Must Everybody Get Stoned? Getting Juiced Takes on New Meaning

Photo Credit: Marijuana Investory News

Photo Credit: Marijuana Investory News

For many medical marijuana patients, the point of marijuana consumption is for symptom relief and not for the psychoactive effects that give the plant its recreational reputation. Non-psychotropic strains high in CBD are gaining in popularity, and its demand sometimes outreaches supply, so what is a patient to do if he or she encounters a situation where there are no high-CBD strains available, or where the strain composition is simply untested or unknown? For situations like these, a patient can use a method of consumption called "juicing," in which the cannabinoid THC remains in its acidic state, Tetrahydrocannabinolic Acid (THC-A). 

THC, the cannabinoid responsible for creating a psychoactive experience, is only produced once the chemical compound changes state through a process called decarboxylation when heat is applied. Therefore, when no heat is applied to marijuana, THC-A remains in its natural acidic state and remains lacking in psychoactive properties. Some research labs claim THC-A is "strongly anti-inflammatory, encourages appetite, is anti-tumor, combats insomnia, and is antispasmodic," making it an effective chemical compound for the treatment of various illnesses. In order to consume these acidic cannabinoids without altering their states, some patients have started turning their medication into a drinkable juice. The downside to juicing cannabis, however, is that a large supply of plant material is necessary in order to produce only small amounts of juice. Juicing marijuana is not a cost-effective method of consumption, especially for the budget conscious patient who has other expenses to worry about, but it is certainly one way to avoid getting "high." 

This information has been brought to you by Marijuana Investor News and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.