What is CBG (Cannabigerol)?

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

When learning about medical marijuana, it's easy to find information surrounding the major cannabinoid compounds like CBD and THC, but there are some lesser known cannabinoids that are also valuable. One non-psychoactive cannabinoid, cannabigerol (CBG), is considered the building block or parent of THC and CBD, and once it is synthesized, it is converted into these other cannabinoids. Most cannabis strains have little to no concentrations of CBG, and it may be more common in hemp. 

The cannabinoid can buffer against the psychoactive effects of other cannabinoids by promoting synergy. It also acts on both CB1 and CB2 receptors, although its interactions are weak in comparison with stronger cannabinoids like THC. Still, it may benefit in the treatment of central nervous system disorders, neurological diseases, skin disorders, chronic pain, and more. It may also combat depression by blocking serotonin receptors. CBG increases anandamide levels, and thereby benefits the regulation of sleep, appetite, and memory. CBG inhibits the uptake of the brain chemical GABA, which regulates the activity of neurons, and it may do so at a greater extent than both THC and CBD. More research is left to be desired, but studies have already shown CBG may stimulate bone formation and healing, halt tumor growth, act as an antifungal and antibacterial agent, relieve pain, provide neuroprotective effects, reduce inflammation, and treat overactive bladder, psoriasis or other skin disorders, glaucoma, depression, and anxiety. 

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.