Study: Medical Cannabis Patients Report Decreased Use of Opioids, Anti-Anxiety Medicines

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

New self-reported data published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology reveals patients who have access to medical marijuana decrease their use of opioids, anti-depressants, anti-anxiety drugs, and other medications. Investigators out of five states looked at the medical history of 1,500 patient-members of state-licensed dispensaries in the northeast and found 77% of respondents reduced their use of opioids after beginning cannabis therapy. Many respondents also decreased their use of anti-anxiety medications (72%), migraine-related medications (67%), sleep aids (65%), and anti-depressants (38%). Additionally, 42% of respondents reduced their use of alcohol. The findings of this study support the findings of previous studies regarding the effects of cannabis on opioids and other prescription medications.

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Researchers Link Cannabis Topicals to Healing Wounds

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Cannabis topicals are already known to reduce pain, inflammation, and skin infections, but now researchers have linked the vehicle to reducing the spread of aggressive injuries and wounds. Scientists recently published a report in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management that revealed cannabis topicals effectively addressed destructive, disease-related wounds. They specifically noted its use by a 44-year-old Canadian patients who treated wounds from oral cancer with cannabis topicals. After attempting different forms of treatment, a hole formed in the patients cheek. After being prescribed cannabis oil and applying it topically onto the wound four times a day for one month, the patient noticed the wound in his cheek not only stopped growing, but actually decreased in size. He noted pain relief lasted for a duration of two hours after applying the oil.

Those who want to limit the psychoactive effects that can coincide with cannabis treatment may prefer the use of cannabis topicals. Both CB1 and CB2 receptors are present in the skin, hair, and sweat glands, so the medicine can be applied to specific target areas without cerebral stimulation. This makes the method highly suitable for the elderly, children, and others who may be sensitive to the effects of cannabis. This information has been partially provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.  

If you are interested in experimenting with cannabis topicals, remember to document your routine on a daily basis in the journaling section of our app so that you can discover the dosing regimen that works best for your symptoms. 

What is CBD Oil?

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

CBD oil is high in CBD and lacks any significant amounts of THC, sometimes containing no THC at all. It has gained popularity in recent years for its ability to provide therapeutic relief without producing any psychoactive side effects. Despite that, there are still inconsistent laws surrounding the oil at both state and federal levels. CBD can alleviate a multitude of conditions, from relieving social anxiety to slowing the progression of cancer. The cannabinoid is most well known for its ability to treat pediatric epilepsy even in the most treatment resistant forms, and pharmaceuticals have harnessed its power for treating Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome. High concentrations of CBD come in a variety of forms, including oils, e-liquids, tinctures, topicals, strains, and homemade extracts. 

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis Treatments for PTSD in Non-veterans

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Of the studies involving cannabis and PTSD, most focus on PTSD associated with military veterans affected by combat-related stress and anxiety, but cannabis can also be effective in treating PTSD stemming from other traumas as well. A Brown University study suggests ordinary citizens with PTSD garner less attention, care, and treatment from medical institutions in comparison to military groups suffering the same symptoms, but this might be because developing long-term problems during the progression of the condition can be more difficult to treat. Authors of the study state, "A major finding of the authors’ search for nonmilitary service providers is that there is no centralized listing of PTSD providers, treatment programs, and support programs at the state or local level and limited listings at the federal level."

Access to cannabis could be helpful for these patients suffering PTSD because it is capable in treating the four types of PTSD symptoms that classify the condition, which includes intrusion, avoidance, negative alterations in cognition and mood, and alterations in arousal and reactivity. The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) released a report detailing the link between endocannabinoid deficiency and PTSD. Cannabis can fill the void of insufficient endocannabinoids within the body, which results in relief from painful memories and supports coping mechanisms. Researchers have found equal parts THC and CBD are effective in treating self-esteem issues stemming from PTSD, and smoking or vaping is reported as preferable for immediate relief from PTSD symptoms.

This information is provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Marijuana Allows 45% of Pain and Anxiety Patients to Eliminate Use of Prescription Pill, Study Finds

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

A new observational study involving 146 patients and conducted by Canada's Canabo Medical Inc. has found medical cannabis causes a drop in reliance on benzodiazepine for anxiety and pain patients. In the study, 40% of patients who used medical cannabis for pain and/or anxiety eliminated the use of benzodiazepines within 90 days, and after a years time the number increased to 45%. The majority of patients, at 61.3%, were using benzodiazepines to treat pain conditions. Another 27.4% used the prescription to treat anxiety, and 11.3% used the medications to treat neurological conditions.

Lead researcher Dr. Neil Smith explains, “We wanted to take a close look at the likelihood of continued benzodiazepine usage after commencing medical cannabis treatments and, to be perfect honest, the results are extremely promising... When conducting this type of research, experts are typically encouraged by an efficacy rate in the neighborhood of 10 percent. To see 45 percent effectiveness demonstrates that the medical cannabis industry is at a real watershed moment.” This study is significant in that cannabis, which has a high safety profile and lacks risk of addiction, may be able to stand in for benzodiazepines, which produce dizziness, headaches, memory impairment, and have the potential for abuse. In 2013, 30% of prescription pill overdoses were related to benzodiazepines. Cannabis can be a safe and effective alternative treatment for pain and anxiety. 

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis a Potential Treatment for Crack Cocaine Disorders, Study Suggests

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Through the many studies analyzing the use of medical marijuana for pain management, researchers have found cannabis effectively reduces the use of opioids and subsequently fights the harmful side effects of addiction. Now, a new study suggests this fight against addiction can extend to other substances like crack cocaine, saying intentional use of cannabis can help those with crack cocaine disorders and reduce their frequency of crack use. The study, which was led by Dr. M-J Milloy from the University of British Columbia's St. Paul's Hospital and published in Addictive Behaviors, looked at the use of cannabis on the frequency of crack cocaine use among those who abused the substance. During periods of intentional cannabis use, the frequency of crack cocaine use among participants decreased.

Researchers used data from three prospective Vancouver-based cohort studies between 2012 and 2015 and adjusted analyses to compare use before, during, and after intentional cannabis use. They found crack use was significantly lower after periods of cannabis use than before, but during these periods, use was not significantly different. Following these periods, cannabis use remained higher when compared to before these periods, but use was lower than within these intentional use periods. An earlier study found cannabis reduced cravings and helped cease the use of crack in 68% of abusers.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. Text of the study can be accessed here

Benefits of Using a Vaporizer

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Methods for administering medical marijuana have expanded exponentially, and each method can be beneficial for targeting specific symptoms in their own unique ways. For those who want to inhale medical marijuana, vaporizing the medication may be a healthier method than smoking, and it has its own unique benefits associated with the vehicle. Because this method heats cannabis just below the point of combustion, it is able to release active compounds of the medication without producing toxins, carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and other harmful byproducts. One study from 2007 found a tabletop vaporizer was as potent as smoking, but without releasing carbon monoxide or producing adverse side effects. Vaporizing also is easier on the lungs, and in 2010 researchers found those who switched from smoking to vaporizing experienced "meaningful improvements in respiratory function" within a month. 

Vaporizers available today offer users an efficient dosing method by heating cannabis quickly to precise temperatures, using digital controls and single-button operating systems, offering retractable mouthpieces, and providing haptic feedback notifications and smartphone app compatibility. Vaporizers can also work on wax concentrates, which are able to provide more potent relief. Because vaporizers produce pure, potent vapor only when you actively use the technology, the lifespan of wax and dry herb are extended through efficient use and never wasted. Some users claim vaporizers produce more flavorful notes while eliminating pungent and strong smells, making this vehicle both enjoyable and discrete. Lastly, vaporizers can be extremely compact and portable for those who need to medicate on the go.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana, Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.  

Cannabis Pain Patches For Fibromyalgia And Nerve Pain

Photo Credit: HERB

Photo Credit: HERB

Cannabis patches are now being used to treat fibromyalgia and reduce diabetic nerve pain. Fibromyalgia and diabetes often produce painful tingling sensations, and in a 2014 survey from the National Pain Foundation, cannabis was reported as the most effective analgesic for fibromyalgia patients who were willing to try medical cannabis. The patients who tried medical marijuana reported it as being more effective than traditional medications like Savella, Cymbalta, and Lyrica. A human trial involving 16 diabetic patients with foot neuropathy found medical marijuana provided dose-dependent relief for pain. Similar results have been noticed with in those who suffer from multiple sclerosis.

Patients already have access to cannabis pharmaceuticals, topical creams, and oral options, but now companies like Cannabis Science, Inc. are developing pain patches to deliver transdermal therapy that enters the bloodstream through the skin. They are currently creating different patches targeting both diabetic neuropathy and fibromyalgia. Mary's Medicinals also offer patches containing variations in cannabinoids. 

This information has been provided by Herb and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

What is THCA (Tetrahydrocannabinolic Acid)?

Photo Credit: Kojin/Shutterstock

Photo Credit: Kojin/Shutterstock

Tetrahydrocannabinolic Acid (THCA) is the molecular precursor to THC. THCA is non-psychoactive, and must be converted to THC through a heated process called decarboxylation before it will provide any sort of "high." This is because while THCA contains a carboxylic acid group that is absent in THC, which actually prevents it from binding with the CB1 receptor in the brain. In order to consume THCA, a patient must avoid the use of heat in order to prevent THCA from converting into THC. Common THCA vehicles include topicals, juices, and tinctures. Patients can apply THCA topicals in the form of lotions, oils, and salves, directly to a targeted area so that it can provide localized pain and inflammation relief. THCA can be used in a pure crystalline form, which can be measured out into capsules for easy dosing. Patients may choose to juice cannabis or use tinctures under the tongue to consume THCA as well. Because THCA does not bind with cannabinoid receptors, it is slightly unclear how it is able to provide relief. Still, the cannabinoid is known to provide relief for a variety of symptoms.

THCA regulates immune cell function to reduce inflammation by lowering the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Because TNFα plays a role in inflammation and fever, lowering its production could reduce these symptoms, while also reducing pain, muscle spasms, menstrual cramping, and treating immune system disorders. THCA also produces anti-emetic effects, and researchers have found it reduces nausea and vomiting in animal models. THCA may also have the potential to slow tumor growth in different tumor cell types, but these anti-cancer effects are not as significant as the ones provided by other cannabinoids like CBD. Lastly, THCA acts as a neuroprotective agent. One study on brain cell cultures that had been exposed to the toxic chemical MPP found THCA protected the brain cells from toxicity. THCA increased the number of living cells after their exposure to MPP by 123%, compared to CBD which also showed protection at around 117%. This may have implications for neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Can Cannabis Relieve PMS Symptoms?

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a condition that can produce cramping, irritation, nausea, pain, mood swings, depression and anxiety in women each month around their menstruation cycle. It is now suggested cannabis may offer a valuable treatment option for symptoms of PMS. The THC and CBD found in cannabis can relieve the pain and inflammation, which can produce cramping, bloating, and other painful symptoms. Cannabis is also thought to stabilize mood which can help reduce anxiety and depression. Cannabis also provides nausea relief, something that can also have beneficial effects on mood. 

This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabinoid Receptor-1

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

Photo Credit: High Times Magazine

Scientists recently identified the structure of the cannabinoid-1 receptor, which is the receptor of the endocannabinoid system responsible for binding with THC. The CB1 receptor is classified as a GPCR protein, which is the most common class of receptor proteins in our body and of which 40% of drugs are developed to target. Technological advancements in X-Ray crystallography have allowed scientists to develop CB1 crystals. With this new information, scientists will be able to understand how THC binding affects the protein differently from other binding partners, and how the receptor functions at an atomic scale so that they can better understand its role in the treatment of diseases like epilepsy and obesity.

This information has been provided by High Times Magazine and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

How Cannabinoids Translate Into Effects

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

The relief cannabis provides to patients is largely dependent on the cannabinoid and terpenoid composition of the cannabis strain involved. There are many different cannabinoids present in cannabis, of which the most common are THC and CBD. THC is a psychoactive cannabinoid that increases appetite, reduces pain, and promotes rest. CBD is a non-psychoactive compound that relieves anxiety and muscle spasticity, improves moods, and reduces inflammation. CBD also has the ability to buffer the psychoactive effects of THC, so that patients can reap the benefits of both cannabinoids without experiencing as much of a high feeling.

Other lesser known cannabinoids include CBN, which has sedative and anti-asthmatic effects and is beneficial for glaucoma, CBC which stimulates brain growth and acts as an anti-depressant, CBG which is a non-psychoactive antibiotic, THCv which promotes weight loss and provides anti-seizure benefits, and lastly Delta(8)THC, which is less psychoactive than the well-known Delta(9)THC and contains calming properties. Cannabinoids can work together in what is known as the entourage effect in order to provide relief for a myriad of symptoms. 

This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis Shows Promising Results for Headache Disorders, Review Finds

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A research review headed by Dr. Igor Grant of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California, San Diego, and published in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research suggests cannabis may be able to treat headaches. The review looked at clinical and preclinical findings on cannabis for headaches. Grant writes, “Early reports of cannabis for the treatment of headache appear to be largely positive, with many patients experiencing a decrease in the frequency and intensity of their headache episodes... In some cases, headache was cured entirely even after cannabis discontinuation. Furthermore, these early clinical reports praise the apparent safety of long-term cannabis use, as well as its added benefits of mollifying the nausea and anxiety that often accompany headaches.”

Findings suggest a deficiency in endocannabinoids or an endocannabinoid dysfunction may result in the development of headaches or migraines, so the interaction of the cannabinoids from cannabis and this system's receptors, specifically CB1 receptors, may be able to inhibit the inflammation that causes migraine pain. Researchers hope for future clinical studies to aid in the development of dosing and treatment guidelines for cannabis and headaches, find variables that could predict headache treatment receptivity, examin long-term risks of cannabis treatments for headaches, and look at cannabis as a supplementary treatment option to other traditional headache treatments. 

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. Full text of the review can be found here

Cannabis Cuts Seizure Frequency In 86% Of Patients With Refractory Epilepsy

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Scientists examining the effects of medical marijuana for the treatment of refractory epilepsy in two legalized states found the medication reduced seizure frequency in 86% of the 272 patients involved. The study, which was led by Dustin Sulak, Russell Saneto, and Bonnie Goldstein was published in Epilepsy & Behavior. Of the participants, 10% experienced complete seizure freedom, 28% experienced a 76-99% reduction in seizures, 17% experienced a 51-75% reduction, 18% experienced a 26-50% reduction, and 15% experienced between 1-25% seizure reduction. Only minor adverse side effects were reported, and patients also reported an increased alertness as a benefit. Only 14% found cannabis was ineffective for seizure treatment. Researchers hope for more research involving cannabis and epilepsy so that they can better understand the dose-response relationship with cannabinoids and seizures. This study found a non-linear dose-response relationship, meaning a higher dose is not always more effective.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc, and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also read the text of the study here

Dr. Carlos Aguirre Publishes Results ON Effects of CBD on Childhood Epilepsy

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study, performed by Dr. Carlos Aguirre-Velazquez and published in Neurology Research International, suggests CBD may successfully treat refractory epilepsy in children. In the study, Dr. Aguirre-Velazquez provided structured online surveys to parents in Mexico and other areas of Latin America who were using CBD to treat their children's epilepsy. The study involved 53 epilepsy cases in children between the ages of 9 months and 18 years old, and several different forms of childhood epilepsy, including Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, unspecified refractory epilepsy, West syndrome, Doose syndrome, and Ohtahara syndrome.

Of the 43 cases in Mexico, 51% of patients experienced a decrease in convulsions by more than 75%, while 16% of patients became seizure free. 47% of all of the cases in the study had reported previously using 9 or more anticonvulsant therapies, and when CBD was used, parents reported a decrease in convulsions in over 81% of cases. In 9 of 43 cases, the use of CBD allowed patients to reduce the number of anti-epileptic drugs involved in their therapies. No adverse side effects were reported throughout the study, with only minor side effects like increased appetite or changes in sleep pattern reported. Overall quality of life was reported, with 88% showing improved cognition, 86% showing improved emotions or moods, 77% showing improved sleep, and 67% showing improved appetite.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis Topicals: A Beginner’s Guide

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Photo Credit: Leaf Science

Many medical marijuana patients look to cannabis topicals like ointments, creams, and lotions, for symptom relief without any psychoactive side effects. When applied to affected areas of the body, topicals can provide localized pain relief from sore muscles, itchiness from skin conditions like eczema, or joint pain from arthritis. Unlike other methods of ingestion, topicals can target specific areas of the body without affecting others. With topicals, cannabinoids are absorbed through the skin before interacting with the endocannabinoid system. According to Dr. Ethan Russo, MD., both CB1 and CB2 receptors are present in the skin and involved with regulating pain, itching, and inflammation caused by many dermatological conditions. The skin acts as a difficult barrier, so THC is prevented from entering the bloodstream and therefore does not produce the psychoactive effect so commonly associated with marijuana. In fact, one study published in the journal Forensic Science International found THC is not evident in blood or urine tests after consistent use of THC-based topicals.

One study from the University of Bonn's Department of Dermatology and Allergy looked at the uses of topical THC for allergic inflammation, and found cannabinoids should indeed be utilized for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. Another study from 2009 and published in the journal Experimental Dermatology suggested cannabinoids had "immunosuppressive properties and could be considered as potential anti-inflammatory drugs," and that topically administrated cannabis has antiprurity (anti-itching) properties for pain relief. Authors concluded, "On the basis of the current knowledge, therapeutic possibilities of cannabinoid usage in skin diseases seem to be unquestionable... Possibly, in the future, cannabinoids will be widely applied to treat pruritus, inflammatory skin diseases and even skin cancers.”

This information has been provided by Leaf Science and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

How Cannabis Eases Suffering for HIV/AIDS Patients

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

While HIV/AIDS treatments have proven effective for treating the virus itself and have significantly extended the lifespan of patients, they produce a wide range of negative side effects. Studies have shown cannabis may able to reduce these side effects associated with the medications, so that patients can continue to undergo treatment without discomfort. A study from 2014 in Canada found 38.5% of its study participants used cannabis while undergoing treatment for HIV/AIDS. Of those users, 80% reported cannabis relieved HIV-related stress and pain.

HIV/AIDS patients often lose their appetites, which results in rapid weight loss. The loss of nutrients exacerbates other symptoms and puts patients in danger of risking infections. In 2007, a study found cannabis increased caloric intake and body weight in spite of the negative side effects of HIV medications like nausea and vomiting. HIV/AIDS patients also experience pain, specifically peripheral neuropathy. In one study that looked at cannabis in relation to HIV-induced nerve pain found, 50% of patients smoked cannabis three times a daily for five days. These patients reported a 34% reduction in pain, results that are similar to the pain relief provided by traditional oral drugs. Lastly, there is evidence to suggest cannabis may act as an immune modulator and anti-viral agent, however this information has not been concluded in human trials. Another longitudinal study over the course of a decade found cannabis use was associated with lower viral loads.

This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

3 Benefits of THC

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

While THC is known for producing a psychoactive "high" for recreational users, medical marijuana patients and researchers recognize THC also has medicinal properties to it. THC is a cannabinoid that occurs naturally in the cannabis plant, and that is able to connect to receptors throughout the endocannabinoid system and in the brain and immune system. THC is already known for its ability to increase appetite, but this can be especially effective for treating nausea and vomiting and stimulating appetite in patients suffering from HIV or cancer. It has also effectively increased appetite in patient suffering from illnesses like anorexia or Alzheimer's. This helps users maintain a stable body mass.

Recently, CBD has been gaining a lot of attention for its efficacy in pain management, which could have a beneficial impact on the opioid epidemic. What isn't as well known, however, is that THC also has analgesic properties. Studies have found THC effectively treats pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, headaches, menstrual pain, chronic bowel inflammation, and nerve damage. A study from the University of Michigan involving 185 patients found medical cannabis users experienced a 45% increase in their quality of life. Lastly, it is thought THC may help those who suffer from anxiety or depression. THC has fewer side effects than the commonly prescribed anti-depressant medications, and it can increase serotonin levels which helps relieve depression. 

This information has been brought to you by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

 

Studies Suggest Cannabis May Treat Herpes

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Once infected with the herpes simplex virus (HSV), the virus lasts for life. Herpes is a prevalent virus, and according to the CDC, one in six Americans between 14 and 49 are infected with the virus. While outbreaks may be rare or infrequent, they consist of painful blisters and sores on the mouth and lips (HSV 1) or in the genital area (HSV 2) that can only be treated with ointments and creams when outbreaks occur.

Now, studies are showing topicals including cannabinoids might be the a valuable treatment option for patients with herpes. In 1980, a study published in the Journal of General Virology found THC stopped both herpes viruses from replicating and spreading. Later, in 1991, a study found THC suppressed viability of herpes by 80%, making it less infective and slowing its replication. Lastly, in 2004, in attempting to better understand how cannabis fights herpes, scientists found THC targets viral/cellular mechanisms, so that it works at the cellular level to combat herpes. Various cannabis oils and infused topicals can be applied to the skin to act transdermally and act at the cellular level. While THC specifically helps prevent the spread of herpes, topicals that also contain CBD can help reduce pain and inflammation.

This information has been brought to you by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

New Study Finds Regular Cannabis Use Associated with Lower Body Fat, No Loss in Bone Density

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study from Oregon's Health and Science University have determined regular cannabis use results in lower body fat percentage. The study, which was published in Archives of Osteoporosis, determined of the 4,743 participants between ages 20-59 in the survey, those who used cannabis more than five times a month had a lower body mass index when compared to non-users. Carrie M. Nielson, who led the researchers, wrote, "Heavy users of cannabis had a lower mean BMI compared to that of never users, with a mean BMI being 26.7 kg/m2 in heavy users and 28.4 kg/m2 in never users." Additionally, cannabis use did not produce changes in bone mineral density of lumbar spine or proximal femur. In fact, while bone density decreases with age, cannabis has been found to interact with CB2 receptors to actually boost bone density. Heavy users of cannabis were also more likely to be physically active and for longer periods of time.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.