CBD Improves Quality of Life Measures in Parkinson's Disease Patients, Trial Finds

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology has determined patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease may be able to improve their quality of life and overall well-being with the use of CBD. The double-blind clinical trial, which was conducted by researchers at Brazil’s University of São Paulo, involved 21 patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease without demential or comorbid psychiatric conditions. The patients were separated into three groups, and then given either placebo, 75mg CBD, or 300 mg CBD over the course of six weeks. At five weeks in, researchers tested for motor and general symptoms, well-being and quality of life, and neuroprotective effects. To measure well-being and quality of life, researchers provided patients with the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire, which considers mobility, activities of daily living, emotional well-being, stigma, social support, cognition, communication, and bodily discomfort.

Those receiving the more potent dose displayed significant improvements in quality of life and well-being. There were no major differences in motor symptoms and neuroprotective effects between the different groups after 6 weeks, but researcher explained this may be attributed to the small sample size, the short duration of the study, or the fact that many patients were in the early stages of the disease and so had low baseline scores. The study concludes, “Nowadays, most drugs used in the treatment of [Parkinson’s disease] act in the dopaminergic system and little is known about the role of other neurotransmitter systems in the disease… The endocannabinoid system seems to be an important target of investigation, mostly because of its action in those considered as the non-motor symptoms of [Parkinson’s disease and of reports of its possible neuroprotective effects.”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also access the study here.