Medical Marijuana Patients Reduce Their Prescription Drug Use, Study Finds

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

A new study conducted by researchers from DePaul University and Rush University, College of Nursing and published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Care has determined patients registered in state medical marijuana programs tend to reduce their use of prescription medications. In the study, which involved 34 registered medical marijuana patients in Illinois, respondents claimed the onset of medical cannabis relief was quicker than other medications, and they found it had fewer side effects. Most patients used medical cannabis as a replacement for opioids, anticonvulsants, anti-inflammatories, and over-the-counter analgesics. The authors explained, “[O]ur results indicate that MC (medical cannabis) may be used intentionally to taper off prescription medications. These findings align with previous research that has reported substitution or alternative use of cannabis for prescription pain medications due to concerns regarding addiction and better side-effect and symptom management, as well as complementary use to help manage side-effects of prescription medication.”

This data supports previous studies with similar findings. This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.