Cannabis Cuts Seizure Frequency In 86% Of Patients With Refractory Epilepsy

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Scientists examining the effects of medical marijuana for the treatment of refractory epilepsy in two legalized states found the medication reduced seizure frequency in 86% of the 272 patients involved. The study, which was led by Dustin Sulak, Russell Saneto, and Bonnie Goldstein was published in Epilepsy & Behavior. Of the participants, 10% experienced complete seizure freedom, 28% experienced a 76-99% reduction in seizures, 17% experienced a 51-75% reduction, 18% experienced a 26-50% reduction, and 15% experienced between 1-25% seizure reduction. Only minor adverse side effects were reported, and patients also reported an increased alertness as a benefit. Only 14% found cannabis was ineffective for seizure treatment. Researchers hope for more research involving cannabis and epilepsy so that they can better understand the dose-response relationship with cannabinoids and seizures. This study found a non-linear dose-response relationship, meaning a higher dose is not always more effective.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc, and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also read the text of the study here