Terpene Series: Phellandrene, Carene and Sabinene

Photo Credit: BBC Good Food

Photo Credit: BBC Good Food

Phellandrene smells of peppermint with hints of citrus, and is known for its ability to treat the digestive tract. The terpene found in many essential oils, including eucalyptus oil, and various herbs and spices like cinnamon, garlic, dill, ginger, and parsley. It is also the main component of turmeric oil, which is used to prevent and treat systemic fungal infections. The smells of another terpene, sabinene, might remind you of the winter holidays. An ongoing study suggests sabinene may offer a natural source for antioxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs that can be used in food supplements, nutraceuticals, and plant-based medicines. 

The last terpene we will discuss is, carene, which has a pungent and sweet odor. In high concentrations, the terpene serves as a central nervous system depressant. Carene is also used to dry out excess body fluids, like tears, mucus, and sweat. While the chemical isn't toxic, inhaling it can cause irritation, leading some to wonder if high concentrations of the terpene in certain cannabis strains may be responsible for the infamous smoking side effects of coughing, an itchy throat, and eye irritation. 

This concludes our series examining the different terpenes in cannabis. For more information, go to MedicalJane.com. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer.