Doctor Hopes Medical Marijuana Clinical Trials Could Make Pot Schedule II

Photo Credit: Ryan Bushby (HighInBC) - Wikimedia Commons

Photo Credit: Ryan Bushby (HighInBC) - Wikimedia Commons

After completing Phase one of clinical trial testing on the use of medical cannabinoids for the treatment of epilepsy, lead researcher and epileptologist Dr. Paul Lyons released positive results of his study at a symposium hosted by the Winchester Neurological Consultants. The double-blinded study conducted over the course of four months involved a group of 14 children who suffered from severe LGS epilepsy, and not even Lyons knew who received the cannabinoid-based medication Epidiolex and who received placebo. Lyons discussed the results, saying, "We've had a significant reduction in number of seizures, severity of seizures, and increase in the number of seizure-free days, and just as importantly, improvement in cognition."

These results go beyond offering children with epilepsy a safe and effective medication for treating their symptoms. Dr. Lyons hopes this research will confirm marijuana's potential as a powerful medicinal alternative to pharmaceuticals and will lead to its rescheduling from Schedule I to a Schedule II substance, a move that would open the doors to more substantial research. He explains, "I hope that this would move the dialogue on the medical indication for medical cannabinoids in the U.S. and clearly distinguish that from recreational use... In that way, the federal government, through the FDA and the DEA, could be the leaders on establishing logical, rational, and readily available research for these kinds of diseases so patients don't have to wait years for clinical trials as they did with this case."

This information has been provided by the Virginia news outlet Your4State and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.