buffer against the negative side effects of THC, so that patients can experience the therapeutic benefits of that cannabinoid with less severe side effects. CBD’s safety profile is so high that people have even started using it to treat ailments in their pets. Depending on dosage, CBD can either increase wakefulness among users, or provide sedative effects that facilitate sleeping. Larger doses help people stay asleep longer, while small doses help stimulate energy and help people wake up.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of Marijuana? - Part 4.

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

After having discussed so many way marijuana can be applicable in medicinal instances, it’s time we conclude our discussion.

Many people may be aware of short spurts of anxiety following marijuana use, but what they don’t know is that marijuana could actually improve anxiety long-term. The non-psychoactive cannabinoid CBD, specifically, has been deemed as effective as approved anti-anxiety medications. Studies have found marijuana may manage the overactive immune system associated with lupus. This, as well as marijuana’s inherent anti-inflammatory properties, can help alleviate symptoms of pain and inflammation that coincide with the condition. Many patients have experienced relief from the pain and inflammation associated with arthritis, however these results have proven inconsistent in what studies exist, and while the medication is well tolerated, some patients did not experience any relief at all. More research is desired.

Cannabinoids also help stimulate bone formation, prevent bone resorption, and prevent loss of bone mass making marijuana a potentially powerful player in therapy for osteoporosis. By reducing the side effects associated with Hepatitis C treatment regimens, marijuana use encourages patients to complete their treatments and helps lead patients to remission. Its stimulation of certain receptors may also improve treatment outcomes. Marijuana may also help those who suffer from severe headaches like migraines by reducing their frequency and severity. Lastly, researchers have discovered lower prevalence of diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in marijuana users. Marijuana users, in general, have lower insulin levels, smaller waists, are less likely to be obese.

This concludes our post on the many ways marijuana can treat a myriad of symptoms. Thanks for following along for the discussion! This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of Marijuana? - Part 3.

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

In the last post, we continued to look at the conditions where medical marijuana is effective. It’s not done yet! We’ll continue the discussion below.

While the relationship between marijuana and heart disease is complicated, and cannabis can actually exacerbate symptoms in some users by increasing heart rate and blood pressure, scientists have found low doses of THC can reduce damage from heart attacks, and CBD can be used as a treatment for cardiovascular disease. Cannabis may also reduce the severity and lessen the impact of a stroke. Although most studies thus far have been animal studies, researchers believe medical cannabis may help treat the symptoms of Huntington’s disease, and one human study found synthetic THC improved motor-related symptoms of the disorder. Animal studies have found cannabis may slow the progression of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and many properties of cannabis could help reduce pain, relax muscles, reduce saliva, stimulate appetite, and induce sleep. Synthetic cannabinoids also improved pain symptoms in fibromyalgia patients, and one survey found patients actually preferred cannabis to any approved pharmaceutical medication.

New support is starting to accumulate for the use of marijuana for Alzheimer’s disease. Marijuana may be able to do so by reducing inflammation and the formation of plaques. Marijuana has been found to alleviate tics and be well tolerated in patients with Tourette’s syndrome. Cannabis topicals are now offered as effective treatments for varying skin disorders, and its anti-inflammatory and anti-itching properties make it effective for the treatment of acne, dermatitis, and psoriasis. Marijuana may also help those who suffer from sleep disorders like insomnia and sleep apnea fall asleep quicker and improve breathing during sleep. Lastly, and probably most well known, is medical marijuana’s ability to treat epilepsy. Specifically, the cannabinoid CBD is well-tolerated and effective in reducing the frequency and severity of seizures.

There are even many more conditions to talk about regarding medical marijuana treatment. Keep reading as we conclude our discussion in the next post! This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of Marijuana? - Part 2.

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

In our previous post, we began to look at the conditions medical marijuana can help, but it doesn’t end there! Let’s continue that discussion now.

Medical marijuana may help those with inflammatory bowel disease, including conditions like Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. Marijuana may improve symptoms to the point of remission and can help patients ween off of traditional medications. Marijuana may also help those with Parkinson’s disease, and patients have experienced relief from tremor severity and pain symptoms. Surprisingly, marijuana may also help those with asthma. Because THC acts as a bronchodilator, it opens up the pathways of the lungs, reduces spasms, and prevents over-inflation of the lungs. Not surprisingly, marijuana is known to stimulate appetite, which can be extremely beneficial for patients suffering from conditions like AIDS and cancer, where appetite loss is a common symptom of the conditions and side effect of the disorders’ treatments. On the other hand, marijuana can also help combat obesity. Although it is able to increase appetite, marijuana is still associated with a smaller waistline and lower cholesterol in users than in non-users, and it has been found to better manage glucose levels.

As mentioned in the previous post in relation to cancer, medical marijuana is effective in the treatment of nausea and vomiting, and it can be so effective at treating this common side effect associated with chemotherapy and HIV/AIDS treatment regimens that it can allow patients to continue with these unpleasant treatments. Medical marijuana can also improved the recovery and survival rates of patients with traumatic brain injury. Similarly, researchers believe phytocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids could improve the outcomes of spinal cord injury, as well, due to the fact they have observed increases in the body’s natural endocannabinoid production following injury in an attempt to prevent damage.

Thanks for following up with today’s post on the medical benefits of medical marijuana. Still, there are so many more conditions where medical marijuana is useful! We’ll continue our discussion of more conditions in the next post. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of Marijuana? - Part 1.

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Photo Credits: Leaf Science

Medical marijuana is now being touted for having a wide range of medicinal benefits that allow it to provide therapeutic relief for many different conditions. In this four part series, we will take an in depth look at many of the medical conditions it is capable of treating.

One of the most commonly cited and widely approved conditions for marijuana use is chronic pain. Marijuana is known for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, making it effective in reducing pain and providing relief for the conditions that cause it, like arthritis, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and migraines. Medical marijuana is also used for treating glaucoma, a condition that affects sight and can damage the optic nerve due to increased pressure in the eye. Studies have found marijuana decreases intraocular eye pressure by 25-30%, and scientists believe its neuroprotective properties could prevent the optic nerve from getting damaged. Medical marijuana may also help those suffering from liver disease. The cannabinoid CBD can prevent liver fibrosis, while THC may be able to help improve the symptoms associated with cholestatic liver disease.

Marijuana is also promoted as a hero for cancer patients, mainly for its ability to reduce the nausea and vomiting accompanying chemotherapy treatments. Even more exciting, in rodent models, THC and cannabinoids have been found to induce apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting healthy cells. In other rodent models, THC reduced tumor size. Contrary to what has long been claimed by prohibitionists about cannabis’ relationship to schizophrenia, studies have found non-psychoactive compounds like CBD may actually benefit psychosis. CBD is antipsychotic and generally well tolerated. But be careful, as THC may actually exacerbate symptoms. Lastly, recent clinical trials have found medical marijuana help those with multiple sclerosis by combatting muscle spasticity, reducing pain, and improving sleep quality.

That concludes today’s post on the medical benefits of medical marijuana, but there’s still so much more to discuss! Tune into the following post where we will look at more conditions where medical marijuana’s usage is applicable. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.