A Brief Overview of Medical Marijuana Research

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Because cannabis is classified as a Schedule I substance, there have been countless obstacles standing in the way of the clinical research surrounding the plant's medicinal and therapeutic properties. That being said, what research does exist has revealed that the plant could have benefits of a wide array of symptoms and illnesses, including neuropathic pain, nausea and spasms, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, HIV/AIDS, diabetes, cancer, traumatic brain injuries and spinal cord injuries.

The serious research of medical cannabis began in the 1940s, and increased until the 1970s when the first cannabinoids were discovered. The golden age of medical marijuana research began around 1988 with the discovery of the body's endocannabinoid system, which is responsible for regulating physiological processes like mood, memory, pain, appetite and movement. It was around this time that scientists discovered marijuana's cannabinoids were able to interact with the endocannabinoid system's CB1 and CB2 receptors. As a result of this discovery, studies began to explore ways in which cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system could play a role in health and disease. Americans for Safe Access claims there are now over 15,000 peer-reviewed scientific articles that have been published by medical journals and discuss cannabis and its cannabinoids.

We hope you will continue to journal daily so that you can anonymously contribute to a broader understand of how medical marijuana best treats specific diseases and symptoms. This information has been brought to you by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.