Medical Cannabis Studies Being Conducted Throughout U.S. and Internationally

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

One of the biggest hurdles when it comes to legalizing medical marijuana is that there are few large scale clinical trials sufficient enough to provide evidence of medical marijuana's benefits. There are countless small scale studies or non human trials, but few large scale studies with quality product have been conducted. This is mainly due to medical marijuana's status as a Schedule I drug, which makes access to the plant difficult. That being said, restrictions are becoming loosened, and several hospitals and research centers around the world and across the nation are currently looking into various therapeutic aspects of cannabis.

The University of Miami’s Project to Cure Paralysis and Miller School of Medicine is beginning to look into the use of CBD for concussions and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The Thomas Jefferson University recently founded a medical marijuana research institute in Philadelphia, where it will first investigate the use of THC and CBD for epilepsy, PTSD, and chronic neuropathic pain. St. Francis Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut will examine the use of cannabis as a pain reliever and replacement for opiates for patients who have suffered traumatic injuries. Connecticut Hospice Inc. in Branford will look into the use of cannabis for hospice care, examining how marijuana might alleviate pain and nausea and increase appetite in terminally ill patients. Lastly, AXIM® Biotechnologies, will begin studying cannabis-based CBD gum for the relief of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms in the Netherlands.

Read more about the specific ways in which these studies are being conducted in this article provided by Medical Marijuana Inc., and stay tuned for the updated results of these exciting new studies. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer.