Study: Patients Report Substituting Cannabis for Booze, Prescription Drugs

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

A new study undertaken at the University of Victoria in British Columbia confirms what many patients have been saying all along: medical cannabis is preferable to prescription medications. The study, which was published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Review, surveyed 473 Canadian adults with legal access to medical cannabis and assessed the influence medical marijuana had on their other drug-taking behaviors.

The report stated, "Substituting cannabis for one or more of alcohol, illicit drugs or prescription drugs was reported by 87 percent of respondents, with 80.3 percent reporting substitution for prescription drugs, 51.7 percent for alcohol, and 32.6 percent for illicit substances." Respondents between the ages of 18-40 displayed the highest rate of substitution, and patients who suffered from pain were most likely to use cannabis over prescription medications.

This study supports the evidence found in other studies conducted in the United States regarding the substitution of cannabis for opioids. Visit The Daily Chronic to read its analysis of this study, or read the abstract from the study, “Substituting cannabis for prescription drugs, alcohol and other substances among medical cannabis patients: The impact of contextual factors,” here.