Study: Medical Marijuana Laws Associated with Decreased Obesity

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

According to new data published in the journal Health Economics, the statewide legalization of medical cannabis coincides with an annual reduction in obesity-related medical costs. Researchers at Cornell University and San Diego State University analyzed twelve years of data from the CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System looking for the effects of enacted medical marijuana laws on body weight, physical wellness, and exercise. They discovered medical marijuana laws (MMLs) are associated with a 2% to 6% decline in the probability of obesity. Adults 35 and older who used medical marijuana were associated with increased physical wellness and more frequent exercise. Investigators concluded, "These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that MMLs may be more likely to induce marijuana use for health-related reasons among older individuals, and cause substitution toward lower-calorie recreational 'highs' among younger individuals."

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. Find an abstract of the study here