Researchers Identify the Perfect Dose of THC to Help You Relax

 Photo Credit: Pixabay

Photo Credit: Pixabay

Research has shown that cannabis may have the ability to help you relax, however taking too much of a dose containing THC can actually have the opposite effect and exacerbate paranoia, anxiety, and stress. Now, a team of researchers from the University of Chicago have found the optimal amount of THC to help stimulate relaxation. The team experimented with varying doses of THC and monitored how subjects responded to stressful situations. The 42 participants were first divided into three subgroups, of which one received an oral dose of 12.5mg THC, another received 7.5mg THC, and the last received placebo. It is important to note that even this higher dose of THC is less than what one might receive from a dispensary, with half a joint often containing between 33 - 39mg THC. 

After receiving their dose, participants were placed in stressful situations, like giving speeches or taking oral math tests in front of interviewers while being recorded on camera and simultaneously watching this recording live. The subjects' performances were rated, and they were also asked to rate their levels of stress. Researchers determined that, in comparison to placebo, the lower dose of THC “reduced the duration of negative emotional responses to acute psychosocial stress, and participants’ post-task appraisals of how threatening and challenging they found the stressor.” The higher dose, on the other hand, “produced small but significant increases in anxiety, negative mood and subjective distress at baseline before the tasks began.” The anxiety and negative thoughts continued throughout the test. Researchers concluded low doses of THC are ideal for relaxation, which could have beneficial implications for those who suffer from various anxiety disorders. 

Further research that isn't limited to oral THC and that includes a variety of cannabinoids combinations is desired for more accurate data that is applicable to what a patient would encounter in everyday life. This information has been provided by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

How Medicinal Marijuana Can Treat Migraines

 Photo Credit: The Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: The Medicinal Marijuana Association

In a study published by in Pharmacotherapy, researchers determined medicinal marijuana effectively reduced the frequency of migraine headaches in 103 of its 121 participants. The ability for cannabinoids to interact with and bind to pain receptors in the brain allow it to mitigate pain perception.  Participants reported inhalation as their preferred vehicle of administration due to the fast onset of its therapeutic effects. They also opted for marijuana with higher concentrations of CBD in order to avoid the plant's psychoactive effects and continue with their daily routines. 

This information has been provided by the Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Small Doses of Cannabis Slow the Progression of Alzheimer's Disease, Study Finds

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

According to a study conducted by neuroscientists from the University of South Florida and published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, extremely small amounts of THC inhibited the production of amyloid-beta proteins on a cellular model of Alzheimer's disease, suggesting the cannabinoids could benefit those who suffer from Alzheimer's disease. Additionally, THC enhanced mitochondrial function, which helped cells in supplying energy and transmitting signals, and helped in maintaining their health.

Lead author of the study, Chuanhai Cao, PhD, explains, "THC is known to be a potent antioxidant with neuroprotective properties, but this is the first report that the compound directly affects Alzheimer’s pathology by decreasing amyloid beta levels, inhibiting its aggregation, and enhancing mitochondrial function... Decreased levels of amyloid beta means less aggregation, which may protect against the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Since THC is a natural and relatively safe amyloid inhibitor, THC or its analogs may help us develop an effective treatment in the future.”

This is not the first study suggesting cannabis can help in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, with earlier studies finding THC breaks down the buildup of beta-amyloid protein plaques and reduces cell inflammation, or that THC restores memory and cognitive abilities. This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

How Effective is Medical Marijuana for Chronic Pain Relief?

 Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

Photo Credit: Medicinal Marijuana Association

According to a study conducted by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), there is conclusive or substantial evidence that cannabis and cannabinoids effectively treat chronic pain. Cannabis was proven most effective for treating chronic pain associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) or chemotherapy. Additionally, cannabis and its cannabinoids helped to manage the muscle spasms associated with MS and the nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy treatments. Researchers have determined THC and CBD are the most favorable cannabis compounds for pain relief, and our bodies naturally receive and interact with cannabinoids using receptors within the endocannabinoid system in order to produce optimal pain relief.  

This information has been provided by the Medicinal Marijuana Association and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study: No Increase In Problematic Cannabis Use Following Passage Of Medical Marijuana Laws

 Photo Credit: NORML

Photo Credit: NORML

 

Those who oppose medical marijuana legalization often cite a fear that it will increase the problematic use of marijuana among those who do not need the medicine, but data published in the journal Addiction suggests this is not the case. Investigators from Columbia University assessed the cannabis use trends following the legalization of medical marijuana in different states and found “no significant change in the prevalence of past-month marijuana use among adolescents or young adults (those ages 18 to 25).” Additionally, there was no evidence to support the notion that legalization resulted in increased cannabis abuse or dependence in young people and adults. Less regulated medical marijuana programs were associated with more self-reported use by adults age 26 and older than in states with more regulations.

This information supports the findings of various studies conducted previously, and contradicts the speculation that medical marijuana laws increase the prevalence of cannabis use disorder among adults. This information has been provided by NORML and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

 

Cannabinoids May Be Effective for Treating Alzheimer's Disease, Finds New Study

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc. 

Researchers from the Anesthesiology Institute at Cleveland Clinic have determined agonists of the CB2 receptor provide neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects that reduce brain cell damage, which could have beneficial implications for those who suffer from Alzheimer's disease. In the animal study, which was published in the European Journal of Pharmacology, researchers administered CB2 agonists which resulted helped to suppress neuroinflammation and enhance the removal of amyloid-beta plaques, which led to an increase in brain cell recovery and an improvement in cognitive performance. Researchers used the CB2 agonist MDA7 to mimic the effects of cannabinoids. 

The researchers right, "CB2 receptors act as a negative feedback regular; when activated by a CB2 agonist, they can help limit the extent of the neuroinflammatory response and the subsequent development of neuronal damage in the central nervous system... Collectively, these findings suggest that [a CB2 agonist] has a potential therapeutic effect in the setting of AD.” This study supports the findings of previous studies involving cannabinoids and Alzheimer's disease, and suggests cannabinoids could also be beneficial for other degenerative neuroinflammatory diseases.  

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc, and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can find the text of the study here

Study Examines How Cannabinoids Elicit Anti-Cancer Effects

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A recent research review led by Dr. Guillermo Velasco of Complutense University of Madrid and published in Current Oncology looked into previous studies that examined the molecular mechanisms of the actions cannabinoids use to combat cancer. In the review, the researchers discuss how THC and CBD interact with CB1 and CB2 receptors to initiate chemical reactions that suppress tumor growth. To highlight the importance of the CB1 receptor, one animal study found removing CB1 receptors accelerates tumor growth in the intestines. Another found cannabinoids that interact with CB1 receptors reduce levels of cancerous precursors. Additionally, the removal of enzymes that harm cannabinoids results in the reduction of tumor growth in mice. Through binding to CB1 and CB2 receptors, cannabinoids impair the progression of tumors and induce apoptosis which kills cancer cells and prevents them from spreading.

Other preclinical studies have found cannabinoids stimulate the production of ceramide, a compound known to induce apoptosis, and enhance the expression of p8 (NUPR 1), a stress regulated protein that stimulates autophagy mediated cancer cell death and regulates tumorigenesis and tumor progression. CBD is also able to promote apoptotic death in cancer cells independently of CB1 and CB2 receptors. Cannabinoids also work together with anticancer drugs to reduce tumor growth, and THC and CBD when combined with radiotherapy or cancer drugs enhance anti-cancer effects. Valesco Concludes, “To summarize, cannabinoids induce tumour cell death and inhibit tumour angiogenesis and invasion in animal models of cancer, and there are indications that they act similarly in patients with glioblastoma... Given that cannabinoids show an acceptable safety profile, clinical trials testing them as single drugs, or ideally, in combination therapies in glioblastoma and other types of cancer are both warranted and urgently needed.”

 

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc, and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can find the full text of the study here.

How Cannabis Fits Into Cancer Care

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new research review conducted by cancer and integrative medicine specialist Dr. Donald Abrams and published in the journal Current Oncology highlights the potential for cannabis in managing cancer-related symptoms and treating cancer. Abrams explains, “Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy.”

Some studies cited reveal cannabis can reduce or prevent neuropathic pain, and Abrams himself claims to have seen patients benefit from the analgesic properties of cannabis so that it allowed them to wean down or off of opiate medications. Cannabis is also effective in reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, and some research suggests it is the only nausea-suppressing substance that can also stimulate appetite. While there is not enough evidence yet to suggest cannabis can cure cancer, cannabinoids have demonstrated anticancer effects in several preclinical trials, with some showing cannabinoids inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and others revealing cannabinoids induce apoptosis, decreased tumor cell invasiveness, and reduce the viability of cancer cells. Abrams concludes, “Preclinical data suggest that cannabinoids could have direct antitumour activity, possibly most impressive in central nervous system malignancies. Clinical data about the effects of cannabis concentrates on cancer are as yet unavailable. Oncologists could find cannabis and cannabinoids to be effective tools in their care of patients living with and beyond cancer.”

You can read more about the review on Medical Marijuana Inc, or access the study directly here. This information has been approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

CBD Could Help Treat Schizophrenia Symptoms, Study Finds

 Photo Credit: Civilized

Photo Credit: Civilized

Researchers from the Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute (IHMRI) have recently determined CBD isolate could treat the negative cognitive symptoms that coincide with schizophrenia, including social withdrawal and blunted emotional expression. The study, which was published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, involved using a rodent model of schizophrenia and comparing rats treated with CBD to those left untreated. The researchers found CBD restored cognition, working memory, and social behavior.

This information is significant considering past research has suggested cannabis actually heightened the risk of developing psychoses. University of Wollongong PhD candidate Ashleigh Osborne notes CBD may fill a void left by current antipsychotic medication treatments, explaining, "This is really important because current antipsychotic drugs don't address the cognitive deficits, which approximately 80 per cent of patients with schizophrenia experience... This is the first study to prove Cannabidiol can be used to treat symptoms of schizophrenia that aren't addressed by current medications."

Further research is desired to see if the results produced by he rodent model would translate to actual people suffering from schizophrenia. This information has been provided by Civilized and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.

Study: Low-Dose THC Can Relieve Stress, but Too Much May Do the Opposite

 Photo Credit: High Times

Photo Credit: High Times

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Chicago have determined small amounts of THC may have the ability to relieve stress, but that too much of the cannabinoid can instead exacerbate symptoms. The study involved 42 healthy volunteers between 18 and 40 years old who had previously tried marijuana. They were then divided into three groups and given capsules containing either 7.5 mg THC, 12.5 mg THC, or placebo. Neither participants nor investigators were aware of who was in which dosing group. The doses were said to produce the same effects as taking a few puffs from a joint. The study took place over the course of two four-hour sessions separated by five days, in which each participant took two capsules and then were interviewed and asked to complete a "reliably stress-inducing" math task. In the second session, the participants discussed their favorite movie or book and then played solitaire. During and after, they assessed their own stress levels and feelings while their heart rates and their blood pressure and cortisol levels were monitored and measured at intervals. 

The low dose group reported less stress after the psychosocial test than the placebo groups, and their stress levels dropped faster. The higher dosing THC group reported negative moods both before and after performing their tasks, and they were more likely to rate the psychosocial tasks as challenging or threatening. Lead researcher Emma Childs explained, “We found that THC at low doses reduced stress, while higher doses had the opposite effect, underscoring the importance of dose when it comes to THC and its effects... Studies like these… are extremely important, considering the widespread use of cannabis for both medical and non-medical purposes.” Still, Child believes there are not enough significant studies due to regulatory obstacles, and hopes to see more scientific foundation behind the medicinal claims surrounding medical marijuana. 

This information has been provided by High Times Magazine and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study: Cannabis Extracts Associated With Reduced ADHD Symptoms

 Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

According to clinical trial data published in the journal European Neuropsychopharmacology, whole-plant cannabis extracts may be able to improve cognition and behavior in those who suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). In the randomized and placebo-controlled study, British scientists evaluated the efficacy of cannabis extracts for 30 adults with ADHD, and found treatment improved hyperactivity, impulsivity, inattention, cognitive performance, activity, and emotional lability. Authors concluded, “ADHD may represent a subgroup of individuals that gain cognitive enhancement and reduction of ADHD symptoms from the use of cannabinoids. These findings provide preliminary evidence using an experimental design for the self-medication hypothesis of cannabis use in ADHD; and support the need for further research into the effects of cannabinoids on ADHD symptoms and impairments.”

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabinoids and Chemotherapy Combine for Superior Anti-Leukemia Effects, Study Finds

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Researchers from St. George's University of London have discovered cannabinoids contribute to the death of leukemia cells. The study, which was led by Dr. Wai Liu and published in the International Journal of Oncology, revealed that while the cannabinoids effectively destroyed cancerous tumors alone, they were more effective when administered along with chemotherapy. In fact, even when used with lower doses of chemotherapy, they seemed to produce the same level of effect, suggesting cannabinoids could help patients to reduce the required chemotherapy dosage, and therefore reduce the side effects that accompany it. They also determined that the sequence of administration was instrumental in whether or not the cannabinoid and chemotherapy combination was effective. Cannabinoids administered before chemotherapy reduced the death of cancer cells, while cannabinoids administered after chemotherapy increased the induction of apoptosis.

The team of researchers tested different combinations of cannabinoids on leukemia cells in a laboratory and found that both CBD and THC demonstrated anti-cancer properties. It was determined that CBD and THC worked better as a pair than they did in isolation. Although these cannabinoids were administered in extremely pure and high concentrations, which could not be extracted from the natural, smokable plant, Liu said, “cannabinoids are a very exciting prospect in oncology, and studies such as ours serve to establish the best ways that they should be used to maximize a therapeutic effect." Additionally, Liu explains the importance of his study, saying, "We have shown for the first time that the order in which cannabinoids and chemotherapy are used is crucial in determining the overall effectiveness of this treatment."

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. You can also find the full text of the study here.

Why Do People Use Cannabis? Survey Finds Relaxation, Stress and Anxiety Relief

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

There are many reasons someone may choose to incorporate cannabis into his or her daily routines, whether it be to relieve symptoms associated with specific conditions or whether it be to improve ones overall quality of life. A 2017 survey from Frontier Data and involving the majority of respondents (55%) used cannabis to relax. Another 40% used cannabis to help with stress or increase the enjoyment of social experiences. Thirty-nine percent of respondents also claimed to use cannabis to reduce anxiety. These responses are backed up by numerous studies and reports that have determined non-psychoactive cannabidiol (CBD) has anxiolytic effects. About 29% percent of respondents claimed to use cannabis as a sleep aid, while 26% used cannabis to manage pain, 16% used it to stimulate creativity, and 15% used it for a specific medical condition. 

Gender also played an interesting factor in the responses, and women were found to be more likely to use cannabis for popular medicinal benefits. Women were 16% more likely to cite using cannabis for anxiety, 10% more likely to use it for sleep, 7% more likely to use it as a stress reliever, 8% more likely to use it for pain management, and 8% more likely to use it to suppress nausea. This study was conducted in partnership with MassRoots, whose CEO Isaac Dietrich explained, “Over the past three years, we’ve built a community of over a million of the world’s most passionate cannabis consumers. In conjunction with New Frontier Data, we’re releasing the first cannabis consumer sentiment report, which will analyze the hundreds of millions of anonymized data points surrounding cannabis purchasing decisions.”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Researchers Find Evidence That Cannabinoids Help Treat Cancerous Tumors

 Photo Credit: Max Pixel (https://bit.ly/2tb5HQg).

Photo Credit: Max Pixel (https://bit.ly/2tb5HQg).

Researchers from the University of London have determined cannabinoids not only support chemotherapy treatment but also decrease the growth of new tumors. In the study, which was led by Dr. Wai Liu and published in the International Journal of Oncology, a team of researchers observed the effects of different cannabinoid combinations on leukemia cells in order to determine whether or not cannabinoids enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapy treatments and to see in which order they worked most effectively. They concluded cannabinoids had an extremely positive impact on the success of chemotherapy, especially when taken after treatments. Not only did cannabis enhance chemotherapy treatments, but it also prevented the growth of new tumor cells and tumor-feeding blood vessels. The team extended their findings through studies involving cannabis-based extracts on animals, and found cannabinoids could be equally effective for glioblastoma.

While this information is positive, patients must understand that the study involved concentrated and purified cannabis extracts, so simply smoking cannabis probably would not produce the same results. If you're using medical marijuana to treat your cancer symptoms or combat tumor growth, we want to know! Whether you're using extracts or another vehicle of cannabis consumption, the anonymous information you provide could help the medical marijuana community better understand how to use the therapy to treat cancer and alleviate its symptoms. By journaling daily, you can provide vital data to physicians, researchers, and other patients, all while keeping your personal information completely private. Additionally, you'll discover insights into your own unique dosing regimen so that you can discover the most consistent and effective method for you. 

This information has been provided in part by Merry Jane and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Study: Marijuana Does Not Lead to an Increase in Psychotic Symptoms

 Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: the Daily Chronic

Even as medical marijuana gains momentum as a safe an effective treatment option for a variety of symptoms, negative connotations concerning cannabis continue to exist. These connotations can produce negative stigmas and lead to fears about the outcomes of marijuana use. One such fear is that marijuana may contribute to an increase in psychotic symptoms and episodes, but now a study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health states there is "minimal evidence" of any association between cannabis use alone and the onset of psychotic symptoms in young people.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania Department of Psychiatry looked through a cohort of 4,171 people between the ages of 14 and 21 in order to determine if there exists a relationship between drug use and the onset of psychotic symptoms. After adjusting for potential confounders, researchers determined, "neither frequent nor early cannabis use predicted increased odds of psychosis spectrum classification... Overall, we found minimal evidence for associations between cannabis use by itself and psychosis spectrum symptoms.”

These findings are similar to those of previous studies assessing cannabis use and psychosis. This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Cannabidiol (CBD) Found to Reduce Seizure Frequency in Phase III Trial

 Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

Photo Credit: The Daily Chronic

According to a placebo-controlled and randomized trial published in The New England Journal of Medicine, orally administered CBD reduces the frequency of seizures in children with severe forms of epilepsy. A team of researchers from the United States and England looked over the effects of pharmaceutical grade standardized CBD extracts in comparison to placebo and reported, "The median frequency of convulsive seizures per month decreased from 12.4 to 5.9 with cannabidiol, as compared with a decrease from 14.9 to 14.1 with placebo." The study involved 120 children and young adults with treatment resistant Dravet syndrome, but a subsequent study involving patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome yielded similar results.

This information has been provided by the Daily Chronic and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

 

Review Identifies 140 Controlled Clinical Trials Related to Cannabis

 Photo Credit: NORML

Photo Credit: NORML

There are seemingly endless claims that marijuana has medicinal properties, but many still doubt these benefits due to the fact they believe medical marijuana lacks substantial clinical and scientific research. While it is true that marijuana's schedule I status in the United States creates difficult hurdles for researchers who want to study medical marijuana, there is still extensive research supporting claims to its therapeutic properties. According to a new literature review published in the journal Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences, a pair of German researchers have identified 140 clinical trials since the year 1975 that involved around 8,000 participants and looked into the safety and efficacy of cannabis or its cannabinoids.

Most of the literature involving cannabis or cannabinoids was geared towards the treatment of chronic or neuropathic pain, and authors found 35 controlled studies involving 2,046 patients that used cannabis or cannabinoids for pain management. The National Academy of Sciences acknowledged the existence of "conclusive or substantial evidence" behind the efficacy of cannabis for chronic pain relief. Many studies have also assessed cannabinoids as anti-emetic agents or appetite stimulants, and the researchers found 43 trials involving 2,498 patients looking into these benefits. There were also 14 trials looking into cannabis or cannabis extracts for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Additionally, the researchers discovered several trials evaluating cannabis for Crohn's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Parkinson's disease, glaucoma, epilepsy, and other indication. 

This information has been provided by NORML and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. Find the full text of the study here.

CBD Proves Beneficial for Childhood Epilepsy in First Large-Scale Clinical Trial

 Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

Photo Credit: Medical Marijuana Inc.

A new study published in The New England Journal of Medicine has determined CBD reduces the frequency of seizures by 39% in patients with a rare and severe form of epilepsy known as Dravet syndrome. Led by Dr. Orrin Devinsky, researchers looked at the efficacy of CBD treatments over the course of 14 weeks across a group of 120 young people between the ages of two and 18 who suffered from Dravet syndrome. Participants' symptoms had been resistant to traditional medications. The study involved administering 20 mg of liquid CBD, or placebo, on top of their original medications. Those who received CBD went from around 12 convulsive seizures per month to only six, and three of the patients became seizure free. Over 90% of patients experienced side effects like vomiting, fatigue, or fever, but they were categorized as mild to moderate. Twelve children withdrew from the trial, nine from the CBD group and three from the placebo group.

While side effects are undesirable, Dr. Samuel Berkovic from the University of Melbourne's Epilepsy Research Center in Australia says, "Side effects are always an issue, but the drug was tolerated about as well as conventional anti-epileptic drugs." Devinsky's study is the first randomized, controlled trial demonstrating how effective CBD is for Dravet's syndrome, and he explains, “After four millennia of using cannabis to treat epilepsy, we now have for the first time scientifically rigorously obtained data that this specific compound works in this specific form of epilepsy.”

This information has been provided by Medical Marijuana Inc. and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. Find the full text of the study here.

Research Explores Cannabis to Relieve Chronic Pain

 Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

New research conducted under Dr. Jason Busse investigates whether or not cannabis could be an effective pain reliever. In his research, Busse looked at 1,915 patients across 26 studies in an "attempt to provide preliminary findings, as part of a larger workshop on the role of medical cannabis in managing chronic pain." Clinicians evaluated a patient's pain symptoms on a 1-10 scale, and found for 12% of patients, cannabis reduced their pain by one point on the scale. Finding alternative pain medications at a time when the opioid crisis has reached epidemic proportions is essential, and Busse claims "there is some evidence that (medical cannabis) may be effective for some patients." Busse is also interested in whether or not cannabis can be added on as a therapy that allows people to come down from their opioid medications.

This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer. 

Part 2: What You Need to Known About Cannabis Terpenes

 Photo Credit: MassRoots

Photo Credit: MassRoots

In our previous post, we provided a brief overview about the benefits of terpenes that can be found in various plants like cannabis, and that contribute to the overall symptom relief of a cannabis dosing regimen. Today, we will go through the most popular terpenes found in cannabis and discuss how they contribute to the efficacy of one's regimen. 

One of the most common terpenes found in cannabis is myrcene. It's recognized for it's musky, mango-like aroma, and it is responsible for providing sedative and sleepy effects. Strains high in myrcene are expected to be quite potent, and they help THC enter the brain faster. Another terpene, known for its lemon citrus scent, is limonene. Limonene is thought to relieve anxiety and may have anti-tumor properties when it comes to treating breast cancer. It may also fight acne-causing bacteria, fungal infections, and help those who suffer from gastrointestinal disorders. Another terpene known for its sharp and acidic pine-like scent is known as alpha-pinene. Alpha-pinene acts as a bronchodilator and may have anti-inflammatory properties. Some research suggests is may also improve memory.

Beta-caryophyllene is a special terpene that can also bind with cannabinoid receptors like cannabinoids do. Beta-caryophyllene is able to bind to the same locations as CBD, which allows it to produce anti-inflammatory properties, ease anxiety, and fight depression. This terpene can be recognized by its sharp, black pepper scent. It also buffers against some of the psychoactive effects of THC. Lastly, the terpene linalool produces a lavender scent, and acts as an anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant. Its effects are further enhanced alongside CBD. This terpene is also an anxiolytic that can quell stress and promote a sense of calm in a much more mild way than the sedative myrcene. 

This concludes our short series on terpenes. This information has been provided by MassRoots and approved by our Chief Medical Officer.