Study: Cannabis Use Associated With Decreased Crack Cocaine Consumption

Photo Credit: Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: Daily Chronic

Longitudinal data published in the journal Addictive Behaviors suggests cannabis consumption is associated with a decline in crack cocaine use. Canadian researchers looked at cannabis and crack cocaine use in a group of 122 subjects for three years, and found intentional cannabis use reduced the frequency of crack cocaine use. Authors write, "In this longitudinal study, we observed that a period of self-reported intentional use of cannabis … was associated with subsequent periods of reduced use of crack [cocaine]. … Given the substantial global burden of morbidity and mortality attributable to crack cocaine use disorders alongside a lack of effective pharmacotherapies, we echo calls for rigorous experimental research on cannabinoids as a potential treatment for crack cocaine use disorders.”

This study supports other findings suggesting cannabis may have beneficial implications for the treatment of addiction in a variety of substances. This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic an approved by our Chief Medical Officer.