Study Finds People are Using Cannabis in Place of Prescription Drugs

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A survey conducted by researchers from Bastyr University Research Institute and published in the Journal of Pain Research found individuals use cannabis instead of prescription medication, whether or not they are registered medical marijuana patients. Of the self-selected national sample of 2,774 self-identified marijuana user respondents, 46% used cannabis instead of prescriptions. Marijuana was most commonly used instead of pain-relieving narcotics and opioids (36%), anti-anxiety medication like anxiolytics and benzodiazepenes (14%), and antidepressants (13%). The implementation of medical marijuana roles played little role in whether or not respondents made this substitution. Researchers determined, "Despite the illegality of cannabis in many states and the lack of professional guidance on dosing, routes of delivery and inadequate standardization or quality control for medical use, individuals are taking it upon themselves to augment, or discontinue, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs in favor of a largely unregulated herbal one."

This information supports previous findings, and researchers say, ‚ÄúThese data contribute to a growing body of literature suggesting cannabis, legal or otherwise, is being used as a substitute for prescription rugs, particularly pain relievers." This information can be found on Medical Marijuana Inc., and it has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer.