Marijuana Allows 45% of Pain and Anxiety Patients to Eliminate Use of Prescription Pill, Study Finds

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

A new observational study involving 146 patients and conducted by Canada's Canabo Medical Inc. has found medical cannabis causes a drop in reliance on benzodiazepine for anxiety and pain patients. In the study, 40% of patients who used medical cannabis for pain and/or anxiety eliminated the use of benzodiazepines within 90 days, and after a years time the number increased to 45%. The majority of patients, at 61.3%, were using benzodiazepines to treat pain conditions. Another 27.4% used the prescription to treat anxiety, and 11.3% used the medications to treat neurological conditions.

Lead researcher Dr. Neil Smith explains, â€œWe wanted to take a close look at the likelihood of continued benzodiazepine usage after commencing medical cannabis treatments and, to be perfect honest, the results are extremely promising... When conducting this type of research, experts are typically encouraged by an efficacy rate in the neighborhood of 10 percent. To see 45 percent effectiveness demonstrates that the medical cannabis industry is at a real watershed moment.” This study is significant in that cannabis, which has a high safety profile and lacks risk of addiction, may be able to stand in for benzodiazepines, which produce dizziness, headaches, memory impairment, and have the potential for abuse. In 2013, 30% of prescription pill overdoses were related to benzodiazepines. Cannabis can be a safe and effective alternative treatment for pain and anxiety. 

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.