Cannabis a Potential Treatment for Crack Cocaine Disorders, Study Suggests

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Through the many studies analyzing the use of medical marijuana for pain management, researchers have found cannabis effectively reduces the use of opioids and subsequently fights the harmful side effects of addiction. Now, a new study suggests this fight against addiction can extend to other substances like crack cocaine, saying intentional use of cannabis can help those with crack cocaine disorders and reduce their frequency of crack use. The study, which was led by Dr. M-J Milloy from the University of British Columbia's St. Paul's Hospital and published in Addictive Behaviors, looked at the use of cannabis on the frequency of crack cocaine use among those who abused the substance. During periods of intentional cannabis use, the frequency of crack cocaine use among participants decreased.

Researchers used data from three prospective Vancouver-based cohort studies between 2012 and 2015 and adjusted analyses to compare use before, during, and after intentional cannabis use. They found crack use was significantly lower after periods of cannabis use than before, but during these periods, use was not significantly different. Following these periods, cannabis use remained higher when compared to before these periods, but use was lower than within these intentional use periods. An earlier study found cannabis reduced cravings and helped cease the use of crack in 68% of abusers.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. Text of the study can be accessed here