Cannabinoids May Be Effective for Treating Alzheimer's Disease, Finds New Study

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Researchers from the Anesthesiology Institute at Cleveland Clinic have determined agonists of the CB2 receptor provide neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects that reduce brain cell damage, which could have beneficial implications for those who suffer from Alzheimer's disease. In the animal study, which was published in the European Journal of Pharmacology, researchers administered CB2 agonists which resulted helped to suppress neuroinflammation and enhance the removal of amyloid-beta plaques, which led to an increase in brain cell recovery and an improvement in cognitive performance. Researchers used the CB2 agonist MDA7 to mimic the effects of cannabinoids. 

The researchers right, "CB2 receptors act as a negative feedback regular; when activated by a CB2 agonist, they can help limit the extent of the neuroinflammatory response and the subsequent development of neuronal damage in the central nervous system... Collectively, these findings suggest that [a CB2 agonist] has a potential therapeutic effect in the setting of AD.” This study supports the findings of previous studies involving cannabinoids and Alzheimer's disease, and suggests cannabinoids could also be beneficial for other degenerative neuroinflammatory diseases.  

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc, and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can find the text of the study here