Marijuana Use Linked to Lower Risk of Heart Failure, Cardiac Disease, and In-Hospital Mortality, Study Finds

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A multivariable adjusted study published by Cancer Medicine suggests hospitalized patients who test positive for marijuana have a lower risk of heart failure, cardiac disease, or in-hospitality mortality. Researchers from the University of Northern Colorado, Colorado State University, and the University of Alabama analyzed the relationship between cannabis use and health outcomes in a nationwide sample involving 3.9 million patients over the course of 4 years. Of the patients examined, 387,608 were marijuana users. They found patients who tested positive for marijuana were at lower risk of heart failure and cardiac disease, and while they also were at higher risk of experiencing a stroke, they were more likely to survive that event. 

Researchers wrote, “The odds of in-hospital mortality were significantly reduced among marijuana users compared with non-users overall, and among cancer patients.” They concluded that more research is necessary, but that these results are especially positive for certain populations. Researcher wrote, “Larger prospective studies with objective measures of marijuana use and health outcomes will be needed to better examine these associations. Nevertheless, these findings provide information suggesting that marijuana use is negatively associated with certain health outcomes that may be important for older, sicker population groups.”

This information has been brought to you by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also read text from the study here