Study: Marijuana Does Not Lead to an Increase in Psychotic Symptoms

 Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Even as medical marijuana gains momentum as a safe an effective treatment option for a variety of symptoms, negative connotations concerning cannabis continue to exist. These connotations can produce negative stigmas and lead to fears about the outcomes of marijuana use. One such fear is that marijuana may contribute to an increase in psychotic symptoms and episodes, but now a study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health states there is "minimal evidence" of any association between cannabis use alone and the onset of psychotic symptoms in young people.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania Department of Psychiatry looked through a cohort of 4,171 people between the ages of 14 and 21 in order to determine if there exists a relationship between drug use and the onset of psychotic symptoms. After adjusting for potential confounders, researchers determined, "neither frequent nor early cannabis use predicted increased odds of psychosis spectrum classification... Overall, we found minimal evidence for associations between cannabis use by itself and psychosis spectrum symptoms.”

These findings are similar to those of previous studies assessing cannabis use and psychosis. This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.