Is Marijuana Medicine?

Photo Credit: Health MJ

Photo Credit: Health MJ

Although the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not recognized marijuana as a medicine federally, and has also hindered it's research by classifying it as a Schedule I substance, there are several scientific studies surrounding the chemicals in the plant that suggest it could provide powerful therapeutic relief. Additionally, while the FDA has not recognized the plant as having medicinal value, the administration has approved medications containing the plants cannabinoid chemicals in pill form. Cannabis contains hundreds of cannabinoids, but the two most recognized include delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the well-known psychoactive ingredient, and cannabidiol (CBD), the cannabinoid being widely praised for its effects on chronic pain and childhood epilepsy.

Both THC and CBD have beneficial effects on a wide array of symptoms and illnesses. THC increases appetite and reduces nausea, pain, inflammation, and muscle control problems. CBD reduces pain and inflammation, epileptic seizures, and may treat mental illness and addictions. Continuing research on animals and cultures have found marijuana extracts may kill certain cancer cells and reduce the size of others. A cell culture revealed purified extracts from whole-plant marijuana halts cancer cell growth from serious brain tumors. In mice, purified extracts of THC and CBD helped enhance the effects of radiation on killing cancer cells. Other current preclinical and clinical trials are focusing on cannabis' effects on autoimmune diseases, inflammation, pain, seizures, substance use disorders, and mental disorders. 

This information has been provided by Health MJ and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.