Study: History of Marijuana Use Helps Reduce In-Hospital Mortality

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Evidence suggests marijuana may be able to reduce in-hospital mortality by reducing the risk of experiencing heart failure or cardiac disease, and by increasing the survival rate among cancer patients. The study, which can be found in the journal Cancer Medicine, involved researchers from University of Northern Colorado, Colorado State University, and the University of Alabama. They analyzed the links between marijuana use and health outcomes in a nationwide sample of 3.9 million patients in hospitals. While the results suggested hospitalized patients who tested positive for marijuana were more likely than non-users to seek hospitalization for a stroke, they were less likely to suffer heart failure or cardiac disease, and cancer patients experienced increased survival rates. 

Authors of the study wrote, “Odds of in-hospital mortality were significantly reduced among marijuana users compared with non-users in all hospitalized patients as well as cancer patients.” This information is supported by previous findings, which pointed to an increase in survival rate for patients who were hospitalized for a heart attack or traumatic brain injury.

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.