Study: Cannabis-Based Medicines As Potential Treatments For Traumatic Brain Injuries

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

A new study from The American Surgeon suggests patients with detectable levels of THC in their bodies are less likely to die as a result of traumatic brain injury (TBI) than those who do not. The retrospective looked at 446 cases of TBI  over a course of three years at the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, CA. Of the TBI patients sampled, 18.4% had toxicology reports positive for the presence of THC, and the death rate for all cases examined was 9.9%. After adjusting for differences that may confound results, the death rate for TBI patients who had no traceable amounts of THC was around 11.5%, but for those who had traces of THC in their bodies, the death rate was only 2.4% (approximately 80 less than THC-negative patients). 

Unfortunately, the nature of retrospective studies limits the potential for determining the cause and effect relationship between THC and the survival rate of TBI patients, and the specific variables regarding cannabis use remain unknown. That being said, these results support other evidence that suggests endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids can prevent or halt brain injury.

This information has been provided by Medical Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.