Study: Vaporizing Marijuana May Prevent Tobacco/Nicotine Dependence

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

Photo Credit: Medical Jane

A recent letter to the editor/review published in November, 2015 in Addiction, authors discuss evidence suggesting vaporizing cannabis could reduce the chance that a cannabis user will develop tobacco/nicotine dependence. Authors looked at various data points to determine one of the most harmful results of cannabis use stems from the combination of cannabis and tobacco in cannabis cigarettes, which leads to tobacco and nicotine dependence. They claim vaporization could reduce nicotine dependence by eliminating the need to smoke a cannabis and tobacco mixture. Because medical marijuana therapy is gaining popularity and acceptance among patients and the medical community, it is extremely important to find effective vehicles for medicating that reduce the risk of developing harmful dependencies.  

The data points analyzed include: 1) The most common method of cannabis use in Europe include cannabis and tobacco cigarettes. 2) Up to 90% of cannabis smokers have been exposed to tobacco. 3) Cannabis use indicated future nicotine dependence in a sample of Australian adolescents. 4) Tobacco cigarettes could lead to adolescent cannabis use, which could develop into dependence. 5) Only 2 people out of a sample of 96 people admitted to having combined tobacco and cannabis when vaporizing marijuana, o the use of vaporization technology could create a disconnect between cannabis and tobacco use. 6) Global Drug Survey (GDS) data reported only 8% of more than 30,000 cannabis users chose to use vaporizers, but they reported vaporization technology as the best way to prevent harm from cannabis use, and nations with the highest use of vaporization also had the lowest use tobacco and cannabis co-administration.

This information has been provided by Medical Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.