CBD Improves Quality of Life Measures in Parkinson's Disease Patients, Trial Finds

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology has determined patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease may be able to improve their quality of life and overall well-being with the use of CBD. The double-blind clinical trial, which was conducted by researchers at Brazil’s University of São Paulo, involved 21 patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease without demential or comorbid psychiatric conditions. The patients were separated into three groups, and then given either placebo, 75mg CBD, or 300 mg CBD over the course of six weeks. At five weeks in, researchers tested for motor and general symptoms, well-being and quality of life, and neuroprotective effects. To measure well-being and quality of life, researchers provided patients with the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire, which considers mobility, activities of daily living, emotional well-being, stigma, social support, cognition, communication, and bodily discomfort.

Those receiving the more potent dose displayed significant improvements in quality of life and well-being. There were no major differences in motor symptoms and neuroprotective effects between the different groups after 6 weeks, but researcher explained this may be attributed to the small sample size, the short duration of the study, or the fact that many patients were in the early stages of the disease and so had low baseline scores. The study concludes, “Nowadays, most drugs used in the treatment of [Parkinson’s disease] act in the dopaminergic system and little is known about the role of other neurotransmitter systems in the disease… The endocannabinoid system seems to be an important target of investigation, mostly because of its action in those considered as the non-motor symptoms of [Parkinson’s disease and of reports of its possible neuroprotective effects.”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also access the study here.

Study Links Regular Cannabis Use to Reduced Stress

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

According to researchers from Washington State University, chronic cannabis use is associated with lower stress levels. In the study, which was published in Psychopharmacology, the stress hormone levels between 40 chronic cannabis users and 42 non-users were compared both before and after performing stressful and non-stressful tests. Researchers found regular and heavy cannabis users displayed no difference in salivary cortisol levels when confronting psychologically and physiologically stressful situations and when confronting non-stressful situations. Non-users’ cortisol levels were higher when confronting stressful simulations in comparison to non-stressful scenarios.

Lead author Carrie Cuttler explains, “To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the effects of acute stress on salivary cortisol levels in chronic cannabis users compared to non-users… While we are not at a point where we are comfortable saying whether this muted stress response is a good thing or a bad thing, our work is an important first step in investigating potential therapeutic benefits of cannabis at a time when its use is spreading faster than ever before.”

On testing day, all participants were required to abstain from cannabis use, which is something Cuttler says haven’t been done before. “This study is actually quite novel and new and different from those that have been previously conducted.. There have been studies before that looked at whether people were high or not high,” she said, “but nobody’s looked at sober cannabis users.”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also access the study here.

Smoking Marijuana Doesn’t Lead to Changes in the Hippocampus, Study Finds

 Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

A new study conducted by researchers from the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology has determined the regular use of cannabis by young people does not alter hippocampal volume. Investigators conducted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans at a baseline and a followup around 39 months later in 20 habitual cannabis users and 23 control subjects who did not use cannabis.

The authors explained, “Compared to controls, cannabis users did not show hippocampal volume alterations at either baseline or follow-up. Hippocampal volumes increased over time in both cannabis users and controls, following similar trajectories of increase. Cannabis dose and age of onset of cannabis use did not affect hippocampal volumes… Continued heavy cannabis use did not affect hippocampal neuroanatomical changes in early adulthood. … These data suggest that cannabis users show the same developmental trends as normative samples and that heavy cannabis use in this group may not necessarily interfere with hippocampal changes in neuroanatomy in early adulthood.”

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

42% Of New CBD Users Stop Taking Traditional Medicines

 Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

A survey conducted by Brightfield Group and HelloMD has found 42% of CBD users were able to stop the use of traditional medications, ranging from common Tylenol pain relievers to prescription medications like Vicodin. Other findings included 80% of CBD users found the cannabinoid to be extremely effective, less than 3% found it to be ineffectual or slightly ineffective, and 55% or users were female. The study involved 2400 of HellMD’s members.

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Yet Another Study Finds That Cannabis Use Is Not Independently Linked With IQ Decline

 Photo Credit: NORML

Photo Credit: NORML

Some patients may desire the use of cannabis therapy for symptom management, but may fear its use will have a negative impact. Throughout years of cannabis prohibition, the plant has earned the reputation of harming one’s IQ, but yet another study has come out confirming cannabis does not produce such an impact. Longitudinal data published in the journal Addiction suggests cannabis use by teens is not independently associated with adverse changes in intelligence quotient or executive functioning. Investigators from the U.S. and the U.K. looked at whether or not marijuana use changed neuropsychological performance in a cohort of adolescent twins, and found cannabis use did not negatively impact the adolescent's’ cognitive performance. Rather, there was a negative impact due to “family background factors.”

They explained, “[W]e found that youth who used cannabis … had lower IQ at age 18, but there was little evidence that cannabis use was associated with IQ decline from age 12 to 18. Moreover, although cannabis use was associated with lower IQ and poorer executive functions at age 18, these associations were generally not apparent within pairs of twins from the same family, suggesting that family background factors explain why adolescents who use cannabis perform worse on IQ and executive function tests… Short-term cannabis use in adolescence does not appear to cause IQ decline or impair executive functions, even when cannabis use reaches the level of dependence.”

These findings support previous studies that found cannabis use in adolescence does not have a negative impact on intelligence. This information has been provided by NORML and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.


Evidence Shows CBD Beneficial for Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and Multiple Sclerosis

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

According to new research conducted by a team of Italian researchers and published in CNS & Neurological Disorders - Drug Targets, CBD can provide neuroprotection for patients diagnosed with neurological disorders. In the study, researchers looked through laboratory and clinical findings referencing CBD’s effects on neurological conditions, and while more research is left to be desired, they determined, “Pre-clinical evidence largely shows that CBD can produce beneficial effects in [Alzheimer’s disease], [Parkinson’s disease], and [multiple sclerosis] patients, but its employment for these disorders needs further confirmation from well designed clinical studies.” The review only searched through studies involving CBD alone.

This information supports previous studies that suggest CBD has neuroprotective properties that can inhibit the progression of neurological disorders. Additionally, researchers found pre-clinical evidence suggesting CBD has antiepileptic properties and can be effective and beneficial for those diagnosed with treatment-resistant seizure disorders.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also access the review here.

Cannabis Has Positive Impacts on People With Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis, Study Shows

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study conducted by researcher at Colorado State University suggests cannabis may be able to help manage some of the symptoms associated with multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease, including symptoms pertaining to mood, memory, fatigue, and obesity. The study, which was published in Complementary Therapies in Medicine, involved 595 participants, of which 76% were Parkinson’s disease patients and 24% were multiple sclerosis patients. Over 40% of users were currently treating their symptoms with cannabis, and reported cannabis symptom management efficacy around 6.4 on a scale from 0 to 7. Users reported lower levels of neurological dysfunction and lower levels of disability, specifically in relation to mood, memory, and fatigue. Additionally, 59% said they could reduce their use of prescription medications. Participants were overall younger and less likely to be obese. On the downside, patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis may experience negative impacts on balance.

The researchers used anonymous web-based surveys collecting demographic and cannabis consumption behavioral data, along with information regarding participants’ neurological function, fatigue, balance, and physical activation participation. to compare self-reported assessments of neurological disability among current cannabis users and non-users. They concluded, “Cannabis may have positive impacts on mood, memory, fatigue, and obesity status in people with [Parkinson’s disease] and [multiple sclerosis.” This study supports previously findings that suggest cannabis and cannabinoids help improve symptoms and inhibit progression of both neurological disorders. Still, researchers would like to see more in depth research surrounding the use of cannabis for multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also learn more about the study here.

Cannabinoids Stimulate Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Effects That Are Beneficial For Treating Parkinson's Disease, Study Finds

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new animal trial published in Frontiers in Neuroscience suggests cannabinoids may elicit significant neuroprotection that could inhibit Parkinson’s disease. Researchers from the United Arab Emirates University used six to seven month old rats that had been induced with Parkinson’s, and in one group, administered 50 mg/kg of β-caryophyllene (BCP) daily for four weeks before examining their brains. They found that BCP effectively upregulated the expression of CB2 receptors in comparison with the control group, and produced anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects that help to prevent neurodegeneration. They found that their activation reduced the loss of dopamine-producing neurons and the oxidative stress biomarker malondialdehyde, thus preventing a drop in the antioxidant glutathione. Additionally, CB2 activation augmented the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase, which alleviated the Parkinson’s disease-induced glial cell activation in the striatum.

Researchers concluded, “Taken together, the abrogation of the protective effects… demonstrates the CB2 receptor-dependent mechanism of BCP and the findings can be extrapolated to the neuroprotective properties of CB2 agonism in PD.” These results support the findings of previous studies that have found cannabinoids offer neuroprotection that could benefit Parkinson’s disease. The researchers explain, “In recent years, the cannabinoid receptors, specifically activating CB2 receptors, appear to represent a novel therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases, including [Parkinson’s disease], because of their role in counteracting oxidative stress and inflammation… The CB2 receptors have recently emerged as a potential anti-inflammatory target, to break the self-sustaining cycle of neuroinflammation and preserve neuronal homeostasis, and survival in neurodegenerative disorders.”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also find the full text of the study here.

Best Practices for Using Cannabis Topicals

 Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Cannabis topicals consist of lotions, creams, moisturizers, balms, salves, liniments, or ointments, and offer a method for administering cannabinoids like THC and CBD in a way that doesn’t require smoking or produce psychoactive effects. Topicals are desirable because they offer localized relief that targets the areas that produce aches and pains. To effectively use topicals, it’s important to understand where source of the pain is, as opposed to where the pain is manifesting. For example, a headache may not be produced by the head, but rather by tension in the neck or other parts of the body. It is also important to clean the area before application so that your skin absorbs the beneficial cannabinoids without unwanted bacterias. It is then recommended to apply the topical generously and vigorously and actually massage it into the skin. Then, you can expect to feel subtle relief that may not necessarily cure your aches and pains, but that will make them feel more bearable.

This information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Another Study Has Found Cannabis To Be An Effective Treatment For Chronic Pain

 Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

Researchers from Montreal and Vancouver have confirmed yet again that cannabis is safe and effective at relieving chronic pain. The study involved 215 adults who used medical marijuana for a year, of which 141 were current cannabis users and 58 were ex-consumers, and a control group of 216 patients who didn’t use cannabis at all. Those who received cannabis were given a flower with 12.5% THC and were allowed to consume it however they preferred, with most choosing to inhale or vaporize it. After the year-long study ended, patients who consumed cannabis reported a significant decrease in discomfort and an enhanced quality of life in comparison to the control group. Additionally, cannabis consumers did not experience a greater risk of side effects, and there was no change in cognitive abilities. Cannabis consumers also reported a reduction in anxiety, depression, and fatigue.

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

How Does Cannabis Affect Your Memory? Part 2

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

In our previous post about the relationship between cannabis and memory, we looked at the influence cannabis may have on short-term and long-term memory. Today, we will look at whether or not cannabis can provide any benefits for memory or help patients suffering from disorders that affect memory.

Some studies suggest CBD may not only buffer against THC’s memory impairment, but it may also have the ability to reverse or prevent some cognitive impairments. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) reported CBD reduced alcohol-induced cell death in the brain by 6%, suggesting CBD could help protect the brain from brain damage caused by binge drinking or alcohol abuse. CBD also provide neuroprotective properties that prevent or delay the onset of Parkinson’s dementia, or Alzheimer’s.

For some, the memory impairment caused by THC may not be such a bad thing. For patients suffering from PTSD, cannabis may be able to interfere with the recollection of negative memories associated with traumatic events. Preclinical research has found cannabis containing THC and CBD can “disrupt the reconsolidation of negative memories,” allowing them to forget painful and intrusive memories.

This post concludes our two-part series on marijuana and memory. The information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

How Does Cannabis Affect Your Memory? Part 1.

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

To look at the relationship between cannabis and memory, it’s important to look at its effects on various aspects of memory, including the type of memory, the short-term and long-term influence, and the factors of dosing marijuana, like the cannabinoid composition of the strain, the dosing amount, and the frequency of cannabis use. In this post, we will discuss the effects of cannabis on short-term and long-term memory.

When it comes to short-term effects of cannabis on memory, it seems that the cannabinoids makes it more difficult to form new memories while under the influence and to recall memories while under the influence or shortly after. That said, frequent users may develop a tolerance to these effects, and these effects seem to be temporary. One study found the impairment lasted for two hours after consumption, and no residual effects lasted after 24-48 hours. In regards to long-term memory, frequent and high doses of cannabis may produce adverse effects. A study from JAMA Internal Medicine found people who regularly consumed a lot of cannabis for more than 5 years developed worse verbal recall than people who consumed less or none at all, but not by much. Lead author of the study and professor at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland, Reto Auer, said 3,400 Americans over the course of a 25-year period were involved in the study. When they looked at verbal recall, users who smoked every day could recall 8.5 out of every 15 words, on average, while those who smoked less or didn’t smoke at all recalled 9 out of 15 words.

This information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. Stay tuned for the following post, in which we will discuss how marijuana may actually be beneficial in other aspects of memory and in relation to specific conditions.

Medical Marijuana Research Overview of Restless Legs Syndrome

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) refers to a sensorimotor disorder in which one experiences the uncontrollable and uncomfortable urge to move the legs, and it affects as many as one in ten people in the United States. Because this syndrome is typically worse when sitting or laying down, it coincides with sleep problems, exhaustion, daytime sleepiness, and lower productivity. Treatments for the condition range from moving the affected limbs, taking iron supplements, hot baths, or getting leg massages, to taking anti-seizure medications or dopaminergic agents. However, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke warn long-term use of the medications may worsen the symptoms. More severe cases of RLS may be treated with opioids.

One 2017 study found cannabis completely relieved RLS symptoms in six patients. Five chose to inhale marijuana, while one consumed CBD, to reach remission and complete symptom relief. All six said cannabis treatments greatly improved their quality of sleep. Cannabis also interacts with the endocannabinoid system to modulate the release of dopamine, and these effects have been beneficial at treating the symptoms of other movement disorders like Parkinson’s. Because of this, it could be beneficial in the management of RLS symptoms, since numerous studies support the idea of using dopamine agonist drugs for treating RLS. Lastly, numerous studies show cannabinoids like CBD and THC effectively manage pain and sleep, which are both symptoms that accompany RLS.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

How Cannabidiol (CBD) Works for Treating Anxiety

 Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Various animal studies and human experimental, clinical, and epidemiological studies suggest CBD has powerful anti-anxiety properties, and when administered acutely, it seems both safe and well-tolerated. This suggests the cannabinoid could be helpful for the treatment of panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), social phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and mild to moderate depression. Many pharmaceutical medications known as SSRIs work to target serotonin receptors to reduce anxiety and depression. Like SSRIs, CBD may be able to support signaling through serotonin receptors, and in one animal study, Spanish researchers found CBD enhanced 5-HT1A (a subtype of serotonin receptor) transmission ad affected serotonin faster than SSRIs.

Brain scans of those who suffer from depression or anxiety often show a smaller hippocampus, which is an area of the brain known for its role in memory formation and cognition. Treatments of depression are often associated with neurogenesis within the hippocampus. One animal study found consistent administration of CBD promoted neurogenesis in the hippocampus, suggesting it may help treat anxiety and depression. in a small double-blind study, Brazilian researchers found patients afflicted with generalized social anxiety reported significant decreases in anxiety after CBD consumption. These claims were validated through the support of brain scans that showed cerebral blood flow patters consistent with anti-anxiety effects. Another small study found patients with social anxiety disorders reported less anxiety while performing public speaking tests after the use of CBD. These findings were supported by indicators relating to heart rate and blood pressure.

This information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study: Cannabis Encourages Mitochondrial Function to Inhibit Parkinson's Disease

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new preclinical study suggests THC may induce mitochondrial biogenesis, an effect that could slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease. In the study, which was published in Oncotarget, researchers from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry looked at the neuroprotective properties of THC when administered to human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell models. Their findings suggest THC interacts with proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), or the glitazone receptor, to elicit a chemical reaction that induces mitochondrial biogenesis, restores mitochondrial content, and therefore offers neuroprotection. The researchers even determined THC offered greater neuroprotection than the commonly known PPARγ agonist pioglitazone, which has been known to offer neuroprotective benefits in both animal and cell culture studies of Parkinson’s disease. THC even induced mitochondiral biogensis to reverse deficits, something pioglitazone has not been found to do. This may be because the neuroprotection offered by both compounds are elicited via different pathways. The two compounds offered the greatest neuroprotective effects and greatly reduced neuronal death when working in tandem with each other.

Researchers concluded, “Our data indicate that rather than reducing oxidative stress by PPARγ-regulated expression… THC induces PPARγ-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis whilst pioglitazone, whose protective effect is most likely only partially driven by PPARγ, does not. Indeed our data suggest that Δ9-THC can add to the neuroprotective effect of pioglitazone… THC is generally well tolerated by [Parkinson’s disease] patients and may therefore represent an alternative worthy of consideration… Furthermore, the ability of Δ9-THC to induce mitochondrial biogenesis is interesting as decreased mitochondrial content has been associated with familial as well as sporadic cases of [Parkinson’s disease].”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also find the entire study here.

What Is THCA and What Are the Benefits of This Cannabinoid?

 Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid, or THCA, is an acidic cannabinoid that precedes THC. Unlike THC, THCA is a non-psychoactive compound found in raw cannabis. Through the use of heat to initiate decarboxylation, THCA converts into THC, which does produce psychoactive properties. Although THCA is not as well studied as THC, research is beginning to suggest that THCA may provide significant therapeutic benefits. Preliminary research suggests THCA may provide anti-inflammatory effects, which could benefit a wide range of conditions including arthritis and lupus. It may also contain neuroprotective properties, which could help those suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. THCA may supply anti-emetic properties for nausea or appetite loss, and it may also be anti-proliferative, which is relevant for prostate cancer. Patient testimonies also suggest THCA may provide relief for insomnia, muscle spasms, and pain. This information may provide hope for seeking relief, but there is still much to be desired when it comes to research surrounding THCA and its potential benefits.

This information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Cannabinoids Possess Potential Therapeutic Benefits for Treating Parkinson's Disease, Study Concludes

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

According to a new study published in Molecular Neurodegeneration, medicines derived from cannabis may be able to offer neuroprotection and improve motor symptoms for patient’s suffering from Parkinson’s disease. In the research review, researchers from Konkuk University in South Korea looked through information regarding cannabinoids and Parkinson’s disease, and found evidence that cannabinoids supported neuronal survival and offered neuroprotection through their interactions with the endocannabinoid system’s cannabinoids receptors in the basal ganglia. They were able to do so by stimulating reductions in oxidative injury, excitotoxicity, and calcium influx, and through decreasing inflammation. Additionally, there was evidence cannabinoids helped with neurogenesis, or the generation of new brain neurons. These conclusions have also been determined in small number of preclinical and clinical trials, in which cannabis alleviated the motor dysfunction symptoms that accompany Parkinson’s disease.

Researchers concluded, “Numerous investigations have supported the observation that significant modulation of the cannabinoid signaling system occurs in [Parkinson’s disease]… Therefore, pharmacological modulation of this this system with compounds that selectively target different elements of cannabinoid signaling may improve anomalies of motor behavior and provide neuroprotection.” Researchers added that of all existing Parkinson’s therapies, none alleviate motor disabilities while also supporting neuroprotection. Still, there is a need for more sufficient trials due to the fact most trials have been small scale or pertaining to animal models.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also access the research review here.

Cannabis and Its Impact on High Blood Pressure

 Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Today, we will be discussing what we know about the effects of cannabis on blood pressure. Some studies suggest some cannabis users may experience a mild to moderate dose-dependent increase in blood pressure and heart rate within 10-15 minutes after consumption, followed by a modest hypotensive effect, or drop in blood pressure. As consumption continues, users can develop a tolerance and reduce cannabis’ effects on blood pressure. When it comes to looking at serious adverse risks, one longitudinal study from UC San Francisco regarding coronary artery risk development in young adults (CARDIA) looked at data from 3,617 African American and Caucasian adults over to course of 15 years. In the study, no long-term causal link was established between cannabis consumption and the risk of a heart attack or a stroke. That being said, according to a study conducted by Harvard Medical School, cannabis could actually increase the risk of suffering a heart attack by five times in certain individuals from at-risk populations within an hour after consumption. Within two hours, however, risk returns to normal.

Lastly, because the endocannabinoid system plays a role in regulating cardiovascular function, and because anandamide, which is an endocannabinoid similar to THC, relaxes blood vessels, there is speculation that certain cannabinoids in cannabis may be able to lower blood pressure. Even the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism reported, “endocannabinoids tonically suppress cardiac contractility in hypertension… targeting the endocannabinoid system offers novel therapeutic strategies in the treatment of hypertension.” There are currently no cannabinoid-based or synthetic cannabinoid-based medications approved to treat hypertension.

We hope for further research to better understand cannabis’ relationship to blood pressure through rigorous clinical studies. This information has been sponsored by PureCBDVapors in conjunction with Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Parkinson's Disease Patients Find Cannabis Among Most Beneficial of All Alternative Treatments, Study Finds

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

When it comes to alternative and complementary treatment options, patients suffering from Parkinson’s Disease ranked medical cannabis as the most beneficial for symptom management. Researchers from the University of Denver Anschutz Medical Campus, University of Colorado Denver, and the University of Northern Colorado analyzed responses from self-administered surveys completed by 207 Parkinson’s patients between 2012 and 2013 and published their findings in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. In the survey, 52% of patients reported past or current use of complementary and alternative medicine modalities (CAM). Unfortunately, only 4.3% of those respondents reported using cannabis, but it was still ranked among the most effective of all options. Nine of the 207 patients used cannabis, but five of them said it significantly improved their symptoms without worsening their symptoms or producing negative side effects.

The most commonly used CAM treatments were vitamins, followed by prayer, massage, and relaxation techniques. Cannabis was found to be effective along with massage, art, music, and meditation. Authors explained, “While only a small number of participants in our study reported use of cannabis for PD, those that did reported benefits in mood (56%), sleep (56%), motor symptoms (22%), and quality of life (22%).”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

PTSD, Insomnia, and Cannabis: What’s the Evidence Say?

 Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Many of those who suffer from PTSD may suffer from insomnia as a result of the disorder, and it is said that psychotherapy medications and sleep aids are commonly prescribed to treat PTSD-related insomnia. However, these treatment regimens can produce a wide range of negative side effects. Now, research suggests medical cannabis may be able to provide relief for sleep-related issues without producing the unwanted side effects. According to a study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institute of Health (NIH), and the pharmaceutical company Sanofi-Aventis, consuming THC helped subjects to fall asleep easily and quickly.

Another study headed by Dr. Kenneth Cousens from the Napa State Hospital, California, and Dr. Alberto DiMascio, Director of Psychopharmacology at the Department of Mental Health, Boston State Hospital, suggests medical marijuana not only helps people fall asleep quicker, but that their quality of sleep is better and they are able to stay asleep longer. In addition to research, there is plenty of anecdotal evidence suggesting medical cannabis is much more preferable to the various combinations of medications that the VA currently relies on to treat the problems associated with PTSD.

This information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.