Can Medical Marijuana Treat Multiple Sclerosis?

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

Photo Credit: Wikimedia

For those who suffer from multiple sclerosis and do not experience significant relief from pharmaceutical medications, it may be time to give medical marijuana a try. There is plenty of anecdotal evidence to suggest medical marijuana can provide therapeutic relief for symptoms of MS, and while research is limited, early studies seem to back these claims. Medical cannabis can be helpful in providing relief for various symptoms associated with MS. The plant may calm muscle spasms which allows for better mobility. It can also help with an overactive bladder by easing muscle spasms that cause the frequent urge to pee. By combatting nerve pain, mmj can ease pain in general and even help patients get a good night's sleep.

The medication may take weeks to take noticeable effect, but for those who have tried all other options without success, it may provide worthwhile relief. Doctors recommend using medical marijuana as a pill or spray because it is easy to monitor how much active chemical a patient receives. There are relatively few adverse side effects that coincide with marijuana use, but some short-term effects include: increased heart rate, slowed reaction time, difficulties with coordination or balance, dizziness, dry mouth, or sleepiness. Long-term effects may include anxiety, mood swings, and trouble with complex thinking.

With about half of the states in the U.S. having legalized some form of medical marijuana, the plant is becoming more widely accepted as a treatment option for combatting various illnesses and symptoms, including MS. This information has been provided by WebMD and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.