New Study: Doctors Are Not Worried About Marijuana

Photo Credit: Merry Jane

Photo Credit: Merry Jane

We frequently hear about where medical marijuana patients and advocates stand on medical marijuana legalization, and national polls increasingly show how Americans in general feel about the subject, but where do the physicians, the prescribers of the medication, stand? According to a new paper outlined by the Washington Post regarding a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS), physicians are less concerned about marijuana than they are about alcohol and tobacco use. Physician Nathanial P. Morris wrote in the Scientific American, "We don't see cannabis overdoses... We don't order scans for cannabis-related brain abscesses. We don't treat cannabis-induced heart attacks... In medicine, marijuana use is often seen on par with tobacco or caffeine consumption—something we counsel patients about stopping or limiting, but nothing urgent to treat or immediately life-threatening."

Other studies have suggested prohibitionist concerns over marijuana and health are exaggerated. A study from Arizona State found the sole health issue concerning chronic chronic marijuana use was increased risk for gum Disease. Another study pooling more than 1,000 lifelong cannabis users concluded smoking weed was about as much of a harm to a person’s health as forgetting to floss. Authors wrote, "Across several domains of health (periodontal health, lung function, systemic inflammation, and metabolic health), clear evidence of an adverse association with cannabis use was apparent for only one domain, namely, periodontal health."

This information has been provided by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.