Yale Study Finds Negative Outcomes for Marijuana Users With PTSD

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

One of the biggest forces behind the medical marijuana movement is allowing veterans who suffer from PTSD access to cannabis, but not everyone supports its use in treating the disorder. In contrast to the anecdotal evidence and a few smaller studies supporting the use of marijuana for PTSD, a recent study from Yale University discovered a link between marijuana use and higher levels of PTSD, alcohol abuse and violent behavior. Researchers analyzed data from 2,276 military veterans who completed specialized Veterans Affairs Treatment programs, and dividing the participants into four groups: "never users" who never used marijuana, "continuing users" who used marijuana before and after treatment, "starters" who used marijuana after treatment, and "stoppers" who stopped the use of marijuana after treatment. Researchers looked at PTSD symptom severity, violence, alcohol abuse, and drug abuse, and found "never users" and "stoppers" had the most positive outcomes with lower levels in all four categories. 

The lead researcher Samuel Wilkinson admitted they did not find a causal relationship between marijuana and PTSD, but he hoped the study would encourage people to use caution before jumping to marijuana for the treatment of PTSD. Many will be quick to make the judgment that this study reveals marijuana is ineffective when it comes to treating PTSD. PTSD is an indication for cannabis use in several states, and with the accumulation of data on such patients through research tools like our CannaBest Medical app for smartphones, perhaps the true answer can be established.

This information is provided by Marijuana Investor News and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.