Study: Marijuana Associated With Decreased Migraine Frequency

Photo Credit: NORML

Photo Credit: NORML

Recent data published online ahead of print in the journal Pharmacotherapy suggests marijuana administration results in decreased migraine frequency. Investigators at the University of Colorado, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical scientists looked at the effects of cannabis on the frequency of monthly migraine headache. The 121 participants of the study were diagnosed with migraine headache, recommended cannabis by a physician for its treatment, and had attended a followup meeting. Of the participants, 85 percent reported a decrease in migraine frequency and 12 percent said using cannabis before the migraine began would actually prevent it. The preferred method of intake, dose, and strain of medical marijuana for the use of migraine headache therapy has not yet been determined.

The use of medical marijuana for migraine relief is not a new theory, though very few trials have actually documented the effects of cannabis on migraine patients. Back in 2007, Italian researchers wrote in the European Journal of Critical Pharmacology, noting that patients with chronic migraines possessed significantly low levers of endogenous cannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol in their platelets. This supports the theory that cannabis and the endocannabinoid system might play a significant role in migraine regulation.

This information has been provided by NORML and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also find an abstract of the study here.