Long Term Marijuana Use Doesn’t Increase Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Because research into the uses of medical marijuana is relatively new, there is still concern as to whether or not marijuana can have a negative impact long-term. One such concern was whether or not marijuana use increased ones risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Now, longitudinal data published in the American Journal of Public Health suggests those who use marijuana needn't worry, as long-term consumers are at no greater risk for cardiovascular disease than those with no history of marijuana use by the time they reach middle age. 

A team of researchers from the U.S. and Switzerland looked at cumulative cannabis use and cardiovascular risk in a group of 5,000 subjects over the course of more than two decades. They found, “Compared with no marijuana use, cumulative lifetime and recent marijuana use showed no association with incident CVD (cardiovascular disease), stroke or transient ischemic attacks, coronary heart disease, or CVD mortality... In this community-based cohort of young adults followed for more than 25 years, we found no evidence to suggest that cumulative lifetime or recent marijuana use, at levels typical of most recreational, occasional users of marijuana in the United States, affects risk of future CVD events through middle age.”

This information has been provided by The Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.