Is Cannabis Beneficial for Acne?

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Research has found cannabinoids can be beneficial in the treatment of a wide variety of skin conditions, including psoriasis, eczema, and dermatitis. While there is little information surrounding the use of cannabis for targeting acne, what data we have suggests it may indeed offer an effective alternative treatment option. Sebaceous glands contain cannabinoid receptors, suggesting they may be modulated through the use of cannabinoids and their interactions with the endocannabinoid system. CBD inhibits lipid production throughout skin cells, which allows it to regulate the secretions of oils in the skin. One clinical trial investigating CBD facial serum found 100% of participants reported an improvement in skin appearance over the course of two weeks. Similarly, hemp oil significantly reduced sebum secretion and was well tolerated by participants who used it over the course of 12 weeks. CBD's anti-inflammatory properties could allow it to reduce the swelling and redness caused by acne. Lastly, the antibacterial properties of various cannabinoids could in turn prevent acne. 

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis Not Harmful to Immune Systems of HIV Patients, Study Finds

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

According to research published in Drug and Alcohol Review, patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C Virus (HCV) who use medical cannabis to manage their symptoms will not further damage their immune systems. A team of researchers from the French Institute of Health and Medical Research led by Fabienne Marcellin gathered information from 955 HIV and HCV patients to examine if cannabis use affected their circulating CD4 T-cell count. Using self-administered questionnaires, the team determined cannabis use was not associated with significant changes in CD4 T-cell count. Marijuana could be a particularly beneficial method for symptom management due to its ability to improve appetite, and reduce muscle pain, nausea, anxiety, and depression. 

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can access the study here

Scientists Zero In On Marijuana Receptor To Figure Out How it Functions

 Photo Credit: High Times

Photo Credit: High Times

Scientists have long known about the CB1 receptor, the endocannabinoid system, and that THC and other phytocannabinoids have the ability to bind with these receptors. While previously researchers thought CB1 receptors would bind with THC in a "lock and key" sort of scenario, they are now understanding that CB1 receptors are mobile and malleable, giving them the ability to conform to a wide range of molecules. CB1 receptors are flexible spirals composed of amino acids that eave through a cell's membrane. These spirals coalesce around the receptor's binding site upon entry of a cannabinoid. This new research was further substantiated when researchers led by Alexandros Makriyannis, director of Northeastern University's Center for Drug Discovery, were able to crystallize a CB1 receptor as it was in the process of binding with a THC-like molecule, a breakthrough that will help researchers to better understand the binding process so that they can develop synthetic chemicals that reproduce the desirable medicinal effects found in cannabis. 

This information has been provided by High Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

 

Study Shows Majority of Chronic Pain & Mental Health Patients Prefer Cannabis to Opioids

 Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

A new study published in the International Journal of Drug Policy suggests chronic pain and mental health patients prefer cannabis to opioids. In the study, researchers surveyed 250 patients, of which 63% used cannabis in place of opioids, sedatives, and antidepressants. Patients who substituted cannabis for opioids and benzodiazepines, which were the two primary classes of drugs that were substituted, cited fewer side-effects, better symptom management, and a better safety profile as their top reasons for making the swap. This study has huge implications when it comes to battling the opioid epidemic that is sweeping the nation today. With fewer side effects and a higher safety profile, patients can feel more in control of effectively managing their symptoms without risking adverse side effects or overdose.

This information has been provided by the Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis Could Treat Tourette Syndrome: Study

 Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

A new study coming out of the University of Toronto suggests that cannabis may be an effective alternative treatment option for Tourette's symptoms. In the study, which was led by Elia Abi-Jaoude and published in the Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, researchers found 18 of 19 participants who used cannabis routinely for over two years saw significant improvements in symptoms. While the study is hopeful, it could have benefited from a larger sample size, more consistency in cannabis strains, and placebo control. Abi-Jaoude hopes to take this study further, using controlled and double-blind methods along with various cannabis strains. Still, Abi-Jaoude believes cannabis shows promise as a treatment for tics and other Tourette's-related symptoms.

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

New Research Review Confirms Favorable Safety Profile of CBD

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new research review published in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research support the notion that cannabidiol (CBD) is safe for human consumption. Investigators Iffland Kerstin and Grotenhermen Franjo from German research center nova-insisut built upon Mateus Machado Bergamaschi's comprehensive survey that analyzed various studies involving controlled CBD for humans and animals. This new review updated the existing information with new findings from both preclinical and clinical trials. Researchers concluded that the studies indicated CBD had no adverse psychological effect on blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, glucose levels, pH, pressure exerted by carbon dioxide or oxygen, hematocrit, gastrointestinal transit, emesis, rectal pressure, or potassium and sodium levels. One study found 60 mg/kg of CBD given to mice three days weekly for twelve weeks had no adverse effects on any of their bodily movements. Chronic use of CBD in humans has proven to have no neurological, psychiatric, or clinical adverse effects, nor any respiratory depression or cardiovascular complications. 

The new review also indicates CBD may possess immunomodulatory and neuroprotective properties, and may have the ability to support the treatment of heroin addiction, reduce seizures, manage psychosis, inhibit cancer, and reduce anxiety. There may be some drug interaction between CBD and pharmaceutical medications, including any medications metabolized by enzymes from the cytochrome P450 family, which include: Lipitor (atorvastatin), Xanax (alprazolam), caffeine, naproxen, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, and codeine. CBD may also inhibit the enzymes CYP2D6 and CYP2C9, which could reduce how medications like omeprazole, risperidone, warfarin, and diclofenac are metabolized. Additionally, in vitro studies have noted CBD inhibits the ABC transporters P glycoprotein and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein, which could interfere with some anticancer drugs binding to transporters. On the other hand, certain drug interactions have been beneficial, and one 8-week-long clinical study on children with epilepsy found CBD increased the bioavailability of the anti-epileptic medication clobazam, so patients could more effectively manage their seizures while reducing their dose of the anti-epileptic medication.

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study Finds Cannabis is Effective for Treating Tourette’s Patients

 Photo Credit: Marijuana Times

Photo Credit: Marijuana Times

A new study published in the Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences has found cannabis effectives reduces symptoms in those suffering from Tourette's syndrome. Researcher Elia Abi-Jaoude, with the help of the University of Toronto, conducted a retroactive study on 19 patients, and found cannabis not only allowed 18 of them to experience a 60% reduction in tics but that the medication was also well tolerated among participants. Abi-Jaoude explains, “Several of my patients with Tourette syndrome had noticed that if they used some marijuana, their tics decreased significantly... We began prescribing medical cannabis at our clinic and were struck by the improvements we saw in tics and related symptoms. We eventually decided that we should investigate this topic further.”

While this observational study is hopeful, there is still much to be discovered through more investigative clinical research that is controlled and involves placebo. Abi-Jaoude explains, “We hope that with further research we can get a clearer picture of the potential benefits and risks with using cannabis for tics and related symptoms.” 

This information has been provided by Marijuana Times and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis is More Effective at Treating Migraine Pain than Prescription Drugs

 Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

A new study presented at the 3rd Congress of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) and conducted by Dr. Maria Nicolodi from the Interuniversity Center in Florence has determined cannabis is more effective than traditional medications when it comes to treating the pain associated with migraines and cluster headaches. Researchers determined participants needed at least 100mg of a combination of THC and CBD before patients would experience any relief. For significant relief, patients received a dose of 200 mg. The amounts of THC and CBD varied. After determining the appropriate dose, researchers administered cannabis to one group, while the other group received antidepressants or blood pressure medications that are common for migraine and cluster headache therapies. Headache patients did not experience significant relief. Migraine sufferers, on the other hand, experienced a 43.5% reduction in pain. Side effects were considered minor and less severe than those experienced from prescription medications. 

Dr. Nicolodi says of the study, “We were able to demonstrate that cannabinoids are an alternative to established treatments in migraine prevention. That said, they are only suited for use in the acute treatment of cluster headaches in patients with a history of migraine from childhood on.”

This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Majority of Pain Sufferers Prefer Cannabis to Opioids, Finds New Study

 Photo Credit: K-State Research and Extension / FLICKR (https://bit.ly/2wmSvJC)

Photo Credit: K-State Research and Extension / FLICKR (https://bit.ly/2wmSvJC)

In a survey conducted by HelloMD in cooperation with the University of California Berkeley and involving 3,000 medical marijuana users, researchers found 97% of respondents either agreed or agreed strongly that medical cannabis allowed them to decrease their use of opioid painkillers. In addition, 92% of respondents agreed or agreed strongly that they preferred medical cannabis as a treatment option to their traditional medications. For 81% of respondents, cannabis alone was considered more effective than combining cannabis and opioids. Chief Medical Officer of HelloMD, Dr. Perry Solomon, hopes this study will "awaken the public, medical professionals and legislatures to the fact that cannabis is a safe, non-addictive product, available to help fight the opioid epidemic.”

This information has been provided by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis for Cancer: Medicating Without the High

 Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

Thanks to the various cannabinoids and terpenes found in cannabis, cancer patients may find an alternative treatment option for their conditions without experiencing any psychoactive high. Different combinations of cannabinoids and terpenes could have positive implications for cancer treatment. Although THC produces the high that most consumers associate with marijuana, the properties of CBD and the cannabinoid CBG may be able to buffer against these effects. CBG, like CBD, also offers anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects. Researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have partnered with CURE Pharmaceutical to better understand the best cannabinoids for cancer-specific treatments. The use of cannabinoids as a supplementary treatment option for those undergoing chemotherapy or radiation could have huge benefits in not only reinforcing the cancer fighting capabilities of these treatments, but also in combatting the horrible side effects that accompany them. 

This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study Finds Cannabis Has Anti-Tumor Effects

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

A newly published review led by Gianna Wilkie and a team of researchers from the Brown University Alpert Medical School has determined cannabis inhibits tumor and reduces the severity of symptoms associated with chemotherapy treatments. The review, which can be found in JAMA Oncology, examined existing studies surrounding cannabis and its cancer-related value. The review analyzed in vivo and in vitro studies that demonstrated cannabis' ability to inhibit tumor growth through by increasing cancer cell death and suppressing cell proliferation. Both THC and CBD displayed potential antineoplastic properties. Wilkie concluded, “Cannabis in oncology may have potential in its use for anticipatory and refractory [cannabis-induced nausea and vomiting], refractory cancer pain, and as an antitumor agent.”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study Finds CBD Reduces Blood Pressure

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

A new study published in JCI Insight suggests CBD reduces systolic blood pressure, which could have beneficial implications for cardiovascular disorders. Researchers from the University of Nottingham looked at the cardiovascular effects of a single oral dose of 600mg CBD when compared to placebo in nine healthy male adults averaging around 24 years old. The investigators monitored cardiovascular parameters like blood pressure, heart rate, stroke volume, and skin blood blow, while subjects were at rest and when subjects under went stress tests for two hours.

Researchers concluded CBD reduced systolic blood pressure by an average of 6 mmHg at rest, 5 mmHg before and after stress, and 6 mmHg in response to cold stress. CBD also reduced stroke volume and increased heart rate by about 7 beats per minute, but there was no observed decline in cardiac output. The study determined, “Our data show that a single dose of CBD reduces resting blood pressure and the blood pressure response to stress, particularly cold stress, and especially in the post-test periods. This may reflect the anxiolytic and analgesic effects of CBD, as well as any potential direct cardiovascular effects."

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by out Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis Could Be Better For Migraines Than Pharmaceuticals: Study

 Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

A new study conducted by researchers at the Interuniversity Center in Florence, Italy, suggests pills containing THC and CBD can reduce migraine pain by 43.5%. Additionally, the medication can help curb stomach-aches and muscle pain. The study involved 79 migraine and cluster headache sufferers who were given an oral dose of medication containing both THC and CBD over the course of three months. Those who suffered from cluster headaches received either  200mg THC-CBD or 25 mg amitriptyline, while migraine sufferers received 200 mg THC-CBD after the onset of acute pain.

Researchers determined the cannabinoid medication was slightly more effective at curbing the frequency and severity of cluster headaches by cutting incidents by 40.4%. In comparison, amitriptyline cut headaches by 40.1%. Cannabis also cut the severity of migraine pain by 43.5%. Lead researcher Dr. Maria Nicolodi explains, “We were able to demonstrate that cannabinoids are an alternative to established treatments in migraine prevention... That said, they are only suited for use in the acute treatment of cluster headaches in patients with a history of migraine from childhood on.”

This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study: Patients Report Substituting Cannabis For Opioids, Other Pain Medications

 Photo Credit: NORML

Photo Credit: NORML

According to data published in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, patients are successfully substituting cannabis for opioids and other analgesics for the treatment of pain. Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, and Kent State University looked at data from 2,897 self-identified medical cannabis patients, of which 97% of those who acknowledged using opioid medications within the past 6 months were able to decrease their intake with thanks to the use of cannabis. Ninety-two percent of respondents also claimed cannabis had fewer side effects than opioids, and eighty-two percent said medical cannabis provided better relief and symptom management. Of the participants who had taken nonopioid-based pain medications, 96% were able to reduce their usage after beginning cannabis use, and 92% claimed medical cannabis was the more effective option. Authors explained, “[M]ore people are looking at cannabis as a viable treatment for everyday ailments such as muscle soreness and inflammation. … [T]his study can conclude that medical cannabis patients report successfully using cannabis along with or as a substitute for opioid-based pain medication.”

This information has been provided by NORML and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabis Beneficial for Dementia Symptoms, Pilot Study Finds

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A recent open-label trial published in The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and conducted by a team of Israeli researchers from the Israel and Sackler Faculty of Medicine at Tel-Aviv University has determined cannabis extracts containing THC help treat the symptoms associated with dementia and Alzheimer's disease. The team examined the use of THC treatments on 11 patients with Alzheimer's disease over the course of four weeks. After the treatments, the team recorded a significant reduction in the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale and in behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia like agitation, aggression, irritability, apathy, delusions, and sleep. Because the trial was open-label, both researchers and patients were aware of their medical cannabis with THC without the possibility of receiving a placebo. The researchers stated, “Adding [medical cannabis oil] to [Alzheimer’s disease] patients’ pharmacotherapy is safe and a promising treatment option.”

This information adds to a growing list of clinical trials suggesting that cannabis could have beneficial implications for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also access the study here

Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA): The Raw Cannabinoid For Pain - Part 2

 Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

In our previous post, we briefly introduced the raw and acidic form of THC, known as tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA). In this post, we will continue our discussion by taking a closer look at all the cannabinoid has to offer. 

THCA may be able to reduce nausea and vomiting, and in a study published in the British Journal of Pharmacology, THCA reduced nausea and vomiting without intoxicating rodents and shrews who showed nausea behaviors and who received a substance that induced vomiting. Another study found THCA blocks the same enzymes that NSAIDS target from manufacturing pro-inflammatory compounds, suggesting the compound contains anti-inflammatory properties. Another study from 2012 found THCA reduced the progression of Parkinson's Disease in experimental models. In the experiment, THCA reduced damage to neurons from positively charged neurotoxins. 

A study from 2008 suggests THC and THCA both engaged the cell receptor TRPA1, a receptor that is currently under the gaze of many pain researchers for its role in inflammatory, neuropathic, and migraine pain. Lastly, according to research published in 2013, THCA may contain anti-cancer and anti-proliferative effects. The study involved laboratory models of prostate cancer, and although its effects were not as significant as the effects of CBD, there is still reason to investigate THCA further. 

This concludes our discussion of THCA. This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.  

 

Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA): The Raw Cannabinoid For Pain - Part 1

 Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

A majority of cannabis users and medical marijuana patients will heat their marijuana to activate its cannabinoids in a process called decarboxylation. What many don't know, however, is that some of marijuana's raw and unheated compounds can also produce therapeutic effects. One such compound is the acidic form and antecedent of THC, known as tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA). Unlike THC, it's raw and acidic form does not produce any psychoactive effects. It is safe and known for its ability to ease pain and sooth an upset stomach. While many pass by THCA, the compound has its own valuable therapeutic and nutritional attributes that should not be overlooked. 

So how can you get a good dose of THCA if you're not applying heat to cannabis for consumption? One method patients can take advantage of is cannabis juicing. Another is through the creation of raw cannabis oil, which are usually sold in an oral syringe or capsules and can be consumed like any dietary supplement. Patients can also create uncooked edibles, like salads or salad dressings. 

In our next post, we will take a deeper look at just what these valuable attributes are. This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.  

More Evidence Indicates CBD is Beneficial for Alzheimer's Disease

 Photo Credit: Nick Youngson / Alpha Stock Images  Nick Youngson  /  Alpha Stock Images

Photo Credit: Nick Youngson / Alpha Stock Images Nick Youngson / Alpha Stock Images

According to a new research review published in Frontiers in Pharmacology, CBD produces various therapeutic benefits against Alzheimer's disease. Australian researchers were prompted to review articles that had previously investigated CBD's effects on the disease because they were intrigued by the compound's neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties, all of which could reduce or inhibit the cognitive and functional impairment resulting from Alzheimer's. Some of the in vivo studies reviewed suggested CBD reduced reactive gliosis and the neuroinflammatory response, something that has been linked to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's. CBD may also promote neurogenesis to reduce deterioration of cognitive functions. Preclinical animal studies suggested CBD reverses and prevents cognitive deficits from developing. Other studies found CBD's effects are further enhanced by THC, and that a combination offers greater anti-dementia effects without producing the psychoactive effects that THC alone would produce.

The review concludes, “The studies reviewed in this mini review provide “proof of principle” for the therapeutic benefits CBD and possibly CBD-THC combinations pose for AD therapy... The studies discussed here provide promising preliminary data and the translation of this preclinical work into the clinical setting could be realized relatively quickly: CBD is readily available, appears to only have limited side effects and is safe for human use.”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also read the full text of the study here.

CBD Inhibits Plaque-Forming Alzheimer's Proteins, Study Finds

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

A new study published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences indicated pretreating cells with CBD inhibited the expression of amyloid-beta proteins, thereby preventing the development of Alzheimer's disease. In the study, a team of Italian researchers led by Rosaliana Libro administered CBD to mesenchymal stem cells derived from gingiva (GMSCs) and found pretreating with CBD caused a downregulation in the genes linked to Alzheimer's. CBD also modified the genes involved in the production of beta-amyloid proteins. Libro explains, “In conclusion, this preliminary in vitro study has demonstrated that GMSCs preconditioned with CBD have better therapeutic potential compared to [control] GMSCs cells, and we believe that their transplantation in the early stage of [Alzheimer’s disease] may play a role in preventing or attenuating the disease onset."

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study: CBD Administration Reduces Blood Pressure

 Photo Credit: NORML

Photo Credit: NORML

According to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, oral CBD may be able to reduce blood pressure. The study, led by investigators from the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom, assessed the use of a single oral dose of 600 mg of CBD extract versus placebo in 9 healthy male volunteer subjects. CBD administration resulted in reduced resting systolic blood pressure and stroke volume compared to placebo, and its intake reduced blood pressure levels after exercise or in response to stress. While increased heart rate was observed after administration, but no adverse events were reported. Study authors concluded, “Our data show that a single dose of CBD reduces resting blood pressure and the blood pressure response to stress, particularly cold stress, and especially in the post-test periods. This may reflect the anxiolytic and analgesic effects of CBD, as well as any potential direct cardiovascular effects. … Further research is also required to establish whether CBD has any role in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders such as a hypertension.”

This information has been provided by NORML and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.