Marijuana and Alzheimer’s Disease Part 2

Photo Credit: MaxPixel (https://bit.ly/2lOZd9V).

Photo Credit: MaxPixel (https://bit.ly/2lOZd9V).

In our previous post, we introduced our discussion surrounding the use of cannabis for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and provided an overview of how its cannabinoids could help patients with the condition. To follow that post, we will look into how specific cannabinoids may be able to help with the condition.

One study from 2012 using a synthetic cannabinoid found the cannabinoid protected brain cells from beta-amyloid plaques and improved memory in a rodent model of Alzheimer’s disease. Although the study involved a synthetic cannabinoid, the cannabinoid interacted with cannabinoid receptors as natural cannabinoids would. Additionally, a study using human nerve cells found THC supported the removal of beta-amyloid from the cells. It also reduced inflammation and prevented nerve damage. Another study found THC blocked acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme which helps produce beta-amyloid plaques. Aside from memory and cognition impairments, marijuana may be able to help relieve other symptoms like behavioral issues, irritability, and aggression. A study from 1997 found THC reduced behavioral issues and increased appetite in patients with Alzheimer’s. Another trial involving 11 patients and published in 2016 found cannabis oil, when added to treatment regimens, helped Alzheimer’s patients with delusions, aggression, irritability, apathy, and sleep.

CBD, on the other hand, may help patients in ways that THC cannot. CBD may be able to reduce symptoms of psychosis and anxiety, and so may be better at treating psychiatric symptoms than THC which could exacerbate these symptoms. Another study from 2014 which was published in the journal Psychopharmacology found regular administration of CBD could also improve memory deficits, and reversed cognitive deficits in animal models of Alzheimer’s. CBD also reduced proteins contributing to the production of beta-amyloid plaques. A 2011 study found CBD contributed to neurogenesis, or the growth of new brain cells, in the hippocampus, which is the area of the brain which regulates memory and is damaged by Alzheimer’s.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana and Alzheimer’s Disease Part 1

Photo Credit: MaxPixel (https://bit.ly/2lOZd9V).

Photo Credit: MaxPixel (https://bit.ly/2lOZd9V).

Areas of the brain responsible for controlling memory are regulated by the endocnannabinoid system, leading researchers to hypothesize cannabinoids found in cannabis may be able to help those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. As Alzheimer’s develops, beta-amyloid plaques block and disrupt the endocannabinoid system, which could be responsible for producing the early symptoms of memory impairments. Because cannabis is known to interact with this system and resolve endocannabinoid deficiencies, it could resolve these issues. Cannabinoids not only interact with this system, but also contain neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects that could benefit those with the condition. Studies have found cannabinoids protect brain cells from damage and prevent disruptions in cognition in animal models of Alzheimer’s. Cannabis’ anti-inflammatory properties could prevent inflammation from damaging neurons and contributing to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s patients, and one study from 2009 confirmed cannabinoids helped to regulate inflammation in the brain.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. In our next post, we will discuss how specific cannabinoids like THC and CBD could be useful in treating the condition.

Marijuana and Depression

Photo Credit: Pixabay (https://bit.ly/2Sx8ZIm)

Photo Credit: Pixabay (https://bit.ly/2Sx8ZIm)

Depression is one of the most common mental health disorders, with symptoms of feeling sad, low energy, lack of motivation, difficulty concentrating, and irritability. Now, evidence is beginning to suggest medical cannabis could be a powerful player in targeting the condition. Although clinical trials are lacking, the research that does exist is hopeful. One study from 2009 found activating the CB1 receptor produces antidepressant effects in animals, and another animal trial from 2007 found cannabis could act as an antidepressant by increasing the production of and activating serotonin in the brain. Medical marijuana may even work alongside conventional antidepressant medications for enhanced relief.

When administered in the optimal dose THC has been effective as an antidepressant in animals, but in the wrong dose it could actually make depression worse. Another study found over time, THC increased BDNF, a protein that is deficient in those who suffer from depression. Additionally, CBD could produce fast-acting antidepressant effects. One study from 2014 found CBD was effective at treating depression in animals, and two years later, a study found CBD activated the endocannabinoid system and the serotonin systems to produce antidepressant effects. Specifically, CBD was able to treat symptoms associated with depression like anhedonia, which prevents people from feeling pleasure.

Those who choose to use medical marijuana for the treatment of depression should use caution due to the fact that marijuana could exacerbate symptoms if not used in the proper dose. Some studies suggest cannabis use could increase the risk of developing depression, however the causation and correlation relationship remains unknown. Youth who use marijuana frequently seem especially at risk of developing depression. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana Tolerance: How It Works

Photo Credit: MaxPixel (https://bit.ly/2m5zKJo).

Photo Credit: MaxPixel (https://bit.ly/2m5zKJo).

Medical marijuana therapy can be a powerful tool in treating a wide variety of symptoms, but over time, can patients develop a tolerance to the therapy and thereby render it ineffective? For chronic users, marijuana may lose its potency over time, requiring users to use larger doses to experience the same effect. As with all medications, a tolerance is developed through a neurological process called downregulation, and over time, the brain reduces the number of receptors, in this case CB1 receptors, that are available to a particular substance in an attempt to maintain homeostasis.

Just as tolerance can be developed, however, tolerance can also be reduced. One study from 2016 looked at the PET scans of 18-35 year old men and found that two days of abstinence from cannabis was enough to increase CB1 receptor activity. After 28 days, the CB1 receptor activity had returned to normal, and the tolerance was lost. However, stopping marijuana use can also result in some minor withdrawal symptoms, including anxiety, irritability, sleeplessness, cravings, and boredom. Although a patient’s use is determined by the need for symptom relief or combatting specific conditions, if possible, infrequent cannabis use could be helpful in avoiding the development of a cannabis tolerance.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana for the Treatment of PTSD

Photo Credit:  Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Dr. Valerie Rice ( https://bit.ly/2FAxBtt).

Photo Credit: Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Dr. Valerie Rice (https://bit.ly/2FAxBtt).

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental health disorder that develops as a result of experiencing or witnessing a traumatic event. Common symptoms include intrusive unwanted thoughts, avoidance of potential triggers, negative thoughts like fear, anger, shame, and horror, and hypervigilance and irritability. Many physicians and researchers believe medical marijuana could be helpful in treating the symptoms associated with PTSD, and that it could serve as a substitute for the powerful and potentially dangerous pharmaceutical medications that are currently used for its treatment. In fact, marijuana use among those with PTSD is already common, suggesting it may be helping patients cope with the condition. Research is lacking, but the Multidisciplinary Association for Pyschadelic Studies (MAPS) has begun a clinical trial looking into the use of cannabis for PTSD, and the study will look at the safety and efficacy of different strengths of cannabis for use by PTSD patients. Researchers also theorize cannabis may help those with PTSD because it already is known to treat many symptoms that coincide with the condition, like the loss in quality of sleep, anxiety, and protecting against fear memory.

While cannabis is mostly thought to help those with PTSD, some fear it could make symptoms worse. The treatment of anxiety with cannabis is complex, and certain strains of cannabis, especially those containing high levels of THC, could make anxiety worse and thereby make the symptoms of PTSD worse. Some fear marijuana only serves as an emotional crutch, and may prevent sufferers from finding healthy ways of coping with their disorder. The cannabinoid content is responsible for whether or not cannabis use could be successful or not, but understanding these effects is not so simple. THC may be able to help those with PTSD by inducing sleep, but it could making symptoms worse by producing paranoia and anxiety. CBD could help in this by balancing out the effects of THC, while also acting as an anti-anxiety and antipsychotic medication.

Cannabis in conjunction with pyschotherapy could be a powerful team in the treatment of PTSD. This information has been provided by Leafly and approve by our Chief Medical Officer.

Is More CBD Better? The Science Behind CBD Dosing for Anxiety and Other Conditions

Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

Cannabidiol (CBD) is famed for its ability to fight epilepsy and buffer against the side effects of THC, among other things. So the question begs to be asked - is more CBD necessarily better? In short, no, and like most medications, the efficacy medical marijuana is dependent on a variety of factors including its dosage. This is known as the “inverted-U” effect, and it’s not uncommon among medications that, like CBD, affect multiple brain receptors. Of published toxicology articles, 37% report a degree of inverted-U responses, which reflects differential drug effects on the brain. CBD is applicable for a wide spectrum of treatments, including pain, anxiety, PTSD, and more, suggesting it has a plethora of brain and body targets.

At low doses, CBD can prevent endocannabinoids and phytocannabinoids from binding with receptors in the nervous system, which may be why it is effective at blocking some of the side effects produced by THC. Additionally, low to moderate doses of CBD are more effective at treating anxiety, as was suggested in one animal study from 1990 where CBD became less effective as an anti-anxiety medication as the dosage increased. These results were supported by human trials, in which low to moderate doses of CBD eased the stresses of social anxiety disorder and public speaking. CBD treats anxiety at about 25% of the amount required to treat epilepsy, showing CBD is effective at much higher doses for this condition.

This is why titrating CBD is essential in determining the perfect amount to experience symptom relief, and our app can help. Journaling daily on our app allows you to keep track of how you’re dosing so you can understand which aspects of your regimen are working, and which aspects of your regimen are not. This information has been provided in part by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This post does not represent an endorsement on behalf of Leafly for CannaBest Medical.

What Are The Best Marijuana Strains For Anxiety?

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Photo Credit: NicePik (https://bit.ly/2kp1Df4)

Treating anxiety with medical marijuana can be a complex process, and it comes down to the composition of a strain’s cannabinoids and terpenes that determine whether or not the plant will ease or exacerbate symptoms. While there isn’t a ton of research on medical marijuana for anxiety, the research that does exist has been positive. One study from 2017 found 40% of patients who used medical marijuana were able to ween off of their benzodiazepine anxiety medications.

Many suggest Indica strains, which tend to be more calming, are better at relieving anxiety symptoms, but to better understand which strains provide the best relief it is helpful to understand the precise cannabinoid and terpenoid makeup of the strain. When you understand the makeup of a strain, look for high-CBD strains for anxiety relief and avoid THC, which can actually produce feelings of anxiety and paranoia. CBD has been shown to counteract social anxiety disorder. Additionally, CBD can buffer against the side effects of THC, so that users can experience the relaxation and sedation that THC offers without experiencing the paranoia or anxiety it might induce. On the terpenoid end of the spectrum, researchers point to Myrcene as having the most powerful sedative anti-anxiety properties, but other terpenes that could help include linalool, beta-caryophyllene, and terpinolene.

When you begin to titrate your medical marijuana dosing regimen in the search for better relief, our app can guide the way. Document your regimen daily, and you’ll discover which changes are beneficial to your routine and which should be avoided. In turn, this information can be collected anonymously to help others determine a starting place in their own search for symptom relief. This information has been provided partially by Leaf Science. This post does not represent an endorsement on behalf of Leaf Science for CannaBest Medical.

What Is THCA Crystalline?

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Photo Credit: ▒░ TORLEY ░▒▓ / Flickr (https://bit.ly/2lyRAE6)

THCA is tetrahydrocannabinolic acid, the acidic form of THC, and it is usually found in raw and live cannabis before the plant is exposed to heat. Unlike THC, THCA is non-psychoactive, so it won’t produce the feelings of getting high. THCA crystalline is produced when THCA is isolated from the cannabis plant and broken down into a powder. THCA can help target an endocannabinoid deficiency, but to reap the benefits of THCA, you’ll have to juice or eat cannabis in its raw form. Some tout THCA for having strong anti-inflammatory effects, while others claim the cannabinoid can fight migraines, irritable bowel syndrome, and epilepsy. Unfortunately, research surrounding the cannabinoid is limited, and only one study has found the cannabinoid reduced nausea and vomiting in rats.

This information has been provided by High Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Is CBDV (Cannabidivarin) And What Does It Do?

Photo Credit: High Times

Photo Credit: High Times

There are over 100 known cannabinoids in cannabis, but many are only familiar with the well-known cannabinoids like cannabidiol or tetrahydrocannabinol. One lesser known cannabinoid is cannabidivarin (CBDV), a non-psychoactive cannabinoid that acts as an antiemetic and anticonvulsant. The cannabinoid is similar structurally to CBD, and like CBD, it may be able to help treat those who suffer from epilepsy and nausea. One study from 2013 found CBDV significantly reduced chemically-induced seizures. Another study from 2014 found the cannabinoid interactive with receptors responsible for detecting and regulating body temperatures and producing pain sensations. The Italian research team also noted CBDV reduced the duration and strength of simulated epileptic seizures in the brains of rats. Lastly, a study from 2013 published in the British Journal of Pharmacology found CBDV may have interacted with CCB1 receptors to reduce nausea in rats. The pharmaceutical company GW Pharmaceuticals is currently conducting clinical trials researching the use of CBDV.

This information has been provided by High Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

New Study Says Marijuana Does Not Reduce Fertility In Men Or Women

Photo Credit: Mohamed Hassan / Pxhere (https://bit.ly/30HNrxx)

Photo Credit: Mohamed Hassan / Pxhere (https://bit.ly/30HNrxx)

For those who want to use cannabis but fear it could interfere with chances of conception can now rest assured. A study out of Boston University School of Public Health analyzed the link between cannabis use and fertility, and found it does not lower the chances of conceiving for neither men nor women. In the study, researchers used surveys to measure fecundability in approximately 4,000 women between the ages of 21 and 45 who were in stable relationships and did not use contraception or fertility treatments. Additionally, 1,000 of their male partners enrolled in the study. Over the four year study, 12% of the women and 14% of the men used cannabis. Researchers followed up with couples 12 times throughout the study, and found the chance of conception was similar between groups who used cannabis and groups who didn’t. More substantial clinical research is left to be desired.

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study Finds Epilepsy Patients Feel Better After Daily CBD Regimen

Photo Credit: Leafly

Photo Credit: Leafly

According to a new study funded by the state of Alabama, patients in Alabama with intractable epilepsy felt better overall within one year of beginning CBD therapy even in the face of declining social support and stressful events. Although lead researcher Barbara Hansen did admit she cannot definitively point to CBD as the agent producing relief, she did confirm each patient in the study was administered CBD. In this open-label study, researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham distributed 100 mg/ml CBD solutions to patients. The study involved a range of participants aged 1-63 years old, and it took place for just over two years between the years of 2015 and 2017.

Participants initially started with doses of 5mg of this solution for every kg of their weight on a daily basis, divided into two spoonfuls. Every two weeks they had the opportunity to increase their dose by 5 mg, with a maximum at 50 mg/kg a day. They then were asked to complete the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List, and a measure from a 0-1 scale perception of their overall health. One year later, 77.4% of participants reported good feelings, compared to 73.3% at the beginning. Overall, patients reported .2-3 points of decline in their ISEL scores despite reporting an average of .29 increase in stressful events. Children witnessed a decrease in stressful events by .86. Some patients withdrew from the study before their followup surveys, and although the study began with 135, the data collected came from only 62 patients who continued in the study. This study will continue.

This information has been provided by Leafly and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Medical Marijuana For Children With Cancer Broadly Supported By Doctors

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Photo Credit: 7raysmarketing (pixabay.com)

According to a survey of pediatric oncologists which was published in the journal Pediatrics, 85% of physicians who were certified to prescribe medical marijuana were willing to help children with cancer access the medication. Additionally, 95% those who were not eligible to provide the medication supported medical marijuana access for pediatric cancer patients. The survey was sent to 654 doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, psychologists, social workers and registered nurses who care primarily for children with cancer at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and Seattle Children’s Hospital Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. Of the 288 who responded, a third were certified to prescribe medical marijuana. Physicians were less likely to support smoking marijuana (57%) than they were to support oral formulations (89%) for administering the medication, and 93% were interested in more advanced clinical trials investigating these uses. Physicians were more likely to support the use of medical marijuana in patients as their conditions advanced.

Of the respondents, 3 in 10 providers who were asked for medical marijuana at least once in the previous month were asked to prescribe it for nausea and vomiting (79%), and half of those requests additionally wanted to manage loss of appetite (52%). A quarter of patients wanted medical marijuana for pain management (26%), or for the management of depression and anxiety. While only 8% of providers recommended medical marijuana to patients in practice, 92% still said they would be willing to help children with cancer get the medication and approve of its use for treating children’s symptoms. Nearly half of providers cited the biggest obstacle in providing medical marijuana to pediatric cancer patients as not having standard medical marijuana formulations, dosages, or strength. Authors explained, “Given burgeoning interest in medical marijuana, especially in oncology care, it is critical that providers who are routinely approached for access to medical marijuana possess baseline knowledge on regulations, known benefits and harm… Randomized clinical trials using such MM [medical marijuana] formulations for supportive care in children with cancer are needed to better understand the therapeutic potential.”

This information has been provided by Forbes and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Is CBN (Cannabinol) And What Does It Do?

Photo Credit: High Times

Photo Credit: High Times

You may not have heard of cannabinol (CBN), since it’s hardly present in cannabis flowers and does not have as potent of an effect as THC. This weaker potency, however, could be desirable to those who want the benefits of THC without the psychoactive effects. Cannabinol has been touted as one of the most sedative cannabinoids that can be found in cannabis, inducing body relaxation and making users sleepier. Researchers also found that CBD stimulated appetite in rats, allowing them to eat sooner, larger amounts, and for longer durations of time. Another study from 2006 found CBN, as well as several other cannabinoids, could control the growth of cancer cells, and was especially effective at targeting Lewis carcinoma. The cannabinoid also has minor anticonvulsant properties, and can activate the same pain pathways as THC. Cannabinol may slow the onset of ALS, and its antibacterial properties allow it to target MRSA. As a topical, cannabinol may also be effective in treating various skin conditions.

Although CBN is not a powerful psychoactive compound, some studies have found the cannabinoid, when combined with THC, will exacerbate its effects. One study found CBN increases the psychological and physiological effects of THC. This information is controversial, however, and other studies have claimed CBN provided no significant difference in psychoactive effects than THC alone. Still, those who are not looking for any psychoactive effects may want to avoid strains containing high concentrations of these cannabinoids.

To learn more about cannabinol or to discover where to find products containing high concentrations of cannabinol, check out the original post on High Times. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Marijuana and the Entourage Effect

Photo Credit: MaxPixel

Photo Credit: MaxPixel

Marijuana has a plethora of cannabinoids and terpenes, and while they’re known to have their own unique medicinal benefits when isolated, it’s when they work together that something truly amazing happens. For example, the two most well-known cannabinoids, THC and CBD, work to balance each other, so that CBD can reduce any negative side effects that THC might cause while boosting its positive outcomes. CBD has been show to counteract some of the negatives associated with marijuana, like tachycardia, sedation, intoxication, and other psychoactive effects.

Terpenes, which are the cannabis compounds responsible for the scent and flavor of marijuana, can also play a powerful role in the entourage effect. These chemicals can actually morph how cannabinoids bind to their receptors, and in doing so alter the effects that are produced. On their own, terpenes can affect sedation, pain relief, and provide antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antidepressant, and anti-anxiety effects. When working alongside cannabinoids, however, terpenes could work in tandem to treat acne, MRSA infections, and psychiatric illnesses.

In recent years, pharmaceutical companies have dedicated more time researching the combination of different cannabinoids rather than isolating them, pointing to the powerful effects that whole plant cannabis can offer. It is important to understand what cannabinoid and terpenoid combinations can produce the most effective relief for your symptoms, and our app can help! Remember to document your regimen daily in order to monitor which dose works best. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This post does not represent an endorsement on behalf of Leaf Science.

Study: Marijuana Use Not Linked With Reduced Motivation in Adolescents

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

When considering medical marijuana therapy for their children, parents may be concerned about the side effects marijuana has on adolescent brain development and behaviors. Now, a study conducted by a team of researchers from Florida International University could ease these fears. In the study, which was published in the journal Substance Use & Misuse, researchers looked at the relationship between cannabis use and motivation among 79 adolescent subjects who were either long-term regular cannabis consumers or occasional users. They then looked at motivational tendencies using the Apathy Evaluation Scale and the Motivation and Engagement Scale, and found neither occasional nor heavy marijuana use was linked with a decrease in motivation.

The authors concluded, “After controlling for confounds, no significant differences were observed between regular and light users on any motivation index. Similarly, no associations between motivation and lifetime or past 30-day cannabis use amount were observed… Our findings do not support a link between reduced motivation and CU (cannabis use) among adolescents after controlling for relevant confounds.”

This information is provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study: Marijuana Use Not Linked With Reduced Motivation

Photo Credit: NORML

Photo Credit: NORML

A new study published in the journal Substance Use & Misuse suggests neither occasional nor heavy marijuana use by adolescents decreases motivation. Researchers from the Florida International University looked at cannabis use and motivation in 79 adolescents who were both long-term regular and occasional users. The investigators looked at motivational tendencies using the Apathy Evaluation Scale and the Motivation and Engagement scale, and found, “After controlling for confounds, no significant differences were observed between regular and light users on any motivation index. Similarly, no associations between motivation and lifetime or past 30-day cannabis use amount were observed… Our findings do not support a link between reduced motivation and CU among adolescents after controlling for relevant confounds.”

This information has been provided by NORML and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Does Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) Get You High?

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

Following up on our post discussing the benefits of the cannabinoid THCV, some might want to know how severe its psychoactive effects are. THCV does produce psychoactive and physiological effects, but these effects differ from the effects most people have come to understand produced by THC. Although everyone may experience a different reaction, THCV is generally thought to provide a stimulating, clear-headed buzz as well as mental energy. THCV intensifies the cerebral euphoria caused by THC, which could end up causing anxiety in some users. At the same time, however, THCV may have the ability to counteract the negative effects of THC, like paranoia, impaired short-term memory, and increased heart rate. Unlike THC, the side effects of THCV do not produce increased appetite. Instead, it is an appetite suppressant. The onset of THCV’s psychoactive effects is quicker than that of THC, but it only lasts half as long.

Patients who want to avoid psychoactive effects altogether may want to steer clear of THCV. For those who would like to experience the benefits discussed in the previous post may want to titrate strains containing THCV into their dose, beginning with low doses, so that they can understand how the cannabinoid affects their body. Our app can help, and by journaling daily you can document the experience of your new dosing regimen to monitor what works and what doesn’t, so you can discover optimal relief. This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. This post does not represent an endorsement on behalf of Civilized for CannaBest Medical.


What Are the Benefits of Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV)?

Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

The cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) is a psychoactive and stimulating compound that may offer a wide variety of benefits. THCV may be able to help those with anxiety, especially when it comes to counteracting the mental stress brought on by the cannabinoid THC. THCV has been known to help relieve panic attacks and treat PTSD without affecting emotions. THCV may also promote bone cell growth and bone health, which means it could be beneficial for those suffering from osteoporosis or other similar conditions. Because THCV is an antioxidant, it could provide neuroprotective benefits that would help those with Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. THCV’s ability to suppress the appetite make it ideal for those trying to lose weight, so those trying to stimulate appetite should avoid the strains containing too much THCV. Patients with diabetes may want to find strains with THCV because it regulates blood sugar levels and reduces insulin resistance. Lastly, early research has shown THCV has the potential to improve motor control, reduce tremors, and lessen the damage from brain lesions caused by Alzheimer’s.

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study Determines CBD is Effective as Adjunctive Therapy for Psychosis

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Clinical trial data published in The American Journal of Psychiatry suggests patients who suffer from schizophrenia could manage their psychotic symptoms better through the addition of CBD therapy on a daily basis. In the randomized trial, British researchers compared the addition of 1000 mg of CBD to the addition of placebo in 88 patients’ conventional therapy regimens over the course of six weeks. At the end of the trial, researchers say those who received CBD “had lower levels of positive psychotic symptoms and were more likely to have been rated as improved and as not severely unwell by the treating clinician.” CBD also improved cognitive performance and overall functioning in patients, but these results were not significant statistically. Authors conclude, “These findings suggest that CBD has beneficial effects in patients with schizophrenia… As CBD’s effects do not appear to depend on dopamine receptor antagonism, this agent may represent a new class of treatment for the disorder.”

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

What Are The Medical Benefits of CBD? - Part 3

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Photo Credit: NeedPix (https://bit.ly/2XK0i4H)

Let’s continue our discussion of which conditions could benefit from CBD treatment by beginning with strokes. One animal study found CBD reduced two types of brain damage caused by a stroke, so much so that the outcomes of the group which had the stroke were comparable to the control group that did not. Its neuroprotective properties may help prevent brain damage and help patients heal. When administered before trauma, CBD can also protect against the damage caused by spinal cord injury, and aid in the healing process. Because of its neuroprotective effects, CBD may also be beneficial for those with traumatic brain injury, and studies suggest the cannabinoid protects neurons following injury, reduces the formation of scar tissue, and regenerates neuronal axons. CBD may also treat nicotine addiction, and in one study involving 24 smokers, some smokers received a placebo inhaler while some received a placebo inhaler. Smokers were instructed to use the inhaler when cigarette cravings struck. Those who received the placebo did no reduce their cigarette usage, while those who received CBD reduced their use by 40%.

The medication Sativex, which contains equal parts CBD and THC, has been found to effectively lower scores of spasticity related symptoms in patients with moderate to severe Multiple Sclerosis, even when these patients were previously treatment-resistant. CBD also reduced the production of cytokines, and activated an important biological pathway blocked by multiple sclerosis. Sativex may also help those with ADHD. CBD was also found to improve social interaction and reduce hyperactivity in rats with ADHD. CBD may also promote wakefulness in those who suffer from sleep disorders that cause excessive sleep. CBD also improved the quality of sleep in young patients who suffered from PTSD. CBD may also help patients heal from liver disease. One study found CBD reduces the neurological damage and cognitive impairments caused by toxins that remain in the blood as a result of liver failure. CBD also restored liver and brain function. Lastly, when taken before and after surgery, CBD increased the success rates of bone marrow transplants, and patients who received CBD were less likely to develop graft versus host disease.

This concludes our series examining the many uses for CBD. This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.